Flow Cytometry Markets: Global Analysis and Opportunity Evaluation 2016 - 2020

Date: October 3, 2016
Pages: 246
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Publisher: Laboratory Markets Limited
Report type: Strategic Report
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Flow Cytometry Markets: Global Analysis and Opportunity Evaluation 2016 - 2020
Laboratory Markets Limited has completed a comprehensive market study of the global use of flow cytometry, covering methods and applications used in both clinical and research settings. Flow Cytometry 2016 profiles the use of these methods across more than 9,300 clinical and research organisations, encompassing 13 global regions and 120 countries. This study, which includes estimates of markets size and sample throughputs covers details of end-user organisations by name, which are provided as part of this report. The report also segments the clinical and research use of flow cytometry.

These new findings are the result of a detailed three-year market study, covering the period up until July 2016. These market data are combined and analysed alongside findings on flow cytometry growth and end-user costs from a separate independent market study, carried out by Laboratory Markets Limited.

Data presented in Flow Cytometry 2016 are from more than 23,300 clinical and research studies, carried out by experienced flow cytometry end-users. These end-users are major decision-makers in the selection and purchase of flow cytometry-related products and these 'real world' market data therefore provide in-depth information on the current and future use of flow cytometry, in addition to % growth, costs, trends and opportunities.

End-user organisations by name are identified in all key sectors and segments of this market study. Findings are provided as a PDF report, together with the full Flow Cytometry 2016 market database created and compiled during this extensive market study. The data provided enables flow cytometry suppliers to easily and rapidly identify, analyse and profile areas of the flow cytometry market that offer the greatest business opportunities to their own companies.

The extensive market database provided with the report augments detailed market findings presented in the PDF report, allowing rapid and easy in-depth analysis across all flow cytometry markets. This database can be shared across all departments and subsidiaries of purchasing organisations.

These new study findings provide a considerable wealth of market information to suppliers in the flow cytometry fields. They assist suppliers to identify new market opportunities and give powerful strategic insights into new developments, applications and opportunities.

This report: i) Enables suppliers to profile key areas of flow cytometry markets relating to their own products and services in this field and provides qualified prospects by end-user organisation name ii) Analyses and ranks flow cytometry practices by global region, country, market sizes, study sample throughputs, methods (flow cytometry, FACS, Cytometry Bead Array, Imaging Flow Cytometry), applications, diseases, bacterial and viral types, cells types, cell markers (CDs studied), end-users departments and other areas. These findings help suppliers to identify leading opportunities relevant to their current flow cytometry products and future plans in these fields, supporting targeted marketing and reducing costs and risks iii) Provides key information on developing areas of the flow cytometry market, helping suppliers focus resources on growth areas, supporting new sales opportunities in key market sectors iv) Helps suppliers to extend their own strategic visions, future plans and operational activities in the flow cytometry field v) Enables suppliers to identify, analyse and rank end-user practices and needs and build new customer relationships in leading flow cytometry market sectors

Flow Cytometry Market Study

This study provides detailed market data on the use of flow cytometry across all global regions, covering 120 countries. Leading countries are identified, together with top users by country state or county, city and organisation name.

Flow Cytometry 2016 identified more than 9,300 end-user laboratories, each of which are profiled across key market areas. This allows the analysis of key sectors, developments and opportunities in this field.

Organisation types using flow cytometry are profiled as part of this study including hospitals, research institutes, universities and companies. The departments in which these organisations use these methods, are also identified.

Methods profiled cover flow cytometry, FACS, Cytometry Bead Array and Imaging Flow Cytometry.

The PDF report provides an in-depth analysis of key findings across all major sectors, and identifies key developments and opportunities, growth and end-user costs in this diverse and growing field.

Key market areas have been profiled including global region, country, methods (flow cytometry, FACS, Cytometry Bead Array, Imaging Flow Cytometry), applications, diseases, bacterial and viral types, cells types, CDs and other areas.

These findings assist suppliers in the flow cytometry fields to keep pace with end-users' activities and needs. They also offer a highly cost-effective source of marketing and sales related information and give new insights into today's evolving clinical and research flow cytometry fields.

Flow Cytometry Database

The Flow Cytometry database contains more than 9,300 individual records of flow cytometry end-user organisations, covering more than 23,000 studies reported between January 2013 and May 2016. It gives easy access to datasets and provides valuable market insights.

This datebase is provided as an easy-to-use Excel file which can be rapidly analysed using Pivot Tables. This allows tables and graphs of all flow cytometry market sectors or segments to be easily generated in minutes.

Pivot table analysis allows the analysis of flow cytometry market data across all segments, allowing established methods and applications to be analysed, as well as developing markets and opportunities.

Data contained in the Flow Cytometry 2016 database allows side-by-side comparisons of current and developing practices and applications across key sectors of this market.

The database can be shared across all subsiduaries of purchasing organisations. This allows data analysis from several perspectives, from marketing and sales through to R&D and new product innovation.

This database enables easy analysis of flow cytometry practices from the methods and applications end-users are running, to analyses of marketed sizes and growth and market relationships, offering market predictions and trend analysis.

The market data presented in Flow Cytometry 2016 provides a valuable source of qualified sales prospects, based on the current and developing use of flow cytometry across multiple organisations and sectors.

Flow Cytometry 2016 Market Study

1. Flow Cytometry Laboratories

This market study covers more than 9,300 flow cytometry end-user laboratories globally, which are identified by organisation name and department, country and in most cases, by city. The top flow cytometry end-users (based on the numbers of reported flow cytometry studies) can be identified, as well as the 'top growers' based on the numbers of flow cytometry studies. These data enable suppliers to identify sales prospects and opportunities based on current use and market developments and trends. Findings on individual flow cytometry laboratories can be segmented across all areas of the study.

2. Flow Cytometry Methods

Findings on individual flow cytometry methods can be segmented across all areas of the study and these include global regions, countries, organisation names, organisation types (hospitals, clinics, medical centres etc), end-user departments, applications, diseases, cells types, bacterial and viral types, cell markers (clusters of differention, CDs), year and other areas. In all cases, the organisations reporting the use of these specific methods are identified by name in this study.

