The Post-Recession Consumer in the U.S.

Date: May 22, 2010
Pages: 176
Price:
US$ 3,850.00
Publisher: Packaged Facts
Report type: Strategic Report
Delivery: E-mail Delivery (PDF)
ID: PF34B1FC5F8EN
Leaflet:

Download PDF Leaflet

The Post-Recession Consumer in the U.S.
ProdUnit Price (Global Site License) €5 000

As consumer confidence and economic optimism slowly returned in the first half of 2010, marketers and market researchers differed sharply over whether the price-conscious consumer who dominated the marketplace during the Great Recession would prove to be a temporary aberration or a permanent fixture in the American economy. This Packaged Facts report sifts through five years of Experian Simmons National Consumer Study (NCS) data to follow the twists and turns in consumer confidence before, during and in the immediate aftermath of the most severe economic downturn in 70 years. The report contrasts the attitudes and behavior of consumers on the highest end of the Consumer Confidence Index of the Experian Simmons NCS (“Confident Consumers”) with those on the lowest end (“Anxious Consumers”). By doing so, it sheds light on the conflicted mindset of consumers as the recession loses its grip and suggests how marketers might respond to their customers in an uncertain post-recession economic environment.

The first chapter of the report tracks changes in consumer confidence between 2005 and 2009, provides in-depth insights into trends affecting the post-recession environment in key areas such as price sensitivity and use of premium brands and highlights key opportunities in the post-recession consumer market. The next chapters contrast the demographics of Anxious and Confident Consumers today, analyze how Confident and Anxious Consumers handle their personal finances and provide an overview of their shopping and spending patterns. Subsequent chapters offer an in-depth view of how Confident and Anxious Consumers shop in supermarkets and drugstores and how they behave when shopping for the home. Another chapter offers an extensive analysis of how Confident and Anxious Consumers spend leisure time, including home entertainment, going out, and using the Internet and cellphones. The final chapter focuses on Confident and Anxious Consumers in the fashion and automotive sectors.
CHAPTER 1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Background

Introduction
Overview of the Report

Scope and Methodology

Scope of the Market
Methodology

Trends and Opportunities

Confident Consumers Begin to Return to the Marketplace
The “New Frugality”: A Temporary Fad or a Permanent Condition?
Post-Recession Consumers Remain Sensitive to Price
Brand Names Continue to Appeal to Confident Consumers
Increasing Reliance on Online Shopping Likely to Endure
Hyperpartisan Political Environment Affects Confidence
Marketers Try to Redefine Meaning of Value in Unpredictable Post-Recession Environment
Confident Consumers Offer the Best Way Forward for Marketers

Personal Profile of Anxious and Confident Consumers

Nearly 48 Million Consumers Categorized as Confident
Younger Consumers Maintain Confidence, Older Consumers More Anxious
Men in 45+ Age Group Most Likely to Be Anxious Consumers
Multicultural Consumers More Confident
Regional and Urban Differences Seen
Marital Status Impacts Consumer Confidence
Larger Households More Confident
Education Creates Confident Consumers
Job Switching Part of Confident Consumer Profile
Managers and Professionals Dominate Confident Consumers
Multiple Earners in Household Make for Confident Consumers
Views of Life Mirror Level of Economic Confidence
Political Orientation Affects Consumer Views

Managing Personal Finances

Confident Consumers Are Careful with Their Money
Anxious Consumers More Worried about Banks
Confident Consumers Are Informed Buyers of Financial Services
Anxious Consumers More Likely to Use Credit Cards
Paying Bills Online Favored by Confident Consumers
Confident Consumers Less Averse to Risk
Anxious and Confident Consumers Equally Likely to Own Investments
Savings Accounts More Popular with Confident Consumers
Confident Consumers Have More Debt
Confident Consumers Have More High-Value Life Insurance Policies

Overview of Shopping Behavior

Anxious Consumers Shop Less Often
Confident Consumers See Shopping as Experience, Not a Chore
New Stores Entice Confident Consumers
Confident Consumers Look for Good Deals
Brand Awareness Higher among Confident Consumers
Confident Consumers Are Influencers
Environmentally Friendly Companies Favored by Confident Consumers
Anxious Consumers Prefer to Buy American
Anxious Consumers Don’t Like Advertising
Product Placement Works with Confident Consumers
Anxious Consumers Like Cents-Off Coupons
Manufacturers’ Incentive Offers Draw Attention from Confident Consumers
Confident Consumers More Alert to In-Store Promotions and Advertising
Confident Consumers Are Big Online Spenders
Confident Consumers More Inclined to Buy Automobiles and Consumer Electronics

