ICT Energy Efficiency: Commercial and Industrial

Date: April 1, 2010
Pages: 162
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Report type: Strategic Report
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ICT Energy Efficiency: Commercial and Industrial
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While global energy consumption is high and rising, conventional fuel sources are becoming increasingly scarce and expensive. Further, emissions resulting from the use of fossil fuels have been linked to global climate change and, within a rising number of countries, are subject to regulation. Consequently, governments, businesses and consumers around the world are seeking products and services to improve energy efficiency.

World marketed energy consumption was 462 quadrillion Btu in 2005. Going forward, global energy consumption is forecast to increase 19% between 2005 and 2015 to 551 quadrillion Btu. Conventional fuels such as oil and other liquid petroleum products, natural gas and coal are the world’s leading sources of energy.

Together, these sources are expected to account for approximately 85% of the world’s energy in 2010. Even considering the technological advancements and increasing penetration of renewable energy sources, the share of world energy supplied by conventional fuels is expected to remain flat to 2015. As fossil fuels, these resources are finite and current projections indicate that they will be depleted within a relatively short timeframe. Further, use of these fuels results in greenhouse gas emissions, which are linked to global climate change. Together with the fact that power generation using these sources is becoming increasingly expensive, current energy use patterns are unsustainable.

Products and services provided by the information and communications technology (ICT) sector enable energy efficiency and emissions reductions. ICTs can be employed to capture, analyze and respond to vast amounts of data which can lead to optimized energy use within large, energy-reliant sectors such as power, industry and logistics. Additionally, the adoption of ICT products and technologies can reduce energy consumption across sectors by enabling smart buildings, dematerialization and travel substitution. Meanwhile, various innovations and trends occurring within the ICT sector are expected to reduce the energy consumption of ICT products themselves.

The continued development and adoption of more efficient PCs and peripherals, data center servers and cooling technologies, telecommunications devices and infrastructure is expected to improve energy efficiency of products produced within the ICT sector. Globally, these improvements are projected to reduce the in-use energy consumption of ICT products by 895 billion kWh in 2015.

While substantial, the magnitude of these savings is dwarfed by the impact that the use of these enabling ICTs are projected to have across other sectors of human enterprise. The global energy savings enabled by ICTs in the power, industrial, and logistics sectors as well as through the cross-sectoral impact of enabling energy efficient buildings, travel substitution and dematerialization are estimated to exceed 6,463 billion kWh in 2015.

The overall global energy savings due to the improved energy efficiency of ICT products themselves as well as the efficiency enabling impact of these products across other energy intensive sectors and activities is therefore projected to grow from 2,618 billion kWh in 2010, to 7,358 billion kWh in 2015. These energy savings equate to 4.5% of projected global energy consumption in 2015.

Along with the reduction in global energy consumption, ICT products are also expected to enable significant reductions in global emissions. The global emissions reductions enabled by energy-smart ICT solutions are projected to grow from 1,393 million tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent in 2010 to 3,892 million tonnes in 2015. This reflects an 8.7% reduction in projected total global carbon emissions at that time.

The global value created through energy efficiency gains enabled by energy-smart ICT products and solutions across all sectors is projected to grow from $170 billion in 2010 to over $478 billion in 2015. Concurrently, the global value created through the potential monetization of emissions reductions is expected to reach $70 billion by 2015.

In the aggregate, the global value created through the energy and emissions savings estimated at $195 billion in 2010 and is expected to grow to $548 billion by 2015. This substantial value creation represents the impact of incremental adoption of energy-smart ICT products and solutions across several energy intensive sectors that are improving their energy efficiency relative to a 2005 baseline.

ICT Energy Efficiency: Commercial and Industrial includes a broad review of the global market for information and communications technologies which enable conservation of energy. The report examines opportunities for the ICT sector to improve the in-use energy efficiency of its products as well as the ability of the sectors’ products to enable energy efficiency across other sectors. Select ICTs which enable energy efficiency are discussed. These ICTs are categorized into 4 sectors: the ICT sector, power sector, logistics sector and industrial sector. Three cross-sector opportunities for efficiency enabling ICTs, buildings, dematerialization and travel substitution, are also discussed.

Report Methodology

The information in ICT Energy Efficiency: Commercial and Industrial is based on primary and secondary research. Primary research entailed interviews with firms involved in the manufacture, distribution and sales of ICT products, analysts and consultants to the energy industry to obtain insight into the products, technologies and market factors shaping the industry. Secondary research entailed data gathering from relevant sources, including government and industry publications, company literature and corporate annual reports.

What You’ll Get in This Report

ICT Energy Efficiency: Commercial and Industrial contains important insights and projections regarding the future of this market around the world. No other market research report provides both the comprehensive analysis and data that ICT Energy Efficiency: Commercial and Industrial offers. Subscribers will benefit from extensive data, presented in easy-to-read and practical charts, tables and graphs.

ICT Energy Efficiency: Commercial and Industrial includes a broad review of the global market for ICTs which are both energy efficient in themselves and enable energy conservation within various sectors of the global economy. The report outlines the need for improved energy efficiency and introduces several of the most significant opportunities to improve energy efficiency through the use of ICTs through 2015. Historic and forecast global energy demand 2005 to 2015 and energy demand drivers are presented.

Some of the most significant opportunities to improve energy efficiency through the use of ICTs through 2015 are identified and representative ICT products, technologies and requirements are discussed. Opportunities are presented by sector including the ICT, power, industrial and logistics sectors. Additionally, opportunities for ICTs to improve energy efficiency across sectors such as reducing the energy consumption of buildings, substitution of hard goods with electronic goods and travel substitution are discussed.

Finally, the market for energy efficient and efficiency-enabling ICTs is covered. Historic and forecast (2005-2015) energy consumption and carbon emissions for the various sectors and activities covered in this report are presented. Energy and emissions savings enabled by the ICTs discussed within the report and the value of these savings is offered. The report also provides profiles of participants in the market for energy-efficient and efficiency-enabling ICTs.

How You’ll Benefit from This Report

If your company is already doing business in the market for information and communication technologies which enable energy efficiency, or is considering entering the marketplace, you will find this report invaluable. It provides a comprehensive package of information and insight not offered in any other single source. You will gain a thorough understanding of the current global market for energy efficient and efficiency-enabling ICTs, as well as projected markets and trends through 2015.

This report will help:
  • Marketing managers understand the market forces shaping the market for information and communications technologies which enable energy efficiency and identify market opportunities.
  • Research and development professionals stay on top of competitor initiatives and explore demand for efficiency-enabling ICTs.
  • Business development executives understand the dynamics of the market and identify possible partnerships.
  • Information and research center librarians provide market researchers, product managers, and other colleagues with the vital information they need to do their jobs more effectively.

CHAPTER 1: EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Introduction
  Figure 1-1: World Marketed Energy Use by Fuel Type, 2005-2015 (in quadrillion Btu)
  Figure 1-2: Global ICT Energy Savings, 2015 (in Billion kWh)
  Figure 1-3: Global ICT-Enabled Energy and Emissions Reductions, All Sectors, 2006-2015 (in billion kWh and million tonnes CO2e)
  Figure 1-4: Global Value of ICT-Enabled Energy Efficiencies, All Sectors, 2006-2015 ($ billion)

Demand Drivers for Energy Efficient ICTs
  Figure 1-5: World Marketed Energy Consumption, 2005-2015 (in quadrillion Btu)
  Figure 1-6: World Population and Gross Domestic Product, 2005-2015 (in millions and $ billion)
  Figure 1-7: World Oil Prices, 1995-2015 (in 2007 USD per barrel)
  Table 1-1: Carbon Dioxide Emissions of Selected Fuel Types, 2010

Role of ICTs in Energy Efficiency
  ICT Sector
  Figure 1-8: Global ICT-Enabled Energy and Emissions Reductions, ICT Sector, 2006-2015 (in billion kWh and million tonnes CO2e)
  Power Sector
  Figure 1-9: Global ICT-Enabled Energy and Emissions Reductions, Power Sector, 2006-2015 (in billion kWh and million tonnes CO2e)
  Logistics Sector
  Figure 1-10: Global ICT-Enabled Energy and Emissions Reductions, Logistics Sector, 2006-2015 (in billion kWh and million tonnes CO2e)
  Industrial Sector
  Figure 1-11: Global ICT-Enabled Energy and Emissions Reductions, Industrial Sector, 2006-2015 (in billion kWh and million tonnes CO2e)
  Buildings
  Figure 1-12: Global ICT-Enabled Energy and Emissions Reductions, Buildings, 2006-2015 (in billion kWh and million tonnes CO2e)
  Dematerialization
  Figure 1-13: Global ICT-Enabled Energy and Emissions Reductions, Dematerialization, 2006-2015 (in billion kWh and million tonnes CO2e)
  Travel Substitution
  Figure 1-14: Global ICT-Enabled Energy and Emissions Reductions, Travel Substitution, 2006-2015 (in billion kWh and million tonnes CO2e)
  Conclusion

Report Scope
Report Format
Report Methodology
Abbreviations and Definitions
  Table 1-2: Abbreviations Utilized in Report

CHAPTER 2: DEMAND DRIVERS FOR ENERGY EFFICIENT ICTS >

Introduction
  Global Energy Demand
  Figure 2-1: World Marketed Energy Consumption, 2005-2015 (in quadrillion Btu)
  Table 2-1: Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development Member Countries, 2010
  Figure 2-2: World Marketed Energy Consumption by Economic Region, 2005-2015 (in quadrillion Btu)
  Figure 2-3: World Marketed Energy Consumption by Economic Sub-Region, 2005-2015 (in quadrillion Btu)

Energy Demand Drivers
  Population Growth
  Figure 2-4: World Population by Economic Region, 2005-2015 (in millions)
  Economic Growth
  Figure 2-5: World Gross Domestic Product by Economic Region, 2005-2015 (in $ billion)
  Global Energy Supply
  Figure 2-6: World Marketed Energy Use by Fuel Type, 2005-2015 (in quadrillion Btu)

Liquid Fuels
  Table 2-2: World’s Proved Oil Reserves, 2010
  Figure 2-7: World Oil Prices, 1995-2015 (in 2007 USD per barrel)

Coal
  Table 2-3: Top Five Producers of World Hard Coal, 2010

Natural Gas
  Table 2-4: World’s Proved Reserves of Natural Gas, 2010
  Energy Consumption and Emissions
  Table 2-5: Carbon Dioxide Emissions of Selected Fuel Types, 2010

Emissions Regulation
  Table 2-6: Kyoto Protocol Greenhouse Gas Emissions Targets (% change from 1990 level)

  Role of ICTs in Energy Efficiency
  ICT Sector
  Personal Computers and Peripherals
  Data centers
  Telecommunications

Power Sector
Logistics Sector
Industrial Sector
Buildings
Dematerialization
Travel Substitution
Conclusion

CHAPTER 3: ICT OPPORTUNITIES BY SECTOR

Introduction
ICT Sector
  Personal Computers & Peripherals
  Figure 3-1: Global Electricity Consumption and Carbon Emissions of PC/Peripherals, BAU, 2005-2015 (in billion kWh and million tonnes CO2e)
  Figure 3-2: Global Electricity Consumption of PC/Peripherals, Impact of Energy-Saving ICT Technologies, 2005-2015 (in billion kWh)
  Data Centers
  Figure 3-3: Global Electricity Consumption and Carbon Emissions of Data Centers, BAU, 2005-2015 (in billion kWh and million tonnes CO2e)
  Figure 3-4: Global Electricity Consumption of Data Centers, Impact of Energy-Saving ICT Technologies, 2005-2015 (in billion kWh)
  Telecommunications
  Figure 3-5: Global Electricity Consumption and Carbon Emissions of Telecommunications, BAU, 2005-2015 (in billion kWh and million tonnes CO2e)
  Figure 3-6: Global Electricity Consumption of Telecommunications, Impact of Energy-Saving ICT Technologies, 2005-2015 (in billion kWh)

Power Sector
  Figure 3-7: Global Electricity Production and Carbon Emissions of Power Sector, BAU, 2005-2015 (in billion kWh and million tonnes CO2e)
  Smart Grid
  Table 3-1: ICT Components of Smart Grid, 2010
  Integrated Communications
  Sensing and Measuring
  Smart Meters
  Smart Sensors
  Information Technology Hardware and Software
  Grid Visualization Technology
  Demand Response Technology
  Figure 3-8: Global Electricity Production of Power Sector, Impact of Energy-Saving ICT Technologies, 2005-2015 (in billion kWh)

Logistics Sector
  Figure 3-9: Global Energy Consumption and Carbon Emissions of Logistics Sector, BAU, 2005-2015 (in billion kWh and million tonnes CO2e)
  Distribution Network Optimization
  Route Optimization
  Eco Driving
  Table 3-2: Opportunities for ICT in Logistics, 2010
  Figure 3-10: Global Energy Consumption of Travel Related to Business and Commerce, Impact of Energy-Saving ICT Technologies, 2005-2015 (in billion kWh)

Industrial Sector
  Figure 3-11: Global Electricity Consumption and Carbon Emissions of Industrial Sector, BAU, 2005-2015 (in billion kWh and million tonnes CO2e)
  Smart Motor Systems
  Integrated Energy Management
  Figure 3-12: Global Electricity Consumption of Industrial Sector, Impact of Energy-Saving ICT Technologies, 2005-2015 (in billion kWh)

Buildings
  Figure 3-13: Global Energy Consumption and Carbon Emissions of Buildings, BAU, 2005-2015 (in billion kWh and million tonnes CO2e)
  Smart Building Design
  Table 3-3: Energy Modeling Software for Smart Building Design, 2010
  Smart Building Management
  Table 3-4: Opportunities for ICT in Building Management Systems, 2010
  Figure 3-14: Global Energy Consumption of Buildings, Impact of Energy-Saving ICT Technologies, 2005-2015 (in billion kWh)

Dematerialization
  Figure 3-15: Global Energy Consumption and Carbon Emissions of the Production of Physical Media, BAU, 2005-2015 (in billion kWh and million tonnes CO2e)
  Figure 3-16: Global Energy Consumption in the Production of Physical Media, Impact of Energy-Saving ICT Technologies, 2005-2015 (in billion kWh)

Travel Substitution
  Figure 3-17: Global Energy Consumption and Carbon Emissions of Travel Related to Business and Commerce, BAU, 2005-2015 (in billion kWh and million tonnes CO2e)
  Figure 3-18: Global Energy Consumption of Travel Related to Business and Commerce, Impact of Energy-Saving ICT Technologies, 2005-2015 (in billion kWh)

Conclusion

CHAPTER 4: MARKET SIZE AND GROWTH

Introduction
  Figure 4-1: World Marketed Energy Consumption, 2005-2015 (in quadrillion Btu)
  Figure 4-2: Global Energy and Emissions Footprint, ICT Sector, 2006-2015 (in billion kWh and million tonnes CO2e)
  Figure 4-3 Energy Savings Relative to 2005 Baseline Consumption, ICT Sector, 2005-2015 (in billion kWh)

ICT Sector
  Figure 4-4: Global ICT-Enabled Energy and Emissions Reductions, ICT Sector, 2006-2015 (in billion kWh and million tonnes CO2e)
  Figure 4-5: Global Value of Improved In-Use Energy Efficiency, ICT Sector, 2006-2015 ($ billion)

Power Sector
  Figure 4-6: Global ICT-Enabled Energy and Emissions Reductions, Power Sector, 2006-2015 (in billion kWh and million tonnes CO2e)
  Figure 4-7: Global value of ICT-Enabled Energy Efficiencies, Power Sector, 2006-2015 ($ billion)

Logistics Sector
  Figure 4-8: Global ICT-Enabled Energy and Emissions Reductions, Logistics Sector, 2006-2015 (in billion kWh and million tonnes CO2e)
  Figure 4-9: Global Value of ICT-Enabled Energy Efficiencies, Logistics Sector, 2006-2015 ($ billion)

Industrial Sector
  Figure 4-10: Global ICT-Enabled Energy and Emissions Reductions, Industrial Sector, 2006-2015 (in billion kWh and million tonnes CO2e)
  Figure 4-11: Global Value of ICT-Enabled Energy Efficiencies, Industrial Sector, 2006-2015 ($ billion)

Buildings
  Figure 4-12: Global Value of ICT-Enabled Energy Efficiencies, Buildings, 2006-2015 (in billion kWh and million tonnes CO2e)
  Figure 4-13: Global Value of ICT-Enabled Energy Efficiencies, Buildings, 2006-2015 ($ billion)