The methods identified and profiled in this study are flow cytometry, FACS, Cytometry Bead Array, Imaging Flow Cytometry

3. Applications

This study identified approximately 90 flow cytometry applications, which are presented in this report. Findings on individual applications can be can be segmented across global regions, countries, organisation names, organisation types (hospitals, clinics, medical centres etc), end-user departments, methods, diseases, cells types, bacterial and viral types, cell markers (clusters of differention, CDs), year and other areas. In all cases, the organisations reporting the use of these specific methods are identified by name in this study.

Flow cytometry application identified and profiled include Aneuploidy, Apoptosis, Asynchronous cells, Autoantibody, Autophagy, Bead assays, Caspase, Cell activation, Cell adhesion, Cell counting, Cell cycle, cell division, Cell function, Cell fusion, Cell growth, Cell markers, Cell motility, Cell phenotyping, Cell Proliferation, Cell signalling, Cell sorting, Cell surface antigens, Cell viability, Cell volume, Cellular uptake, Chemotaxis, Chlorophyll, Chromosome analysis, Chromosome sorting, Cross-Match, Cytogenetics, Cytokines, DNA analysis, DNA copy number, DNA degradation, Electropermeabilization, Endoreduplication, Enzymatic activity, FISH, Foeto-maternal haemorrhage, FRET, Gene expression, Genetic variations, Genome size, Glutathione, Hemocompatibility, Immune monitoring, Immunofluorescence, Immunophenotyping, Inflammation, Intracellular antigens, Intracellular calcium, Intracellular pH, Intracellular protein phosphorylation, Ion flux, Membrane fluidity, Membrane integrity, Membrane potential, Micronucleus, Microparticles, Minimal residual disease, Mitochondrial, Mitochondrial membrane, Morphology, Multidrug resistance, Mutagenesis, Mutation rate, Mutations, Necrosis, Nuclear antigens, Oxidative burst, Phagocytosis, Phenotyping, Phospho-proteins Phycoerythrin, Ploidy, Proliferation, Protein modifications, Rare cell events, Regulatory cells, RNA analysis, ROS, Staging of patients, Stem cells, Surface antigens, Toxicology, Transfusion, Transgenics and Transplantation.

4. Diseases

Findings from this study enable suppliers in the flow cytometry field to identify and profile laboratories where flow cytometry is used in specific disease areas. Findings on individual diseases can be can be segmented across global regions, countries, organisation names, organisation types (hospitals, clinics, medical centres etc), end-user departments, methods, applications, cells types, bacterial and viral types, cell markers (clusters of differention, CDs), year and other areas. In all cases, the organisations reporting the use of these specific methods are identified by name in this study.

Disease areas covered include Breast Cancer, Leukemia, lymphoma, Sclerosis, Hepatocellular Carcinoma, Rectal cancer, Prostate cancer, Gastric Cancer, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Lung Cancer, Glioma, Ovarian cancer, Myeloid Leukemia, Vascular Disease, Asthma, Hypoxia, Melanoma, Small Cell Lung Cancer, Pancreatic cancer, Multiple Myeloma, Osteosarcoma, Tuberculosis, Systemic lupus erythematosus, Cervical Cancer, Colon Cancer, Liver Cancer, Drug Resistance, Immunodeficiency, Malaria, Myocardial Infarction, Thrombocytopenia, stroke, Autoimmune Disease, Glioblastoma, Hepatitis B, Type 2 Diabetes, Pneumonia, Liver Disease, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, Renal cell carcinoma, Bladder Cancer, Neuroblastoma, Osteoarthritis, COPD, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Metastases, Hepatitis C, Type 1 Diabetes, Esophageal cancer, Infertility, AIDS, Leukaemia, Parkinson's Disease, Psoriasis, Nephropathy, Ovarian Carcinoma, Influenza A, Retinoblastoma, Pulmonary Fibrosis, Alzheimer's Disease, Osteoporosis, Kidney Disease, Telangiectasia, Retinopathy, Myopathy, Macular Degeneration, Hypertension, Skin cancer, Myelogenous Leukemia, Spondylitis, Systemic Sclerosis, Endometrial Cancer, Endometriosis, Leishmaniasis, Insulin Resistance, Uveitis, Heart Failure, Spinal cord injury, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Oral Cancer, Sjogren's syndrome, Splenomegaly, Skin lesion, Thyroid cancer, Traumatic brain injury, Pancreatitis, Schistosomiasis, Nephritis, Visceral leishmaniasis, Heart Disease, Allergic Rhinitis, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Thyroid Carcinoma, Hyperglycemia, Renal Disease, Coronary Artery Disease, Diabetes mellitus, Rhabdomyosarcoma, toxoplasma, Periodontal disease, Myelodysplastic, Mesothelioma, Miscarriage, urothelial carcinoma and Neck Cancer.

5. Clinical and Clinical Research Use

All flow cytometry studies cited in this report were reviewed to establish the clinical or research clinical use of these methods. Findings on clinical or research use can be segmented across global regions, countries, organisation names, organisation types (hospitals, clinics, medical centres etc), end-user departments, methods, applications, cells types, bacterial and viral types, cell markers (clusters of differention, CDs), year and other areas. In all cases, the organisations reporting the use of these specific methods are identified by name in this study.

6. Cell Types

Findings from this study enable suppliers in the flow cytometry field to identify and profile laboratories where flow cytometry is used relating to specific cell types. Findings on individual cell types can be can be segmented across global regions, countries, organisation names, organisation types (hospitals, clinics, medical centres etc), end-user departments, methods, applications, other cells types, bacterial and viral types, cell markers (clusters of differention, CDs), year and other areas. In all cases, the organisations reporting the use of these specific methods are identified by name in this study.