Shopping in Supermarkets and Drug Stores

New Foods Entice Confident Consumers
Frozen Dinners Get Nod from Anxious Consumers
Anxious Consumers Less Interested in Grocery Shopping
Little Difference in Use of Cents-Off Coupons in Supermarkets
Confident Consumers More Alert to In-Store Promotions and Advertising
Anxious Consumers Lean toward Store Brands in Supermarkets
Confident Consumers Shop More Often in Drug Stores
Store Brands More Popular with Anxious Consumers When in Drug Stores

Shopping for the Home

New Consumer Electronics Products Lure Tech-Savvy Confident Consumers
Confident Consumers More Likely to Shop in Consumer Electronics Stores
Homes of Confident Consumers Filled with Electronics
Big TVs Found in Confident Consumer Households
Confident Consumers Spend More on Home Furnishings and Bed, Bath & Linens
Household Appliance Purchases Similar
Confident Consumers More Likely to Plan Home Remodeling Projects
Similar Patterns in Shopping in Home Improvement Stores

How Confident and Anxious Consumers Spend Leisure Time

Anxious and Confident Consumers Share Many Leisure Activities
Anxious Consumers Less Involved with the Internet
Confident Consumers Tied to the Internet
Primetime Viewing Habits Differ
Confident Consumers Turn Away from CDs to Downloads
Bookstores Still Important
Many Differences in Magazine Choices of Men in Anxious and Confident Consumer Segments
Cellphones Vital Part of Lifestyle of Confident Consumers
Confident Consumers Go Out More
Anxious and Confident Consumers Choose Same Family and Fast Food Restaurants
Anxious Consumers Would Rather Stay in the U.S.
Cruises Attract Anxious Consumers

Consumer Profiles: Fashion and Automotive

Even Confident Consumers Cautious about Spending on Clothes
Walmart and Target Top Choices for Anxious and Confident Consumers
Store Brands of Women’s Lingerie More Popular among Anxious Consumers
Multiple Vehicles Common in Both Anxious and Confident Consumer Households
American Cars Get More Respect from Confident Consumers
Anxious Consumers Dial Back Expectations
Confident Consumers More Likely to Spend $30,000 or More for Cars
New Car Purchases Planned by Confident Consumers

CHAPTER 2 TRENDS AND OPPORTUNITIES

The Return of the Confident Consumer

Confident Consumers Begin to Return to the Marketplace
Figure 2-1: Number of Anxious and Confident Consumers, Selected Time Periods 2005-2009
Figure 2-2: Anxious and Confident Consumers as Percentages of the Adult Population, Selected Time Periods 2005-2009
Higher-Income Consumers Start to Regain Confidence
Table 2-1: Percent of Individuals with Employment Income and Household Income of $100,000 or More Classified as Anxious and Confident Consumers, Selected Time Periods 2005-2009

Trends in Post-Recession Consumer Attitudes

The “New Frugality”: A Temporary Fad or a Permanent Condition?
Post-Recession Consumers Remain Sensitive to Price
Table 2-2: Attitudes toward Sales and Bargains, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers by Selected Time Periods 2005-2009
Coupon Use on the Rise
Figure 2-3: Percent Agreeing “Coupons Draw Me to Stores I Don’t Normally Shop,” Anxious vs. Confident Consumers by Selected Time Periods 2005-2009
Brand Names Continue to Appeal to Confident Consumers
Table 2-3: Attitudes toward Brand Names, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers by Selected Time Periods 2005-2009
Table 2-4: Purchase of Store Brands for Items Tracked by Experian Simmons NCS, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Consumers Express Mixed Feelings about Pursuing Quality
Table 2-5: Attitudes toward Quality, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers by Selected Time Periods 2005-2009
Increasing Reliance on Online Shopping Likely to Endure among Post-Recession Consumers
Table 2-6: Trends in Shopping on the Internet, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers by Selected Time Periods 2005-2009

