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Peer2peer lending global facts and figures 2014

May 2014 | 400 pages | ID: P782D6E36DDEN
Ian Youngman

US$ 1,680.00

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Within crowd funding, equity and reward models tend to overshadow debt models, better known as peer-to-peer lending, but it is equally important to small businesses, individuals and financial markets around the world.

By 2016 the peer-to-peer market will be worth £5 billion in the UK, £ 20 billion in the USA and a global worth of £ 40 billion. Over the next decade the peer-to-peer industry will grow rapidly and reach $1 trillion (£0.59 trillion) globally according to US-based venture capital firm Foundation Capital. It could grow to $1 trillion by 2025.

The legal position of peer to peer lending is not clear in many countries and while some countries seek to legalise and encourage it, regulators in some places have tried to kill it, even though it may be legal. Peer to peer lending is an increasingly popular way of financing projects, business ideas, and personal loans through small contributions from a large number of individuals.

There are hundreds of platforms and several have gone multi-country. By 2020 it will be common for businesses and individual to connect with lenders via peer-to-peer websites and market wide platforms. It allows for the lending of money while bypassing traditional banks. Returns are financial, but investors also have the benefit of having contributed to the success of an idea they believe in.

This report offers an overview on market size, potential, types of loans, how it works, benefits, problems, background, and future. Each of the 59 country profiles includes regulators, regulations, upcoming changes to regulations, first platform, other platforms, and failed platforms. Author of “Peer2peer lending global facts and figures 2014 “ Ian Youngman comments- “ Peer to peer lending gets much media coverage but this is usually from a simplistic consumer view. What is missed is how important it is becoming to small businesses and professional investors.” Ian Youngman is a writer and researcher specialising in financial services. He writes regularly for a variety of magazines, newsletters, and on-line services. He publishes a range of market reports.
SECTION 1 MARKET SIZE AND RESEARCH

Global figures crowd funding
Global figures peer to peer
Europe figures crowd funding
Europe figures peer to peer
USA figures crowd funding
USA figures peer to peer
UK figures crowd funding
UK figures peer to peer
China figures peer to peer
Number of platforms
Global research
European research
Canadian research
China research
Ireland research
Mexican research
Netherlands research
Poland research
UK research
USA research
European commission

SECTION 2 TRADE ASSOCIATIONS

SECTION 3 COUNTRIES-REGULATION AND PLATFORMS

Argentina
Australia
Austria
Belgium
Brazil
Bulgaria
Canada
Chile
China
Croatia
Cyprus
Czech Republic
Denmark
Egypt
Estonia
Finland
France
Germany
Gibraltar
Greece
Guernsey
Hong Kong
Hungary
Iceland
India
Ireland
Israel
Italy
Jamaica
Japan
Jersey
Jordan
Latvia
Lebanon
Lithuania
Luxembourg
Mexico
Netherlands
New Zealand
Nicaragua
Nigeria
Norway
Poland
Portugal
Romania
Russia
Serbia
Singapore
Slovak Republic
Slovenia
South Africa
South Korea
Spain
Sweden
Switzerland
Turkey
Ukraine
United Kingdom
USA

SECTION 4 FINANCIAL SERVICES GROUPS

alternativebusinessfunding
Arcadia Capital
Bank of Montreal
Barclays
Capital One
Citigroup
Congressional Bank
Credit Agricole
Credit Suisse
Deutsche Bank
Disruption Credit
Eaglewood Capital
Emerald
FidorBank
Google
HCG Funds
Index Ventures
Inskit
Kingdom Trust
Lend Academy Investments
Looking Glass Investments
MainStreet Bank
Morgan Stanley
Oppenheimer
Orchard
Petra Partners
P2P Global
Prime Meridian
Ranger Capital
Rothschild
Santander
Thomsvest
Titan Bank
Union Bank
Union Square Ventures
University of Huddersfield
WebBank
Wells Fargo
Westpac
Wirecard Bank
Wonga

SECTION 5 TYPES OF LOANS

Asset
Bridging
Business
Buy to let
Car
Coding boot camps
Commercial property
Education
Energy
Entrepreneurs in developing countries
Family and friends
Farmers
Franchise
Graduate
Guaranteed personal loans
High net worth
ISA
Livestock
Micro
Mining
Mortgages
Pawnbroking
Pension funds
Personal
Post- graduate students
Professionals
Property
Real estate
Sharia
Solar
Student
Wedding
Women business owners
Young doctor

SECTION 6 A TO Z OF PEER TO PEER LENDING

Bad debts
Banks, professional investors and lenders
Banks investing in loans
Banks and lending
Banks as loan originators
Banks setting up platforms
Benefits
Charges to lenders
Defaults and late payments
Facebook alternative to payday loan companies
Family and friend lending
Getting a loan
History of crowd funding
History of peer-to-peer lending
How loans are set up
How platforms make money
How peer to peer lending works
Institutional lending
Lenders
Lenders pretending to be peer to peer lenders
Litigation
Loans to company employees
Microfinancing
Need for peer to peer lending
Offering banking licences
Payday loan companies
Platforms as sellers of services to small banks
Risks to lenders
Secondary loan markets
Social media
Specialist hedge funds
Target market
Tax
Threat to banks and other lenders
Types of peer- to- peer lending
Venture capital
Why peer to peer lending is better than a bank loan
Why peer-to-peer lending is a risk
Worldʼs largest peer-to-peer loan
Why bank lending has fallen off


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