Cell types covered in this study include B cells, Lymphocytes, Endothelial cells, Macrophages, Dendritic cells, Epithelial cells, Platelets, Monocytes, T Cells, Fibroblasts, NK cells, Erythrocytes, Beads, Granulocytes, Neutrophils, Leukemia cells, Eosinophils, Circulating tumour cells, Hematopoietic cells, Plasma cells, Basophils, Leucocyte, Activated T-cells, Megakaryocyte, Helper T cell, Marrow stromal cell, Innate Lymphoid Cell, Cytotoxic T-cells, Thymocytes, T-helper cells, Reticulocyte, Langerhans cell, Myelomonocytic, Pre B Cells, Plant cells, Gamma delta T cells, Algae cell, Mature T-cell, Foeto-maternal haemorrhage and Haemopoietic stem cells.

7. Cell Markers

Findings from this study enable suppliers in the flow cytometry field to identify and profile laboratories where flow cytometry is used relating to specific cell markers. Findings on individual markers can be can be segmented across global regions, countries, organisation names, organisation types (hospitals, clinics, medical centres etc), end-user departments, methods, applications, cells types, bacterial and viral types, other cell markers (clusters of differention, CDs), year and other areas. In all cases, the organisations reporting the use of these specific methods are identified by name in this study.

Cell markers covered include CD8, CD4, CD8+, CD45, CD4+, CD7, CD34, CD14, CD5, CD56, CD13, CD11b, CD3, CD20, CD40, CD34+, CD38, CD10, CD31, CD41, CD18, CD45+, CD36, CD56+, CD27, CD3+, CD16+, CD25, CD15, CD11c, CD14+, CD33, CD24, CD19, CD23, CD61, CD138, CD19+, CD79a, CD28, CD30, CD32, CD39, CD117, CD57, CD3-, CD31-, CD29, CD21, CD2, CD26, CD35, CD22, CD1a, CD20+, CD43, CD103, CD24+, CD15+, CD17, CD11a, CD61+, CD37, and CD49a.

8. Viruses

Findings from this study enable suppliers in the flow cytometry field to identify and profile laboratories where flow cytometry is used relating to specific virus types. Findings on individual viruses can be can be segmented across global regions, countries, organisation names, organisation types (hospitals, clinics, medical centres etc), end-user departments, methods, applications, cells types, bacterial and other viral types, cell markers (clusters of differention, CDs), year and other areas. In all cases, the organisations reporting the use of these specific methods are identified by name in this study.

Around 390 virus types have been investigated and these include (in alphabetical order) African swine fever virus, Avian leukosis virus, Beak and feather disease virus, Betacoronavirus, Bluetongue virus, Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus, Bovine leukemia virus, Bovine viral diarrhea virus, Canine distemper virus,Cauliflower mosaic virus, Chicken anemia virus, Chikungunya virus, Citrus tristeza virus, Classical swine fever virus, Coronavirus, Cucumber mosaic virus, Cyprinid herpesvirus, Cytomegalovirus, Dengue virus, Duck circovirus, Enterovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, Equid herpesvirus, Feline calicivirus, Feline immunodeficiency virus, Feline leukemia virus, Foot-and-mouth disease virus, Frog virus, Gammapapillomavirus, Hepatitis, Herpes simplex, HIV, Hop stunt viroid, Human coronavirus, Human herpesvirus, Human metapneumovirus, Human papillomavirus, Human polyomavirus, Human respiratory syncytial virus, human T-lymphotropic virus, Infectious bursal disease virus, Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus, Infectious pancreatic necrosis virus, Influenza, Japanese encephalitis virus, JC polyomavirus, Lymphocystis disease virus, Mamastrovirus, Measles virus, Mouse mammary tumor virus, Mumps virus, Murine leukemia virus, Newcastle disease virus, Nipah virus, Norwalk virus, Orf virus, Ostreid herpesvirus, Ovine herpesvirus, Parainfluenza virus, Parapoxvirus, Parechovirus, Parvovirus, Pegivirus, Pepper mild mottle virus, Polyomavirus, Porcine circovirus, Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus, Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus, Potato virus, Puumala virus, Rabies virus, Respiratory syncytial virus, Reticuloendotheliosis virus, Rice stripe virus, Rift Valley fever virus, Rotavirus, Rubella virus, Sacbrood virus, Salivirus, Sendai virus, Seoul virus, Simian foamy virus, Simian immunodeficiency virus, Simian virus, Sindbis virus, Suid herpesvirus, Tembusu virus, Tick-borne encephalitis virus, Tobacco mosaic virus, Tobacco rattle virus, Tomato torrado virus, Tomato yellow leaf curl virus, Torque teno virus, Triatoma virus, Vaccinia virus, Varicella Zoster, Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus, West Nile virus, White spot syndrome virus, Yellow fever virus and Zika virus.

9. Bacteria

Findings from this study enable suppliers in the flow cytometry field to identify and profile laboratories where flow cytometry is used relating to specific bacterial types. Findings on individual bacteria can be can be segmented across global regions, countries, organisation names, organisation types (hospitals, clinics, medical centres etc), end-user departments, methods, applications, cells types, other bacterial and viral types, cell markers (clusters of differention, CDs), year and other areas. In all cases, the organisations reporting the use of these specific methods are identified by name in this study.

Around 710 bacteria types have been investigated and these include (in alphabetical order; Genus or Genus+Species) Acinetobacter baumannii, Actinobacteria, Aeromonas hydrophila, Aggregatibacter actino-mycetemcomitans, Agrobacterium, Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus thuringiensis, Bordetella pertussis, Borrelia, Borrelia burgdorferi, Brucella, Campylobacter, Campylobacter jejuni, Cardiobacterium hominis, Chlamydia, Chlamydia trachomatis, Clostridium, Clostridium difficile, Clostridium perfringens, Coxiella burnetii, Cyanobacteria, Ehrlichia canis, Enterobacter, Enterococcus, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium, Escherichia coli, Firmicutes, Flavobacterium, Francisella tularensis, Haemophilus influenzae, Helicobacter, Helicobacter pylori, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Lactobacillus, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactococcus lactis, Legionella, Legionella pneumophila, Leptospira, Leptospira interrogans, Leuconostoc van, Listeria monocytogenes, Mycobacteria, Mycobacterium, Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium bovis, Mycobacterium leprae, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycoplasma, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Mycoplasmas, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Neisseria meningitidis, Nontuberculous, Non-tuberculous mycobacteria, Paenibacillus, Pasteurella multocida, porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella, Proteus, Pseudomonas, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas syringae, Rhizobia, Rickettsia, Rickettsiae, Salmonella, Salmonella enterica, Salmonella typhimurium, Sarcina, Shigella, Staphylococcus, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus, Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus suis, Streptococcus thermophilus, Streptomyces, Treponema, Treponema denticola, Ureaplasma, Ureaplasma urealyticum, Vibrio, Vibrio alginolyticus, Vibrio anguillarum, Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio harveyi, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Wolbachia, Xanthomonas, Yersinia and Yersinia enterocolitica.

