Epiomic Epidemiology Series: Epilepsy Forecast in 19 Major Markets 2018–2028

Date: April 1, 2018
Pages: 86
Price:
US$ 5,800.00
Publisher: Black Swan Analysis limited
Report type: Strategic Report
Delivery: E-mail Delivery (PDF), Hard Copy Mail Delivery
ID: E6251389ACBEN
Leaflet:

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Epiomic Epidemiology Series: Epilepsy Forecast in 19 Major Markets 2018–2028
Black Swan Analysis Epiomic Epidemiology Forecast Report on Epilepsy in 19 Major Markets

Epilepsy is a complex neurologic disorder characterised by the occurrence of seizures, divided into several types according to clinical and EEG features. There is a wide variety of potential causes of epilepsy, including those of genetic, traumatic, metabolic, infectious, malignant or pharmacologic nature, but they are all a reflection of an existing brain dysfunction. Currently, 60–70% of cases of epilepsy can be controlled pharmacologically, but there are cognitive and behavioural impairments associated with seizures that can be severe and irreversible, especially if they occur at critical developmental points in early childhood.

This report provides the current prevalent population for epilepsy across 19 Major Markets (USA, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, UK, Poland, Netherlands, Russia, Turkey, Japan, China, South Korea, India, Australia, Brazil, Mexico, Argentina) split by gender and 5-year age cohort. In addition to the current prevalence, the report provides an overview of the risk factors, diagnosis and prognosis of the disease, along with specific variations by geography and ethnicity.

Providing a value-added level of insight from the analysis team at Black Swan, several features of epilepsy patients, as well as the main comorbidities of the disease have been quantified and presented alongside the overall prevalence figures. These sub-populations within the main disease are also included at a country level across the 10-year forecast snapshot.

Main co-morbidities of epilepsy include:
  • Behavioural and psychiatric disorders
  • Neurological disorders
  • Cardiovascular and respiratory diseases
  • Diabetes mellitus
  • Inflammation disorders
  • Obesity
  • Migraine
  • Arthritis
  • Lower mineral bone density and suicidal ideation (both due to medications)
This report is built using data and information sourced from the proprietary Epiomic patient segmentation database. To generate accurate patient population estimates, the Epiomic database utilises a combination of several world-class sources that deliver the most up-to-date information form patient registries, clinical trials and epidemiology studies. All of the sources used to generate the data and analysis have been identified in the report.

Reason to buy
  • Ability to quantify patient populations in global epilepsy market to target the development of future products, pricing strategies and launch plans.
  • Further insight into the prevalence of the subdivided types of epilepsy and identification of patient segments with high potential.
  • Delivery of more accurate information for clinical trials in study sizing and realistic patient recruitment for various countries.
  • Better understanding of the impact of specific co-morbid conditions on the prevalent population of epilepsy patients.
  • Identification of epilepsy patient sub-populations that require treatment.
  • Better understanding of the specific markets that have the largest number of epilepsy patients.
INTRODUCTION