Shifts in Consumer Demographics during the Great Recession

Consumer Confidence a Dynamic Phenomenon
Many Changes in Demographic Profile of Anxious and Confident Consumers
Figure 2-4: Percent of U.S. Adults Identifying as Conservative Christian Evangelicals Who Are Anxious or Confident Consumers
Table 2-7: Profile of Confident Consumers by Selected Demographic Characteristics, Selected Time Periods 2005-2009
Table 2-8: Profile of Anxious Consumers by Selected Demographic Characteristics, Selected Time Periods 2005-2009
Hyperpartisan Political Environment Affects Consumer Confidence
Table 2-9: Percent Classified as Anxious Consumers by Party Identification, Selected Time Periods 2005-2009
Table 2-10: Percent Classified as Confident Consumers by Party Identification, Selected Time Periods 2005-2009
Table 2-11: Percent Classified as Anxious Consumers by Political Orientation, Selected Time Periods 2005-2009
Figure 2-5: Percent Classified as Anxious Consumers, “Very Conservative” vs. All Adults by Selected Time Periods 2005-2009
Table 2-12: Percent Classified as Anxious Consumers by Race and Hispanic Origin, Selected Time Periods 2005-2009
Table 2-13: Percent Classified as Confident Consumers by Race and Hispanic Origin, Selected Time Periods 2005-2009

Market Opportunities in the Post-Recession Era

Marketers Try to Redefine Meaning of Value in Unpredictable Post-Recession Environment
Competing across Categories Seen as Vital after the Recession
Marketers Need to Acknowledge that Not All Post-Recession Consumers Are the Same
Even Confident Consumers Remain Cautious
Confident Consumers Still Offer the Best Way Forward for Marketers
Table 2-14: Aggregate Income of Confident Consumer Households
Table 2-15: Aggregate Income of Anxious Consumer Households

CHAPTER 3 PERSONAL PROFILE OF ANXIOUS AND CONFIDENT CONSUMERS

Demographic Highlights

Nearly 48 Million Consumers Categorized as Confident
Table 3-1: Number of Anxious and Confident Consumers
Younger Consumers Maintain Confidence, Older Consumers More Anxious
Table 3-2: Anxious and Confident Consumers by Age Group
Men in 45+ Age Group Most Likely to Be Anxious Consumers
Figure 3-1: Percent Categorized as Anxious Consumers, Under-45 vs. 45-and-Over Age Groups
Figure 3-2: Percent Categorized as Anxious Consumers by Gender and Detailed Age Groups
Table 3-3: Anxious and Confident Consumers by Gender and Age Group
Older Men More Likely to Face Long-Term Unemployment
Table 3-4: Unemployment Rate and Duration of Unemployment among Men by Age Group, 2009
Multicultural Consumers More Confident
Table 3-5: Race and Hispanic Origin, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Regional and Urban Differences Seen
Table 3-6: Region of Residence, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Table 3-7: Percent Living in Metro Markets by Size and Region of Market, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Marital Status Impacts Consumer Confidence
Table 3-8: Marital Status, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Larger Households More Confident
Table 3-9: Size of Household and Presence of Children, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers

Employment and Income

Education Creates Confident Consumers
Table 3-10: Educational Achievement, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Job Switching Part of Confident Consumer Profile
Table 3-11: Job Experience in Last 12 Months, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Managers and Professionals Dominate Confident Consumers
Table 3-12: Employment Profile, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Multiple Earners in Household Make for Confident Consumers
Table 3-13: Number of Employed Adults in Household, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Table 3-14: Household Income, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Table 3-15: Employment Income, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Homeownership Generates Anxiety
Table 3-16: Homeownership Status, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers

Life Views of Anxious and Confident Consumers

Views of Life Mirror Level of Economic Confidence
Table 3-17: Attitudes toward Life, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Political Orientation Affects Consumer Views
Table 3-18: Political Profile, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Table 3-19: Social and Religious Values, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Memberships Highlight Differences between Anxious and Confident Consumers
Figure 3-3: Percent Belonging to Any Membership Group, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Table 3-20: Memberships, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers

CHAPTER 4 MANAGING PERSONAL FINANCES

Overview

Confident Consumers Are Careful with Their Money
Table 4-1: Managing Personal Finances, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Anxious Consumers More Worried about Banks
Figure 4-1: Percent Uncomfortable Trusting Money to a Bank, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Confident Consumers Are Informed Buyers of Financial Services
Table 4-2: Attitudes toward Financial Services, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Anxious Consumers More Likely to Hire Tax Preparation Service
Figure 4-2: Percent Preferring to Have Professional Prepare Taxes, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers

Use of Credit Cards

Anxious Consumers More Likely to Use Credit Cards
Table 4-3: Use of Credit Cards, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
ATM Cards More Popular with Confident Consumers
Figure 4-3: Percent with ATM/Debit Card, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Confident Consumers Pay Bills Online
Table 4-4: Method Used to Pay Bills, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers

Banking and Investing

Confident Consumers Less Averse to Risk
Figure 4-4: Percent Agreeing that Investing in the Stock Market Is Too Risky, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Anxious and Confident Consumers Equally Likely to Own Investments
Table 4-5: Investments Owned, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Confident Consumers More Likely to Have Savings Accounts
Table 4-6: Banking and Investments, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Confident Consumers Have More Debt
Figure 4-5: Percent with Loans of Any Type, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Table 4-7: Type of Loans, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers

Insurance

Life Insurance Important to Confident Consumers
Table 4-8: Attitudes toward Insurance, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Confident Consumers Have More High-Value Life Insurance Policies
Table 4-9: Ownership of Life Insurance, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Homeowners Insurance More Common in Anxious Consumer Segment
Table 4-10: Property and Vehicle Insurance, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Health Insurance Varies
Table 4-11: Ownership of Health Insurance, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers

CHAPTER 5 OVERVIEW OF SHOPPING BEHAVIOR

Importance of Shopping

Confident Consumers Like to Shop
Table 5-1: Attitudes toward Shopping, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Anxious Consumers Shop Less Often
Figure 5-1: Percent Shopping in Department or Discount Store at least Seven Times in Last Four Weeks, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Figure 5-2: Percent Visiting Shopping Mall in Last Four Weeks, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Convenience Stores Attract Confident Consumers
Table 5-2: Shopping in Convenience Stores in Last Four Weeks, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Confident Consumers See Shopping as Experience, Not a Chore
Table 5-3: Shopping Behavior, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
New Stores Entice Confident Consumers
Table 5-4: Shopping in New Stores, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Confident Consumers on Quest for Quality
Table 5-5: Attitudes toward Buying Quality, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Confident Consumers Look for Good Deals
Table 5-6: Attitudes toward Sales and Bargains, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Brand Awareness Higher among Confident Consumers
Table 5-7: Brand Awareness, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Confident Consumers Are Influencers
Table 5-8: Impact on Others’ Buying Decisions, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Environmentally Friendly Companies Favored by Confident Consumers
Table 5-9: Attitudes toward Going Green, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Anxious Consumers Prefer to Buy American
Figure 5-3: Percent Agreeing that They Buy Goods Produced by Own Country When They Can, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers

Impact of Advertising and Promotions

Anxious Consumers Don’t Like Advertising
Table 5-10: Attitudes toward Advertising, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Out-of-Home Ads Work with Confident Consumers
Table 5-11: Impact of Out-of-Home Advertising, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Product Placement Works with Confident Consumers
Table 5-12: Impact of Product Placement, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Anxious Consumers Like Cents-Off Coupons
Table 5-13: Use of Cents-Off Coupons, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Manufacturers’ Incentive Offers Draw Attention from Confident Consumers
Table 5-14: Use of Incentive Offers from Product Manufacturers, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Confident Consumers More Alert to In-Store Promotions and Advertising
Table 5-15: Impact of In-Store Promotions and Advertising, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers

Online and Catalog Shopping

Confident Consumers Geared toward Online Shopping
Table 5-16: Attitudes toward Online Shopping, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Table 5-17: Online Activities in Last Seven Days (excluding email), Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Confident Consumers Are Big Online Spenders
Table 5-18: Amount Spent on Internet in Last 12 Months, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Confident Consumers See Cellphones as Shopping Tool
Figure 5-4: Percent Interested in Using Cellphones for Store Purchases, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Catalog Shopping Appeals to Both Segments
Figure 5-5: Percent Buying Merchandise from Catalog in Last 12 Months, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Table 5-19: Catalog Shopping in Last 12 Months, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers

Purchasing Patterns

Women More Likely to Be Primary Shoppers in Confident Consumer Households
Table 5-20: Gender of Primary Shopper, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Confident Consumers More Inclined to Buy Automobiles and Consumer Electronics
Table 5-21: Products Bought in Last 12 Months, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers

CHAPTER 6 SHOPPING IN SUPERMARKETS AND DRUG STORES

Supermarkets and Food Stores

New Foods Entice Confident Consumers
Table 6-1: Attitudes toward Cooking at Home, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Table 6-2: Attitudes toward Trying New Foods, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Frozen Dinners Get Nod from Anxious Consumers
Table 6-3: Attitudes toward Eating Store-Made Meals and Frozen Dinners, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Anxious Consumers Less Interested in Grocery Shopping
Figure 6-1: Percent Agreeing that “Shopping for Groceries Is a Bore,” Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Table 6-4: Number of times Shopped in Supermarkets and Food Stores in Last Four Weeks, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Table 6-5: Average Amount Spent per Week in Supermarkets and Food Stores in Last Four Weeks, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Little Difference in Use of Cents-Off Coupons in Supermarkets
Table 6-6: Use of Cents-Off Coupons, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Confident Consumers More Alert to In-Store Promotions and Advertising
Table 6-7: Impact of In-Store Promotions and Advertising When Food Shopping, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Anxious Consumers Lean toward Store Brands in Supermarkets
Table 6-8: Overview of Purchase of Store Brands in Supermarkets, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Table 6-9: Percent of Food Product Users Using Store Brands, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Table 6-10: Percent Using Store Brands for Non-Food Items in Supermarkets, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers

Drug Stores

Confident Consumers Shop More Often in Drug Stores
Table 6-11: Drug Stores Shopped in Last Four Weeks, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Confident Consumers Believe in Vitamins
Table 6-12: Attitudes toward Vitamins, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Store Brands More Popular with Anxious Consumers When in Drug Stores
Figure 6-2: Percent Agreeing that Over-the-Counter Store Brands Work Just as Well as Advertised Brands, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Table 6-13: Percent Using Store Brands in Drug Stores, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers

CHAPTER 7 SHOPPING FOR THE HOME

Consumer Electronics

New Consumer Electronics Products Lure Tech-Savvy Confident Consumers
Table 7-1: Attitudes toward Consumer Electronics, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Figure 7-1: Percent Buying Consumer Electronics Products in Last 12 Months, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Figure 7-2: Percent Planning to Buy New Personal Computer in Future, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Confident Consumers More Likely to Shop in Consumer Electronics Stores
Table 7-2: Shopping in Consumer Electronics Stores, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Table 7-3: Shopping in Office Supply/Computer Stores, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Table 7-4: Place of Purchase of Selected Consumer Electronics Products, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Homes of Confident Consumers Filled with Electronics
Table 7-5: Ownership of Selected Consumer Electronics Products, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Big TVs Found in Confident Consumer Households
Table 7-6: Ownership of Television Sets, DVD Players and VCRs, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers

Home Furnishings

Home Furnishings Shopping Habits Similar
Table 7-7: Shopping in Home Furnishings Stores, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Confident Consumers Spend More on Home Furnishings and Bed, Bath & Linens
Table 7-8: Expenditures on Household Furnishings and Bed, Bath & Linens in Last 12 Months, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Household Appliance Purchases Similar
Figure 7-3: Percent Buying Major Household Appliance in Last 12 Months, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Figure 7-4: Percent Buying Small/Countertop Appliance in Last 12 Months, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers

Home Improvement

Major Home Remodeling Projects More Common among Confident Consumers
Figure 7-5: Percent Carrying Out Any Home Remodeling Project, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Table 7-9: Remodeling Kitchens and Bathrooms, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Similar Patterns in Shopping in Home Improvement Stores
Table 7-10: Shopping in Home Improvement Stores, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers

CHAPTER 8 HOW CONFIDENT AND ANXIOUS CONSUMERS SPEND LEISURE TIME

Overview

Confident Consumers More Physically Fit
Table 8-1: Physical Fitness Programs, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Anxious and Confident Consumers Share Many Leisure Activities
Table 8-2: Hobbies and Leisure Activities in Last 12 Months, Anxious vs. Confident Male Consumers
Table 8-3: Hobbies and Leisure Activities in Last 12 Months, Anxious vs. Confident Female Consumers

