Near Field Communication (NFC) 2014-2024

Date: November 1, 2014
Pages: 222
Price:
US$ 3,495.00
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Publisher: IDTechEx Ltd
Report type: Strategic Report
Delivery: E-mail Delivery (PDF), Hard Copy Mail Delivery
ID: N21B9172A24EN
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Near Field Communication (NFC) 2014-2024

IDTechEx Team is on holiday from December 22th until January 5th, and the reports will not be dispatched during this period or will be dispatched with delay. We apologize for inconvenience.


Near Field Communication (NFC) is mainly useful in mobile phones and tablets for close range transactions/data exchange. The phone becomes an RFID reader or tag. It can read tags on bottles and posters. Over 200 million NFC-enabled mobile phones have recently been deployed: Manufacturers controlling 85% of the mobile phone and tablet market include it. This report critically looks at uses, forecasts, technology, global situation, competing technologies and timelines.

NFC could never be used in a major way until it was widely deployed in devices. In the last year that deployment has happened very rapidly. Now the questions are what will be the major applications? Who in the value chain will mainly benefit? The world's leading financial card companies, mobile phone operators, manufacturers, chip makers, consumer goods companies and others are intensely interested and investing strongly.

NFC is a set of short-range wireless technologies, typically requiring a distance of 4cm or less to initiate a connection partly because people do not trust making secure transactions at the longer distances typical with Bluetooth, WiFi and other short range radio protocols. The most popular mobile phone and tablet operating system is heavily committed to NFC.

Mobile phones continue to be by far the most important potential and actual focus of NFC; the technology is particularly suitable for them. The SIM card in your mobile phone is a smart card identifying your account to the network. On NFC phones, the SIM is being extended to act as the Secure Element that can hold other apps such as payment cards. For example, NFC allows you to share small packets of data between an NFC tag and an Android-powered device, or between two Android-powered devices. Most contactless point-of-sale payment systems use an NFC-compatible contactless interface and many of the world's transportation access systems are NFC compatible so considerable infrastructure is already in place for use by NFC-enabled devices. Although progress with transport systems and payments is slow.

Many trials of other potential uses of NFC continue to be created but they tend to be a poor indication of what happens at rollout. To say contactless cards are NFC is playing with words: they predate NFC and would succeed if NFC had never been invented.

This report examines the existing and future applications of NFC technology and the major players competing in the market, along with ten year market forecasts. It covers issues such as standardization, security and licensing, plus global progress split by country and key interviews from 2013.
1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS

2. INTRODUCTION

2.1. Definition and destination
  2.1.1. Background
  2.1.2. Stretchable Electronics
  2.1.3. Rollable electronics
  2.1.4. Foldable electronics
  2.1.5. Edible electronics
  2.1.6. Interactive paper
  2.1.7. Ubiquitous Sensor Networks
  2.1.8. Electronic packaging
  2.1.9. Conformal electronics / electronic wallpaper
  2.1.10. Wearable and very portable electronics
  2.1.11. Old concepts revisited - fault tolerant electronics, hard programmed electronics
  2.1.12. Electronics without circuits
2.2. The technical needs for printed electronics
  2.2.1. Replacing and enhancing conventional print
  2.2.2. Replacing the silicon chip
  2.2.3. Replacing conventional displays
  2.2.4. Replacing conventional lighting
  2.2.5. Transforming the human interface and new forms of safety and security
  2.2.6. New forms of amusement and merchandising
  2.2.7. New forms of drug delivery
  2.2.8. Products that are light, rugged and extremely low cost
2.3. Smart locations
2.4. Industries that need to collaborate
2.5. Value chain and life beyond plastic electronics
2.6. Interim products with silicon chips
2.7. Impediments to printed electronics

3. PRINTABLE CIRCUIT ELEMENTS

3.1. Substrates
3.2. Conductors
  3.2.1. Choice of conductors
  3.2.2. Printing with inks - the options
  3.2.3. Progress with conductive inks
3.3. Semiconductors

4. LOGIC AND MEMORY

4.1. Logic
  4.1.1. Transistor design
  4.1.2. Development path
  4.1.3. Company strategy and value chain
4.2. Memory

5. DISPLAYS

5.1. Display technologies
5.2. Non-emissive displays
  5.2.1. Thermochromic
  5.2.2. Electrochromic
  5.2.3. Electrophoretic
  5.2.4. Electrowetted displays
  5.2.5. Electrochemical displays on paper
5.3. Emissive displays
  5.3.1. AC Electroluminescent
  5.3.2. OLED

6. LIGHTING AND SIGNAGE

6.1. AC electroluminescent lighting
6.2. OLED lighting

7. POWER

7.1. Photovoltaics
7.2. Batteries
  7.2.1. Button batteries vs laminar batteries
  7.2.2. Choices of laminar battery
  7.2.3. Applications of laminar batteries
  7.2.4. Infinite Power Solutions
  7.2.5. Solicore, USA
  7.2.6. Blue Spark
  7.2.7. Rocket Electric
  7.2.8. Printed battery research
7.3. Fuel cells

8. SENSORS AND FILTERS

8.1. General situation and examples
8.2. Photodetector arrays
  8.2.1. Printed flexible scanners
8.3. Printing metamaterials

9. BROAD OVERVIEW OF TIMELINES AND MARKETS

9.1. General scenario to 2030
9.2. OLEDs
9.3. The big challenge - the emerging value chain is unbalanced

APPENDIX 1: IDTECHEX PUBLICATIONS AND CONSULTANCY

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Near Field Communication (NFC) 2014-2024
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