Dematerialization
  Figure 4-14: Global ICT-Enabled Energy and Emissions Reductions, Dematerialization, 2006-2015 (in billion kWh and million tonnes CO2e)
  Figure 4-15: Global Value of ICT-Enabled Energy Efficiencies, Dematerialization, 2006-2015 ($ billion)

Travel Substitution
  Figure 4-16: Global ICT-Enabled Energy and Emissions Reductions, Travel Substitution, 2006-2015 (in billion kWh and million tonnes CO2e)
  Figure 4-17: Global Value of ICT-Enabled Energy Efficiencies, Travel Substitution, 2006-2015 ($ billion)

Conclusion
  Figure 4-18: Global ICT Energy Savings, 2015 (in Billion kWh)
  Figure 4-19: Global ICT-Enabled Energy and Emissions Reductions, All Sectors, 2006-2015 (in billion kWh and million tonnes CO2e)
  Figure 4-20: Global Value of ICT-Enabled Energy Efficiencies, All Sectors, 2006-2015 ($ billion)
  Figure 4-21: Global Value of ICT Enabled Energy and Emissions Savings by Sector, 2015 (in $ Billion)

CHAPTER 5: PARTICIPANT PROFILES

Introduction
  Table 5-1: Description of Companies Profiled
  Table 5-2: Energy Efficiency Improvement/CO2 Reduction Commitments of Companies Profiled

Alstom
  Table 5-3: Alstom Profile
  Corporate Background
  Product Portfolio
  Energy Efficient Innovation
  Performance
  Figure 5-1: Alstom Power Sector Revenues, 2005-2009 (€ million)
  Acquisitions and Divestitures
  Personnel Changes

Cooper Power Systems, Incorporated
  Table 5-4: Cooper Power Systems, Incorporated Profile
  Corporate Background
  Product Portfolio
  Table 5-5: Cooper Power Systems, Incorporated Brand and Product Portfolio
  Table 5-6: Cooper Power Systems, Incorporated EAS Group Solutions Portfolio
  Energy Efficient Innovation
  Performance
  Figure 5-2: Cooper Industries Revenues, 2005-2009 ($ million)
  Acquisitions and Divestitures
  Personnel Changes

Ericsson
  Table 5-7: Ericsson Profile
  Corporate Background
  Product Portfolio
  The company’s core business is to provide
  Figure 5-3: Ericsson Sales by Product Category, 2009 (in % total revenue)
  Energy Efficient Innovation
  Performance
  Figure 5-4: Ericsson Revenues, 2005-2009 (SEK million)
  Acquisitions and Divestitures
  Personnel Changes

Johnson Controls, Incorporated
  Table 5-8: Johnson Controls, Incorporated Profile
  Corporate Background
  Product Portfolio
  Figure 5-5: Johnson Controls Sales by Product Category, 2009 (in % total revenue)
  Energy Efficient Innovation
  Table 5-9: Johnson Controls Environmental Scorecard
  Performance
  Figure 5-6: Johnson Controls, Incorporated Revenues, 2005-2009 ($ million)
  Acquisitions and Divestitures
  Personnel Changes

Hewlett-Packard Company
  Table 5-10: Hewlett-Packard Company Profile
  Corporate Background
  Product Portfolio
  Services
  Enterprise Storage and Servers (ESS)
  HP Software
  Personal Systems Group (PSG)
  Imaging and Printing Group (IPG)
  HP Financial Services (HPFS)
  Corporate Investments
  Energy Efficient Innovation
  Performance
  Figure 5-7: Hewlett-Packard Company Revenues, 2005-2009 ($ million)
  Acquisitions and Divestitures
  Personnel Changes

Manhattan Associates
  Table 5-11: Manhattan Associates Profile
  Corporate Background
  Product Portfolio
  Table 5-12: Manhattan Associates’ Manhattan SCOPET Solutions and Technology Portfolio
  Energy Efficient Innovation
  Performance
  Figure 5-8: Manhattan Associates Revenues, 2005-2009 ($ thousand)
  Acquisitions and Divestitures
  Personnel Changes

APPENDIX: Selected Corporate Addresses

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