10. Global Regions

Findings from this study enable suppliers in the flow cytometry field to identify and profile laboratories where flow cytometry is used relating to specific global regions. Findings on global regions can be can be segmented across other global regions, countries, organisation names, organisation types (hospitals, clinics, medical centres etc), end-user departments, methods, applications, cells types, bacterial and viral types, cell markers (clusters of differention, CDs), year and other areas. In all cases, the organisations reporting the use of these specific methods are identified by name in this study.

Thirteen global regions have been investigated, namely (in alphabetical order) Asia, Caribbean, Central Africa, Central America, Eastern Africa, Europe, Middle East, North America, Northern Africa, Oceania, South America, Southern Africa and Western Africa.

11. Countries

Findings from this study enable suppliers in the flow cytometry field to identify and profile laboratories where flow cytometry is used relating to specific countries. Findings on countries can be can be segmented across global regions, other countries, organisation names, organisation types (hospitals, clinics, medical centres etc), end-user departments, methods, applications, cells types, bacterial and viral types, cell markers (clusters of differention, CDs), year and other areas. In all cases, the organisations reporting the use of these specific methods are identified by name in this study.

More than 120 countries have been investigated and these include (in alphabetical order) Algeria, Argentina, Australia, Austria, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Belarus, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Chile, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Ecuador, Egypt, Estonia, Ethiopia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Hong Kong, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Jersey, Jordan, Kenya, Kuwait, Latvia, Lebanon, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Macedonia, Malaysia, Mexico, Morocco, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Palestine, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Puerto Rico, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Romania, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Taiwan, Tanzania, Thailand, Tunisia, Turkey, Uganda, UK, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, Uruguay, USA, Venezuela, Vietnam and Zambia.

12. Organisation Types

Findings from this study enable suppliers in the flow cytometry field to identify and profile laboratories where flow cytometry is used relating to specific organisation types. Findings on organisation types can be can be segmented across global regions, other countries, organisation names, other organisation types (hospitals, clinics, universities, medical centres etc), end-user departments, methods, applications, cells types, bacterial and viral types, cell markers (clusters of differention, CDs), year and other areas. In all cases, the organisations reporting the use of these specific methods are identified by name in this study.

13. Departments

Findings from this study enable suppliers in the flow cytometry field to identify and profile laboratories where flow cytometry is used relating to specific end-user departments. Findings on specific departments can be can be segmented across global regions, other countries, organisation names, other organisation types (hospitals, clinics, universities, medical centres etc), other end-user departments, methods, applications, cells types, bacterial and viral types, cell markers (clusters of differention, CDs), year and other areas. In all cases, the organisations reporting the use of these specific methods are identified by name in this study.

Department types include Hematology, Medicine, Internal Medicine, Pathology, Immunology, Pediatrics, Urology, Surgery, Neurosurgery, General Surgery, Cardiology, Gastroenterology, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Neurology, Pharmacology, Ophthalmology, Oncology, Chemistry, Dermatology, Biochemistry, Biology, Physiology, Laboratory Medicine, Microbiology, Pharmacy, Respiratory Medicine, Orthopedics, Infectious Diseases, Radiation Oncology, Anesthesiology Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Nephrology, Biotechnology, Microbiology and Immunology, Clinical Laboratory, Medical Oncology, Biomedical Engineering, Rheumatology, Hepatobiliary Surgery, Orthopaedics, Endocrinology, Biological Sciences, Anatomy, Thoracic Surgery, Otorhinolaryngology, Otolaryngology, Gynecology and Obstetrics, Radiology, Stomatology, Pharmaceutics, Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zoology, Orthopaedic Surgery, Pathophysiology, Haematology, Gastrointestinal Surgery, Gynecology, Orthopedic Surgery, Chemical Engineering, Clinical Immunology, Cardiothoracic Surgery, Radiotherapy, Genetics, Clinical Sciences, Nuclear Medicine, Cardiovascular Surgery, Cell Biology, Histology and Embryology, Surgical Oncology, Bioengineering, Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Obstetrics, Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Pediatric Surgery, Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Plastic Surgery, Medical Sciences, Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Hematology and Oncology, Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Clinical Pathology, Breast Surgery, Pharmaceutical Biology, Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Life Sciences, Critical Care Medicine, Clinical Biochemistry, Physics, Molecular Medicine, Emergency, Traditional Chinese Medicine, Emergency Medicine, Clinical Medicine, Biomedicine, Molecular Biology, Medical Genetics, Chemistry and Biochemistry, Cardiovascular Medicine, Periodontology and Rheumatology and Immunology.

14. States, Counties and Cities

Findings from this study enable suppliers in the flow cytometry field to identify and profile laboratories where flow cytometry is used relating to specific states and cities. Findings on specific states/counties and cities can be can be segmented across global regions, other countries, organisation names, other organisation types (hospitals, clinics, universities, medical centres etc), other end-user departments, methods, applications, cells types, bacterial and viral types, cell markers (clusters of differention, CDs), year and other areas. In all cases, the organisations reporting the use of these specific methods are identified by name in this study.

15. Flow Cytometry Studies

All 23,300+ flow cytometry studies are fully referenced, allowing flow cytometry end-users to be identified by name alongside further details of their work.

16. Flow Cytometry Growth & Costs

Findings from Flow Cytometry 2016 are analysed alongside data on market % growth and end-user costs obtained during four other (separate) independent flow cytometry studies by Laboratory Markets Limited, provided by 271 experienced flow cytometry end-users.
1. INTRODUCTION

1.1 background
1.2 Flow Cytometry 2016
1.3 End-user Study

2. GLOBAL REGIONS

2.1 Global Flow Cytometry
2.2 All Global Regions
2.3 All Countries
2.4 North America
2.5 Europe
2.6 Asia
2.7 South America
2.8 Middle East
2.9 Oceania

3. ORGANISATIONS

3.1 Global Flow Cytometry
3.2 All Global Regions
3.3 Asia
3.4 Europe
3.5 North America
3.6 South America
3.7 Middle East
3.8 Oceania

4. DEPARTMENT TYPES

4.1 Overview
4.2 All Global Regions
4.3 Asia
4.4 Europe
4.5 North America
4.6 South America
4.7 Middle East
4.8 Oceania

5. FLOW CYTOMETRY METHODS

5.1 Global Flow Cytometry
5.2 All Global Regions
5.3 Asia
5.4 Europe
5.5 North America
5.6 South America
5.7 Middle East
5.8 Oceania

6. FLOW CYTOMETRY APPLICATIONS

6.1 Overview
6.2 All Global Regions
6.3 Asia
6.4 Europe
6.5 North America
6.6 South America
6.7 Middle East
6.8 Oceania

7. CELL TYPES

7.1 Overview
7.2 All Global Regions
7.3 Asia
7.4 Europe
7.5 North America

8. VIRUSES

8.1 Overview
8.2 All Global Regions
8.3 Asia
8.4 Europe
8.5 North America

9. BACTERIA

9.1 Overview
9.2 All Global Regions
9.2 Asia
9.4 Europe
9.5 North America

10. DISEASES

10.1 Overview
10.2 All Global Regions
10.3 Asia
10.4 Europe
10.5 North America

11. CD MARKERS

11.1 Overview
11.2 All Global Regions
11.3 Asia
11.4 Europe
11.5 North America

12. CLINICAL OR OTHER

12.1 Overview
12.2 All Global Regions
12.3 Asia
12.4 Europe
12.5 North America

13. GROWTH

14. END-USER STUDY

15. DISCUSSION

FIGURES

Figure 2.1 Flow Cytometry by Global Region
Figure 2.2 Flow Cytometry by Countries
Figure 2.3 Flow Cytometry in North America
Figure 2.3 Flow Cytometry in North America
Figure 2.4 Flow Cytometry in Europe
Figure 2.4 Flow Cytometry in Europe
Figure 2.4 Flow Cytometry in Europe
Figure 2.5 Flow Cytometry in Asia
Figure 2.5 Flow Cytometry in Asia
Figure 2.5 Flow Cytometry in Asia
Figure 2.6 Flow Cytometry in South America
Figure 2.6 Flow Cytometry in South America
Figure 2.7 Flow Cytometry in Middle East
Figure 2.7 Flow Cytometry in Middle East
Figure 2.7 Flow Cytometry in Middle East
Figure 2.8 Flow Cytometry in Oceania
Figure 2.8 Flow Cytometry in Cceania
Figure 3.1 Organisation types across all global regions
Figure 3.1 Organisation types across all global regions
Figure 3.1 Organisation types across all global regions
Figure 3.2 Organisation types in Asia
Figure 3.2 Organisation types in Asia
Figure 3.2 Organisation types in Asia
Figure 3.3 Organisation types in Europe
Figure 3.3 Organisation types in Europe
Figure 3.3 Organisation types in Europe
Figure 3.4 Organisation types in North America
Figure 3.4 Organisation types in North America
Figure 3.4 Organisation types in North America
Figure 3.5 Organisation types in South America
Figure 3.5 Organisation types in South America
Figure 3.6 Organisation types in the Middle East
Figure 3.6 Organisation types in the Middle East
Figure 3.7 Organisation types in the Oceania
Figure 3.7 Organisation types in Oceania
Figure 3.7 Organisation types in Oceania
Figure 4.1 Departments by all global regions
Figure 4.2 Departments in Asia
Figure 4.3 Departments in Europe
Figure 4.4 Departments in North America
Figure 4.5 Departments in South America
Figure 4.6 Departments in the Middle East
Figure 4.7 Departments in Oceania
Figure 5.1 Flow Cytometry by Global Region
Figure 5.2 Flow Cytometry by Global Region
Figure 5.3 Flow Cytometry by Global Region
Figure 5.4 Flow Cytometry by Global Region
Figure 5.5 Flow Cytometry by Global Region
Figure 5.6 Flow Cytometry by Global Region
Figure 5.7 Flow Cytometry by Global Region
Figure 6.1 Applications across all global regions.
Figure 6.2 Applications in Asia
Figure 6.3 Applications in Europe
Figure 6.4 Applications in North America
Figure 6.5 Applications in South America
Figure 6.6 Applications in the Middle East
Figure 6.7 Applications in the Oceania
Figure 7.1 Cell types studied across all global regions
Figure 7.2 Cell types studied in Asia
Figure 7.3 Cell types studied in Europe
Figure 7.4 Cell types studied in North America
Figure 8.1 Viruses studied across all global regions
Figure 8.2 Viruses studied in Asia
Figure 8.3 Viruses studied in Europe
Figure 8.4 Viruses studied in North America
Figure 9.1 Bacteria studied across all global regions
Figure 9.1 Bacteria studied in Asia
Figure 9.1 Bacteria studied in Asia
Figure 9.1 Bacteria studied in Asia
Figure 9.1 Bacteria studied in Asia
Figure 9.1 Bacteria studied in Europe
Figure 9.1 Bacteria studied in Europe
Figure 9.1 Bacteria studied in Europe
Figure 9.1 Bacteria studied in Europe
Figure 9.1 Bacteria studied in Europe
Figure 9.1 Bacteria studied in North America
Figure 9.1 Bacteria studied in North America
Figure 9.1 Bacteria studied in North America
Figure 9.1 Bacteria studied in North America
Figure 10.1 Diseases for all global regions
Figure 10.2 Diseases in Asia
Figure 10.3 Diseases in Europe
Figure 10.4 Diseases in North America
Figure 11.1 Flow Cytometry by Global Region
Figure 11.2 Flow Cytometry by Global Region
Figure 11.3 Flow Cytometry by Global Region
Figure 11.4 Flow Cytometry by Global Region
Figure 12.1 Clinical vs. other use, globally
Figure 12.2 Clinical vs. other use in Asia
Figure 12.3 Clinical vs. other use in Europe
Figure 12.4 Clinical vs. other use in North America
Figure 13.1 Growth of flow cytometry across in Asia 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.2 Growth of flow cytometry in Europe 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.3 Growth of flow cytometry in North America 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.4 Growth of flow cytometry in South America 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.5 Growth of flow cytometry in Middle East 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.6 Growth of flow cytometry in the Oceania 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.7 Growth of flow cytometry in Northern Africa 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.8 Growth of flow cytometry in Southern Africa 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.9 Growth of flow cytometry in Central America 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.10 Growth of flow cytometry in Eastern Africa 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.11 Growth of flow cytometry in China 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.12 Growth of flow cytometry in the United States 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.13 Growth of flow cytometry in Germany 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.14 Growth of flow cytometry in Japan 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.15 Growth of flow cytometry in United Kingdom 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.16 Growth of flow cytometry in Italy 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.17 Growth of flow cytometry in India 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.18 Growth of flow cytometry in France 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.19 Growth of flow cytometry in Spain 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.20 Growth of flow cytometry in Brazil 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.21 Growth of flow cytometry 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.22 Growth of FACS 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.23 Growth of Cytometric Bead Array 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.24 Growth of imaging flow cytometry 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.25 Growth of Apoptosis applications 