CAUSE OF THE DISEASE

RISK FACTORS & PREVENTION

DIAGNOSIS OF THE DISEASE

VARIATION BY GEOGRAPHY/ETHNICITY

DISEASE PROGNOSIS & CLINICAL COURSE

KEY COMORBID CONDITIONS / FEATURES ASSOCIATED WITH THE DISEASE

METHODOLOGY FOR QUANTIFICATION OF PATIENT NUMBERS

TOP-LINE PREVALENCE FOR EPILEPSY

FEATURES OF EPILEPSY PATIENTS

COMORBIDITIES OF EPILEPSY PATIENTS

ABBREVIATIONS USED IN THE REPORT

OTHER BLACK SWAN SERVICES & SOLUTIONS

REPORTS & PUBLICATIONS

ONLINE EPIDEMIOLOGY DATABASES

ONLINE PHARMACEUTICAL PRICING DATABASE

REFERENCES

APPENDIX

LIST OF TABLES AND FIGURES

Table 1. The ILAE 2017 classification of seizure types—expanded version
Table 2. Selected AEDs and their mechanisms of action
Table 3. Prevalence of epilepsy, total (000s)
Table 4. Prevalence of epilepsy, males (000s)
Table 5. Prevalence of epilepsy, females (000s)
Table 6. Patients with epilepsy / epileptic syndrome by classification, total (000s)
Table 7. Patients with epilepsy by aetiological factors observed in CT, total (000s)
Table 8. Patients with epilepsy by aetiological factors observed in MRI, total (000s)
Table 9. Patients with epilepsy by cause, total (000s)
Table 10. Patients with epilepsy by BMI value, total (000s)
Table 11. Epilepsy patients with neuroses, total (000s)
Table 12. Epilepsy patients with depression, total (000s)
Table 13. Epilepsy patients with schizophrenia, total (000s)
Table 14. Epilepsy patients with dementia, total (000s)
Table 15. Epilepsy patients with a history of cerebrovascular accident, total (000s)
Table 16. Epilepsy patients with cerebral degeneration, total (000s)
Table 17. Epilepsy patients with Alzheimer's disease, total (000s)
Table 18. Epilepsy patients with Parkinson's disease, total (000s)
Table 19. Epilepsy patients with migraine, total (000s)
Table 20. Epilepsy patients with ischaemic heart disease, total (000s)
Table 21. Epilepsy patients with heart failure, total (000s)
Table 22. Epilepsy patients with congenital cardiac abnormalities, total (000s)
Table 23. Epilepsy patients with diabetes mellitus, total (000s)
Table 24. Epilepsy patients with pneumonia, total (000s)
Table 25. Epilepsy patients with asthma, total (000s)
Table 26. Epilepsy patients with chronic bronchitis, total (000s)
Table 27. Epilepsy patients with emphysema, total (000s)
Table 28. Epilepsy patients with peptic ulcers, total (000s)
Table 29. Epilepsy patients with gastrointestinal bleed, total (000s)
Table 30. Epilepsy patients with rheumatoid arthritis, total (000s)
Table 31. Epilepsy patients with osteoarthritis, total (000s)
Table 32. Epilepsy patients with fractures, total (000s)
Table 33. Epilepsy patients with eczema, total (000s)
Table 34. Abbreviations and acronyms used in the report
Table 35. USA prevalence of epilepsy by 5-yr age cohort, males (000s)
Table 36. USA prevalence of epilepsy by 5-yr age cohort, females (000s)
Table 37. Canada prevalence of epilepsy by 5-yr age cohort, males (000s)
Table 38. Canada prevalence of epilepsy by 5-yr age cohort, females (000s)
Table 39. France prevalence of epilepsy by 5-yr age cohort, males (000s)
Table 40. France prevalence of epilepsy by 5-yr age cohort, females (000s)
Table 41. Germany prevalence of epilepsy by 5-yr age cohort, males (000s)
Table 42. Germany prevalence of epilepsy by 5-yr age cohort, females (000s)
Table 43. Italy prevalence of epilepsy by 5-yr age cohort, males (000s)
Table 44. Italy prevalence of epilepsy by 5-yr age cohort, females (000s)
Table 45. Spain prevalence of epilepsy by 5-yr age cohort, males (000s)
Table 46. Spain prevalence of epilepsy by 5-yr age cohort, females (000s)
Table 47. UK prevalence of epilepsy by 5-yr age cohort, males (000s)
Table 48. UK prevalence of epilepsy by 5-yr age cohort, females (000s)
Table 49. Poland prevalence of epilepsy by 5-yr age cohort, males (000s)
Table 50. Poland prevalence of epilepsy by 5-yr age cohort, females (000s)
Table 51. Netherlands prevalence of epilepsy by 5-yr age cohort, males (000s)
Table 52. Netherlands prevalence of epilepsy by 5-yr age cohort, females (000s)
Table 53. Russia prevalence of epilepsy by 5-yr age cohort, males (000s)
Table 54. Russia prevalence of epilepsy by 5-yr age cohort, females (000s)
Table 55. Turkey prevalence of epilepsy by 5-yr age cohort, males (000s)
Table 56. Turkey prevalence of epilepsy by 5-yr age cohort, females (000s)
Table 57. Japan prevalence of epilepsy by 5-yr age cohort, males (000s)
Table 58. Japan prevalence of epilepsy by 5-yr age cohort, females (000s)
Table 59. China prevalence of epilepsy by 5-yr age cohort, males (000s)
Table 60. China prevalence of epilepsy by 5-yr age cohort, females (000s)
Table 61. South Korea prevalence of epilepsy by 5-yr age cohort, males (000s)
Table 62. South Korea prevalence of epilepsy by 5-yr age cohort, females (000s)
Table 63. India prevalence of epilepsy by 5-yr age cohort, males (000s)
Table 64. India prevalence of epilepsy by 5-yr age cohort, females (000s)
Table 65. Australia prevalence of epilepsy by 5-yr age cohort, males (000s)
Table 66. Australia prevalence of epilepsy by 5-yr age cohort, females (000s)
Table 67. Brazil prevalence of epilepsy by 5-yr age cohort, males (000s)
Table 68. Brazil prevalence of epilepsy by 5-yr age cohort, females (000s)
Table 69. Mexico prevalence of epilepsy by 5-yr age cohort, males (000s)
Table 70. Mexico prevalence of epilepsy by 5-yr age cohort, females (000s)
Table 71. Argentina prevalence of epilepsy by 5-yr age cohort, males (000s)
Table 72. Argentina prevalence of epilepsy by 5-yr age cohort, females (000s)
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