Global Wind Turbine Market, 2nd Edition

14 Nov 2011 • by Natalie Aster

New York – When compared to the LCOE of other electricity generation systems, wind is one of the most cost effective renewable energy sources available, with the LCOE of onshore wind beaten by only hydro and biomass electricity generation. Of course, RE sources are still more costly than non-RE sources, but steady improvements have brought onshore wind close to the same price as conventional coal plants. In fact, if new coal plants are required to be build with a carbon capture system (CCS), then onshore wind is considerably more economical over the entire life of the system, according to the report “Global Wind Turbine Market, 2nd Edition” by SBI.

Natural gas continues to have a much lower cost for electricity generation than onshore wind. However, these costs are dependant on the existing low cost of natural gas; a situation which could easily change over the lifecycle of any natural gas plant built today.

Report Details:

Global Wind Turbine Market, 2nd Edition
Date: November 2011
Pages: 174
Price: US$ 4,950.00

Report Sample Abstract

Market Trends

In every major market there has been a growing trend towards larger turbines in the small wind segment, with grid-integration becoming increasingly common in the markets of developed countries. In XXXX, the average size of small wind turbines sold is much less than in developed countries, with turbines in the XX-XX W range being the most common.

However, even here there is a trend towards larger systems and in the next XX years it will be turbines in the XX-XX W range which will be the largest selling category. In XXX grid tied systems accounted for XX% of all small wind systems in 2010 and the number of turbines sold in the XX-XX kW sizes has quadrupled in between 2006 and 2010.

In fact, turbines larger than XX kW are now the largest selling category by total kW sold per year. In XXXX the largest number of MW of new capacity sold in 2010 was XX MW of turbines in the XX-XX kW range. This compares to 2005 when over half of all new capacity installed was for turbines smaller than XX kW. On-grid installations accounted for XX% of all new installations in 2010 and an expected XX% of all installations in 2011, compared to XX% of installations in 2005.

Data on the level of XXXX small wind installations which are on-grid is unavailable. However, anecdotal evidence from the XXXX Small Wind Manufacturers Association indicates that the majority of small wind turbines installed in XXXX are for off-grid in remote locations. Of the approximately XXX wind turbines manufactured in XXXX in 2009, SBI Energy estimates at least XXXX of those systems were not tied to the grid.

Hybrid Wind Systems

Hybrid wind systems—systems which combine small wind turbines with solar, pumping systems, or other energy storage or production systems—can be enormously useful in remote locations where grid-tied electricity is simply not available. As a result, the bulk of the market for this category of wind systems is in developing countries such as XXXX and XXXX.

That being said, hybrid systems account for less than XX% of the global small wind segment, which is itself only a tiny percentage of the entire wind turbine market. In XXXX EWEA lists XX different companies which provide hybrid wind systems, XX of which manufacture solar-wind hybrid systems, and XX that manufacturer wind-diesel systems.

There are also a further XX companies who manufacture wind pumping systems. While XXXX does have a significant manufacturing base for small wind and hybrid turbines, quality has historically been poorer. This has resulted in XXXX hybrid wind system manufacturers having reasonable success in the XXXX market.

More information can be found in the report “Global Wind Turbine Market, 2nd Edition” by SBI.

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