Home Entertainment

Anxious Consumers less Involved with the Internet
Table 8-4: Impact of the Internet, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Many Confident Consumers Tied to the Internet
Table 8-5: Internet Usage at Home in Last Seven Days (excluding email), Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Table 8-6: Online Activities in Last Seven Days (excluding email), Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Video-on-Demand More Popular among Confident Consumers
Table 8-7: Access to Cable Television, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Table 8-8: Video-On-Demand Services, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Primetime Viewing Habits Differ
Table 8-9: Primetime Viewing, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Confident Consumers Turn Away from CDs to Downloads
Table 8-10: Purchase of Music in Last 12 Months, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Bookstores Still Important
Table 8-11: Purchase of Books in Last 12 Months, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Women in Anxious Consumer Segment More Likely to Read Magazines
Table 8-12: Most Popular Magazines, Anxious vs. Confident Female Consumers
Many Differences in Magazine Choices of Men in Anxious and Confident Consumer Segments
Table 8-13: Differences in Magazine Reading Habits, Anxious vs. Confident Male Consumers
Table 8-14: Most Popular Magazines, Anxious vs. Confident Male Consumers

Staying in Touch with Family and Friends

Cellphones Vital Part of Lifestyle of Confident Consumers
Table 8-15: Attitudes toward Cellphones, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Extra Features Important to Confident Consumers
Table 8-16: Ownership and Use of Cellphones , Anxious vs. Confident Consumers

Going Out

Confident Consumers Go Out More
Table 8-17: Attendance at Live Entertainment Events in Last 12 Months, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Movies Major Part of Entertainment Agenda for Confident Consumers
Table 8-18: Movie Attendance, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Confident Consumers Frequent Users of Fast Food Outlets
Table 8-19: Use of Family and Fast Food Restaurants in Last 30 Days, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Anxious and Confident Consumers Choose Same Family and Fast Food Restaurants
Table 8-20: Family Restaurants Visited Most, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Table 8-21: Fast Food Restaurants Visited Most, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers

Travel

Anxious Consumers Would Rather Stay in the U.S.
Table 8-22: Attitudes toward Travel, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Table 8-23: Foreign Travel, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Anxious Consumers Travel Less Frequently
Table 8-24: Domestic Travel, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Confident Consumers Good Customers for Travel Service Providers
Table 8-25: Use of Travel Services, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Cruises Attract Anxious Consumers
Table 8-26: Cruise Ship Vacations, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers

CHAPTER 9 CONSUMER PROFILES: FASHION AND AUTOMOTIVE

Fashion

Confident Consumers Follow Fashion
Table 9-1: Attitudes toward Fashion, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Even Confident Consumers Cautious about Spending on Clothes
Table 9-2: Attitudes toward Buying Clothes, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Walmart and Target Top Choices for Anxious and Confident Consumers
Table 9-3: Department/Discount Stores Shopped in Last Three Months, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Store Brands of Women’s Lingerie More Popular among Anxious Consumers
Table 9-4: Percent Buying Store Brands for Women’s Lingerie, Anxious vs. Confident Women Consumers
Clothing Choices Analyzed
Table 9-5: Men’s Apparel and Accessories Purchased in Last 12 Months by Anxious and Confident Male Consumers
Table 9-6: Women’s Apparel and Accessories Purchased in Last 12 Months by Anxious and Confident Female Consumers
Confident Consumers More Likely to Buy Watches
Figure 9-1: Percent Buying Watch for Self or Others in Past 12 Months, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers

Automotive

Multiple Vehicles Common in Both Anxious and Confident Consumer Households
Table 9-7: Profile of Auto Owners, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Confident Consumers Drive Fast
Table 9-8: Attitudes toward Cars and Driving, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Options Catch Eye of Confident Consumers
Table 9-9: Reasons for Buying Cars, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
American Cars Get More Respect from Confident Consumers
Table 9-10: Attitudes toward Foreign and Domestic Cars, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Anxious Consumers Dial Back Expectations
Table 9-11: New and Used Cars, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Confident Consumers More Likely to Spend $30,000 or More for Cars
Table 9-12: Amount Spent and Method of Financing Most Recent Vehicle, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Confident Consumers Plan New Car Purchases in Near Future
Table 9-13: Next Vehicle Purchase, Anxious vs. Confident Consumers
Skip to top


Ask Your Question

The Post-Recession Consumer in the U.S.
Company name*:
Contact person*:
Phone/fax*:
Email*:
Request invoice
Your enquiry:
Please click on a Check Box below to confirm you are not a robot: