The Future of E-Mobility and Commercial Electrification

Date: April 22, 2011
Pages: 142
Price:
US$ 2,875.00
Publisher: Business Insights
Report type: Strategic Report
Delivery: E-mail Delivery (PDF)
ID: F6DF0E82470EN
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The Future of E-Mobility and Commercial Electrification
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Introduction

With the impetus behind the e-mobility sector growing, the focus is increasingly turning towards the infrastructure requirements needed to make the sector a success.

This report looks at the growth of this sector and how this will impact the infrastructure landscape for major stake-holders such as government, public bodies and utilities.

Features and benefits
  • Analyze the infrastructure requirements for expanded e-mobility.
  • Assess cost forecasts for the roll-out of e-mobility infrastructure.
  • Highlight the increased power capacity needed for the expansion of e-mobility.
  • Comprehend the level of penetration of Electric Vehicles be over the next 20 years.
  • Realize the changing e-mobility landscape over the next 20 years.
Highlights

Utilities will not have to invest significantly in capacity expansion to accommodate EVs.

EV penetration rates are expected to remain quite low over the next two decades.

Public sector support will be needed for the roll-out of a comprehensive charging network.

Your key questions answered
  • What are the major benefits and drawbacks to increased e-mobility?
  • Can e-mobility work without government support?
  • What are the key business models for companies operating in this sector?
  • How are utilities preparing for increased e-mobility?
  • How will increased e-mobility impact power generation and transmission?
Housely Carr
Disclaimer
Executive summary
Drivers for expanded e-mobility
Major electric vehicle manufacturers
Infrastructure needed to support e-mobility
Government policies and incentives for e-mobility
Costs and benefits of expanded e-mobility
Companies with aggressive e-mobility plans
Future outlook

CHAPTER 1 DRIVERS FOR EXPANDED E-MOBILITY

Summary
The shift toward a lower-carbon mobility sector
Climate change, air quality concerns
GHG action varies around the globe
E-mobility - a useful tool to fight GHG emissions
Transport dominates emissions
Dependence on foreign oil
Growing market in China
E-mobility as economic development driver
Strong support from electric utilities
E-mobility subsidies now; lower costs in the long term
Significant hurdles to e-mobility remain

CHAPTER 2 MAJOR ELECTRIC VEHICLE MANUFACTURERS

Summary
Introduction
Electric cars
Growth factors
Major electric car manufacturers
Commercial vehicles
Price and efficiency of EVs
EVs represent cost premium
Utility investment in EVs

CHAPTER 3 INFRASTRUCTURE NEEDED TO SUPPORT E-MOBILITY

Summary
Introduction
Charging options
Cost of charging
Residential charging most cost-effective
Different approaches to developing infrastructure
Which manufacturers are best placed?
Charging technology
Utilities supporting charger roll-out
Current charging networks
Charging networks in the US
Are national electric grids ready for e-mobility?
How are utilities adapting?
California leads the way
How much new generation capacity will need to be built?
EVs won’t cause spike in power demand
EVs penetration projections
European power generation
Fleet vehicle electrification
Advantages of electric feet vehicles
Infrastructure for fleet vehicles
Total infrastructure investment
Hydrogen charging infrastructure
Fuel cell technology could be the future

CHAPTER 4 GOVERNMENT POLICIES AND INCENTIVES

Summary
Introduction
US
The American Clean Energy and Security Act also outlines investment
EVs to spur economic growth in Europe?
Asia pioneering EVs
Chinese EV market set for lift off
Indian potential for two-wheelers
Japan pushing past the Prius

CHAPTER 5 COSTS AND BENEFITS OF EXPANDED E-MOBILITY

Summary
Costs of expanded e-mobility
Greater up-front capital investment
Component costs are the biggest barrier
Reducing battery costs
The charging market develops
Component prices are falling
Scarcity of raw materials is a real concern
Support infrastructure expense
Electrical infrastructure costs
Utility involvement in EV charging
Uncertainties regarding longevity, reliability
The drawbacks of EVs
Benefits of expanded e-mobility
Expanded market for electricity (for utilities)
Optimized use of electric grids (for utilities)
Increased energy efficiency
Reduced energy costs
Compliance with air quality, climate change mandates
Reduced CO2 emissions from EVs
Tax incentives are favorable towards EVs
Registration/purchase taxes
Circulation/motor taxes
Fuel taxes
Congestion charging

CHAPTER 6 COMPANIES WITH AGGRESSIVE E-MOBILITY PLANS

British Gas (UK)
ESB (Ireland)
EDF Energy (UK)
EDF Group (France)
EDF major player with fleet vehicles
EnBW (Germany)
RWE (Germany)
Vattenfall (Sweden, Germany)
Endesa (Spain)
State Grid Corporation (China)
Enel
Other stakeholders
Siemens
Coulomb Technologies
Better Place
Elektromotive
General Electric (GE)
Countries with aggressive e-mobility plans
European Union planning to standardize
Austria aggressively expanding e-mobility
Germany - e-mobility pioneer
France providing EV funding
The United Kingdom (UK) is building an EV network around London
Amsterdam to lead the way in the Netherlands

CHAPTER 7 FUTURE OUTLOOK

Summary
Introduction
Sales of electricity/equipment
Smart grid
Current capacity in sufficient
Slow roll-out of EVs
Investment in transmission & distribution
Investment in charging infrastructure
Appendix
Companies mentioned in the report
Glossary/Abbreviations
Bibliography/References

TABLE OF FIGURES

Figure 1: Global energy related CO2 missions (bn metric tons)
Figure 2: Tank-to-wheel gasoline equivalent (GE) fuel consumption, (gCO2e/km), 2008
Figure 3: US oil imports December (bls ‘000), 2009
Figure 4: Electric vehicle sales forecast (units) 2010-2015
Figure 5: Tank-to-wheel energy use forecasts (MJ/km), 2035
Figure 6: Three levels of electric charging, 2011
Figure 7: GE WattStation, 2011
Figure 8: Paris EV charging network, 2008
Figure 9: Net global electricity generation/consumption 1990-2035 (Index 1990=1.00)
Figure 10: Evolution of the smart grid, 2011
Figure 11: Forecast incidence of the electric power request by the EV fleet to 2030, 2010
Figure 12: Fleet vehicles by type (%), 2009
Figure 13: Better Place’s Californian deployment of exchange stations, 2008
Figure 14: Forecasted cost of a typical EV battery ($), 2010-2030
Figure 15: Characteristics for diffusion of new technology, 2010
Figure 16: Requirements for expanded e-mobility infrastructure, 2011
Figure 17: ESB main charge-point deployment 2010
Figure 18: Responsibilities of the GV4 consortium
Figure 19: RWE future energy grid, 2010
Figure 20: Elektrobay software program, 2010
Figure 21: US EIA Energy Outlook EV unit forecasts by year (‘000)

TABLE OF TABLES

Table 1: Global energy related CO2 missions (bn metric tons)
Table 2: Tank-to-wheel gasoline equivalent (GE) fuel consumption (gCO2e/km), 2008
Table 3: US oil imports December (bls ‘000), 2009
Table 4: Electric vehicle sales forecast (units) 2010-2015
Table 5: Major electric cars 2009-2011
Table 6: Major commercial electric vehicles releases, 2011
Table 7: Tank-to-wheel energy use forecasts (MJ/km), 2035
Table 8: Electric vehicle cost premium over conventional vehicle, 2010
Table 9: Estimated charging unit costs by level, 2010
Table 10: Public/Private EV infrastructure models, 2011
Table 11: Net global electricity generation/consumption 1990-2035 (Index 1990=1.00), Part 1
Table 12: Net global electricity generation/consumption 1990-2035 (Index 1990=1.00), Part 2
Table 13: Forecast incidence of the electric power request by the EV fleet to 2030, 2010
Table 14: Total EV sales forecast 2010-2035 (m)
Table 15: Major EV incentive programs by US state, 2011
Table 16: Major European incentive schemes for EVs, 2011
Table 17: Forecasted cost of a typical EV battery ($), 2010-2030
Table 18: US EIA Energy Outlook EV unit forecasts by year (‘000) 2015-2030
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