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.26 Growth of gene expression applications 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.27 Growth of cytokines applications 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.28 Growth of cell cycle applications 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.29 Growth of cell sorting applications 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.30 Growth of T-cell applications 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.31 Growth of cell proliferation applications 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.32 Growth of cell counting applications 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.33 Growth of immune monitoring applications 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.34 Growth of cell activation applications 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.35 Growth of breast cancer applications 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.36 Growth of leukaemia applications 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.37 Growth of liver cancer applications 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.38 Growth of lymphoma applications 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.39 Growth of rectal cancer applications 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.40 Growth of prostate cancer applications 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.41 Growth of gastric cancer applications 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.42 Growth of squamous cell carcinoma 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.43 Growth of lung cancer applications 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.44 Growth of glioma applications 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.45 Growth of B lymphocyte cell studies 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.46 Growth of lymphocyte cell studies 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.47 Growth of endothelial cell studies 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.48 Growth of macrophage cell studies 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.49 Growth of dendritic cell studies 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.50 Growth of epithelial cell studies 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.51 Growth of platelet cell studies 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.52 Growth of monocyte cell studies 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.53 Growth of T-cell studies 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.54 Growth of fibroblasts 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.55 Growth of CD8 studies 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.56 Growth of CD4 studies 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.57 Growth of CD8+ studies 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.58 Growth of CD45 studies 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.59 Growth of CD4+ studies 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.60 Growth of CD7 studies 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.61 Growth of CD34 studies 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.62 Growth of CD14 studies 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.63 Growth of CD5 studies 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.64 Growth of CD56 studies 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.64 Growth of Hepatitis studies 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.64 Growth of HIV studies 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.64 Growth of Influenza A 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.64 Growth of Escherichia coli studies 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.64 Growth of Staphylococcus aureus 2013 to 2015
Figure 13.64 Growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis studies 2013 to 2015
Figure 2.1. Global regions of participants in FC2015
Figure 2.2. Top 10 countries of participants in FC2015
Figure 2.3. Top ten job titles of participants in FC2015
Figure 2.4. Top ten experience levels of participants in FC2015
Figure 2.5. Organisation types of participants in FC2015
Figure 2.6. Professional roles of participants in FC2015
Figure 2.7. Main flow cytometry activities of participants FC2015
Figure 3.1. Top ten fields of participants in FC2015
Figure 4.1. Top ten current broad flow
Figure 4.2. Top ten future broad flow
Figure 5.1. Main areas of flow cytometry of participants in FC2015
Figure 6.1. Main flow cytometry activities
Figure 6.2. Top ten current main samples analysed
Figure 6.3. Top ten anticipated future main samples to be analysed
Figure 6.4. Top ten current diseases relating to their
Figure 6.5. Top ten anticipated future diseases relating to their
Figure 6.6. Top ten current general applications relating to
Figure 6.7. Top ten anticipated future general applications relating to
Figure 6.8. Top ten current clinical applications relating to
Figure 6.9. Top ten future clinical applications relating to
Figure 6.10. Top ten current instrument suppliers relating to
Figure 6.12. Current instrument suppliers relating to their
Figure 6.12. Current instrument suppliers relating to their
Figure 6.11. Top ten anticipated future instrument suppliers relating to
Figure 6.12. Top ten current flow cytometry instruments in
Figure 6.13. Top ten future flow cytometry instruments in
Figure 6.14. Top ten innovation and development requirements in
Figure 6.15. Top ten current consumables suppliers relating to
Figure 6.16. Top ten future consumables suppliers relating to
Figure 6.17. Top ten sample preparation steps and methods
Figure 6.18. Top ten flow cytometry software types used in
Figure 6.19. Top ten numbers of colours used now in their
Figure 6.20. Top ten maximum numbers of colours used so far
Figure 6.21. Top ten numbers of colours expected to
Figure 7.1. Main flow cytometry activities
Figure 7.2. Top ten current main samples analysed
Figure 7.3. Top ten anticipated future main samples analysed
Figure 7.3. Anticipated future main samples analysed using
Figure 7.3. Anticipated future main samples analysed using
Figure 7.4. Top ten current diseases relating to their
Figure 7.5. Top ten anticipated future diseases relating to their
Figure 7.6. Top ten current general applications relating to
Figure 7.7. Top ten anticipated future general applications relating to
Figure 7.8. Top ten current clinical applications relating to
Figure 7.9. Current clinical applications relating to
Figure 7.9. Current clinical applications relating to
Figure 7.9. Current clinical applications relating to
Figure 7.9. Current clinical applications relating to
Figure 7.9. Top ten anticipated future clinical applications relating to
Figure 7.10. Top ten current instrument suppliers relating to
Figure 7.11. Top ten anticipated future instrument suppliers relating to
Figure 7.12. Top ten current flow cytometry instruments
Figure 7.13. Top ten anticipated future flow cytometry instruments in
Figure 7.14. Innovation and development requirements in
Figure 7.15. Top ten current consumables suppliers relating to
Figure 7.16. Top ten anticipated future consumables suppliers relating to
Figure 7.17. Top ten sample preparation steps and methods used
Figure 7.18. Top ten flow cytometry software types used in
Figure 6.19. Top ten numbers of colours used now in their
Figure 7.20. Top ten maximum numbers of colours used so far
Figure 7.21. Top ten numbers of colours expected to
Figure 8.1. Top ten recent growth trends in their flow
Figure 8.2. Top ten anticipated future growth trends in their flow
Figure 10.1. Top ten flow cytometry sample
Figure 11.1. Top ten monthly flow cytometry
Figure 11.3. Monthly flow cytometry sample

TABLES

Table 2.1 Flow Cytometry by Global Region
Table 2.1 Flow Cytometry by Global Region
Table 2.2 Flow Cytometry by Countries
Table 2.2 Flow Cytometry by Countries
Table 2.2 Flow Cytometry by Countries
Table 4.1 Departments by all global regions
Table 4.1 Departments by all global regions
Table 4.1 Departments by all global regions
Table 4.1 Departments by all global regions
Table 4.1 Departments by all global regions
Table 4.1 Departments by all global regions
Table 4.1 Departments by all global regions
Table 4.1 Departments by all global regions
Table 4.2 Departments in Asia
Table 4.2 Departments in Asia
Table 4.2 Departments in Asia
Table 4.2 Departments in Asia
Table 4.2 Departments in Asia
Table 4.2 Departments in Asia
Table 4.3 Departments in Europe
Table 4.3 Departments in Europe
Table 4.3 Departments in Europe
Table 4.3 Departments in Europe
Table 4.3 Departments in Europe
Table 4.3 Departments in Europe
Table 4.4 Departments in North America
Table 4.4 Departments in North America
Table 4.4 Departments in North America
Table 4.5 Departments in South America
Table 4.5 Departments in South America
Table 4.6 Departments in the Middle East
Table 4.6 Departments in the Middle East
Table 4.6 Departments in the Middle East
Table 4.7 Departments in Oceania
Table 4.7 Departments in Oceania
Table 5.1 Flow Cytometry by Global Region
Table 5.2 Flow Cytometry by Global Region
Table 5.3 Flow Cytometry by Global Region
Table 5.4 Flow Cytometry by Global Region
Table 5.5 Flow Cytometry by Global Region
Table 5.6 Flow Cytometry by Global Region
Table 5.7 Flow Cytometry by Global Region
Table 6.1 Applications across all global regions
Table 6.1 Applications across all global regions
Table 6.1 Applications across all global regions
Table 6.2 Applications in Asia
Table 6.2 Applications in Asia
Table 6.2 Applications in Asia
Table 6.3 Applications in Europe
Table 6.3 Applications in Europe
Table 6.3 Applications in Europe
Table 6.4 Applications in North America
Table 6.4 Applications in North America
Table 6.4 Applications in North America
Table 6.5 Applications in South America
Table 6.5 Applications in South America
Table 6.5 Applications in South America
Table 6.6 Applications in the Middle East
Table 6.6 Applications in the Middle East
Table 6.7 Applications in the Oceania
Table 6.7 Applications in the Oceania
Table 7.1 Cell types studied across all global regions
Table 7.1 Cell types studied across all global regions
Table 7.2 Cell types studied in Asia
Table 7.2 Cell types studied in Asia
Table 7.3 Cell types studied in Europe
Table 7.3 Cell types studied in Europe
Table 7.4 Cell types studied in North America
Table 7.4 Cell types studied in North America
Table 8.1 Viruses studied across all global regions
Table 8.1 Viruses studied across all global regions
Table 8.2 Viruses studied in Asia
Table 8.3 Viruses studied in Europe
Table 8.3 Viruses studied in Europe
Table 8.4 Viruses studied in North America
Table 8.4 Viruses studied in North America
Table 9.1 Bacteria studied across all global regions
Table 9.1 Bacteria studied across all global regions
Table 9.1 Bacteria studied across all global regions
Table 9.1 Bacteria studied across all global regions
Table 10.1 Diseases for all global regions
Table 10.1 Diseases for all global regions
Table 10.1 Diseases for all global regions
Table 10.1 Diseases for all global regions
Table 10.2 Diseases in Asia
Table 10.2 Diseases in Asia
Table 10.2 Diseases in Asia
Table 10.2 Diseases in Asia
Table 10.3 Diseases in Europe
Table 10.3 Diseases in Europe
Table 10.3 Diseases in Europe
Table 10.3 Diseases in Europe
Table 10.4 Diseases in North America
Table 10.4 Diseases in North America
Table 10.4 Diseases in North America
Table 10.4 Diseases in North America
Table 11.1 Flow Cytometry by Global Region
Table 11.1 Flow Cytometry by Global Region
Table 11.1 Flow Cytometry by Global Region
Table 11.2 Flow Cytometry by Global Region
Table 11.2 Flow Cytometry by Global Region
Table 11.3 Flow Cytometry by Global Region
Table 11.3 Flow Cytometry by Global Region
Table 11.3 Flow Cytometry by Global Region
Table 11.4 Flow Cytometry by Global Region
Table 11.4 Flow Cytometry by Global Region
Table 11.4 Flow Cytometry by Global Region
Table 13.1 Growth in the flow cytometry market
Table 13.1 Growth in the flow cytometry market
Table 13.1 Growth in the flow cytometry market
Table 2.1. Global regions of participants in FC2015
Table 2.2. Countries of participants in FC2015
Table 2.2. Countries of participants in FC2015
Table 2.3. Job titles of participants in FC2015
Table 2.3. Job titles of participants in FC2015
Table 2.3. Job titles of participants in FC2015
Table 2.3. Job titles of participants in FC2015
Table 2.4. Experience levels of participants in FC2015
Table 2.4. Experience levels of participants in FC2015
Table 2.5. Organisation types of participants in FC2015
Table 2.6. Professional roles of participants in FC2015
Table 2.7. Main flow cytometry activities of participants FC2015
Table 3.1. Fields of participants in FC2015
Table 3.1. Fields of participants in FC2015
Table 4.1. Current broad flow cytometry
Table 4.2. Future broad flow cytometry
Table 4.2. Future broad flow cytometry
Table 4.3. Comparative analysis of current and future main
Table 5.1 Main areas of flow cytometry of participants in FC2015
Table 6.1. Main flow cytometry activities
Table 6.2. Current main samples analysed using
Table 6.2. Current main samples analysed using
Table 6.3. Anticipated future main samples analysed using
Table 6.3. Anticipated future main samples analysed using
Table 6.4. Current diseases relating to their use of
Table 6.4. Current diseases relating to their use of
Table 6.5. Anticipated future diseases relating to their
Table 6.5. Anticipated future diseases relating to their
Table 6.6. Current general applications relating to their
Table 6.6. Current general applications relating to their
Table 6.7. Anticipated future general applications relating to
Table 6.7. Anticipated future general applications relating to
Table 6.8. Comparative analysis of current and future
Table 6.8. Comparative analysis of current and future
Table 6.9. Current clinical applications relating to their
Table 6.9. Current clinical applications relating to their
Table 6.9. Current clinical applications relating to their
Table 6.9. Current clinical applications relating to their
Table 6.10. Future anticipated clinical applications relating to
Table 6.10. Future anticipated clinical applications relating to
Table 6.10. Future anticipated clinical applications relating to
Table 6.11. Comparative analysis of current and future
Table 6.11. Comparative analysis of current and future
Table 6.11. Comparative analysis of current and future
Table 6.11. Comparative analysis of current and future
Table 6.13. Anticipated future instrument suppliers relating to
Table 6.14. Comparative analysis of current and future suppliers of
Table 6.15. Current flow cytometry instruments in
Table 6.15. Current flow cytometry instruments in
Table 6.15. Current flow cytometry instruments in
Table 6.16. Anticipated future flow cytometry instruments in
Table 6.16. Anticipated future flow cytometry instruments in
Table 6.17. Innovation and development requirements in
Table 6.17. Innovation and development requirements in
Table 6.17. Innovation and development requirements in
Table 6.18. Current consumables suppliers relating to their
Table 6.18. Current consumables suppliers relating to their
Table 6.19. Anticipated future consumables suppliers relating to
Table 6.19. Anticipated future consumables suppliers relating to
Table 6.20. Comparative analysis of current and future of
Table 6.20. Comparative analysis of current and future of
Table 6.20. Comparative analysis of current and future of
Table 6.21. Sample preparation steps and methods used
Table 6.21. Sample preparation steps and methods used
Table 6.22. Flow cytometry software types used in their
Table 6.22. Flow cytometry software types used in their
Table 6.23. Numbers of colours used now in their
Table 6.24. Maximum numbers of colours used so far
Table 6.25. Top ten numbers of colours expected to
Table 7.1. Main flow cytometry activities
Table 7.2. Current main samples analysed using
Table 7.2. Current main samples analysed using
Table 7.4. Current diseases relating to their use
Table 7.4. Current diseases relating to their use
Table 7.5. Anticipated future diseases relating to their use of
Table 7.5. Anticipated future diseases relating to their use of
Table 7.6. Current general applications relating to their
Table 7.6. Current general applications relating to their
Table 7.7. Anticipated future general applications relating to their
Table 7.7. Anticipated future general applications relating to their
Table 7.8. Comparative analysis of current and future
Table 7.8. Comparative analysis of current and future
Table 7.10. Anticipated future clinical applications relating to
Table 7.10. Anticipated future clinical applications relating to
Table 7.10. Anticipated future clinical applications relating to
Table 7.10. Anticipated future clinical applications relating to
Table 7.11. Comparative analysis of current and future
Table 7.11. Comparative analysis of current and future
Table 7.11. Comparative analysis of current and future
Table 7.11. Comparative analysis of current and future
Table 7.12. Current instrument suppliers relating to their
Table 7.12. Current instrument suppliers relating to their
Table 7.13. Anticipated future instrument suppliers relating to
Table 7.14. Comparative analysis of current and future suppliers
Table 7.15. Current flow cytometry instruments in
Table 7.15. Current flow cytometry instruments in
Table 7.16. Anticipated future flow cytometry instruments in
Table 7.16. Anticipated future flow cytometry instruments in
Table 7.17. Innovation and development requirements in
Table 7.17. Innovation and development requirements in
Table 7.17. Innovation and development requirements in
Table 7.18. Current consumables suppliers relating to
Table 7.18. Current consumables suppliers relating to
Table 7.19. Anticipated future consumables suppliers relating to
Table 7.19. Anticipated future consumables suppliers relating to
Table 7.20. Comparative analysis of current and future of flow
Table 7.20. Comparative analysis of current and future of flow
Table 7.21 Sample preparation steps and methods used
Table 7.21 Sample preparation steps and methods used
Table 7.22. Flow cytometry software types used in
Table 7.22. Flow cytometry software types used in
Table 8.1. Recent growth trends in their flow
Table 8.1. Recent growth trends in their flow
Table 8.2. Anticipated future growth trends in their flow
Table 8.2. Anticipated future growth trends in their flow
Table 10.1. Flow cytometry sample
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