The US State by State Electricity Market Outlook

Date: December 22, 2010
Pages: 208
Price:
US$ 2,875.00
Publisher: Business Insights
Report type: Strategic Report
Delivery: E-mail Delivery (PDF)
ID: U58380C6957EN
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The US State by State Electricity Market Outlook
The US cumulative installed power generation capacity grew at a CAGR of 2.9% during 1998–2008, mainly driven by 10 states. These states accounted for 52% of the total growth in cumulative installed power generation capacity in the US during 1998-2008. Most of the states in the US are experiencing three major trends in their electricity markets, which include growing investments in renewables due to the Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) mandate, investments in clean coal technologies, or investments in building or expanding natural gas infrastructure primarily to tap recent discoveries of enormous recoverable shale gas reserves.

Scope of this research
  • Gain knowledge of the US electricity market with respect to market segmentation, regulatory framework, installed capacity, growth, power generation.
  • Achieve a comprehensive understanding of divisions and states that are driving power growth in the US.
  • Analyze the trends shaping up in each division in the US along with their drivers and potential impact on electricity market.
  • Identify the key divisions and states likely to drive the growth in power generation capacity along with their respective projected capacity.
  • Enhance understanding on the future of the US electricity market with respect to projected installed capacity and projected energy mix.
Research and analysis highlights

In 2008, the West South Central division accounted for 16.5% of cumulative installed power generation capacity in the US and was the second largest division after the South Atlantic division.

Texas was the largest state in the division in terms of both installed capacity as well as power demand due to its dense population and high oil and natural gas production.

The cumulative power generation capacity in the US is expected to grow at a CAGR of 1.5% during 2008–13. South Atlantic, West South Central, and East North Central divisions are likely to be key drivers for capacity growth in the US during the specified period.

Key reasons to purchase this research
  • What is the current scenario of the US electricity market?
  • Which divisions and states are leading in terms of installed capacity and power generation?
  • Which divisions and states are leading in renewables?
  • What are the key trends in each division in the US and how is it affecting the US electricity market as a whole?
  • What is the future outlook for the US electricity market and which divisions and states will likely drive its growth

Disclaimer
Executive summary
Market overview
South Atlantic division
West South Central division
East North Central division
Pacific Contiguous division
Middle Atlantic division
East South Central division
Mountain division
West North Central division
New England division
Pacific Noncontiguous division
Conclusion
Preface
Report scope
Market segmentation
Cumulative installed power generation capacity
Power generation
Renewables

CHAPTER 1 MARKET OVERVIEW

Summary
US electricity market overview
Installed capacity and growth
Generation
Key Trends
State-level RPS drives growth of renewables
Developing clean-coal technologies
Increasing role of natural gas
Economics of power generation in the US

CHAPTER 2 SOUTH ATLANTIC DIVISION

Summary
Overview
Installed capacity and growth
Generation
Major players
Key trends
North Carolina, Florida, Maryland, Georgia and the District of Columbia increasing energy efficiency
Florida, North Carolina and Georgia replacing ageing coal plants
Outlook for the South Atlantic division

CHAPTER 3 WEST SOUTH CENTRAL DIVISION

Summary
Overview
Installed capacity and growth
Generation
Major players
Key trends
Benefits drive power generators in Texas to implement CCS technology
Texas utilities promote energy efficiency as Public Utility Commission (PUC) raises efficiency mandates
Growing shale gas production in Texas to improve gas supply to power generators
Outlook for the West South Central division

CHAPTER 4 EAST NORTH CENTRAL DIVISION

Summary
Overview
Installed capacity and growth
Generation
Major players
Key trends
Illinois, Indiana, and Wisconsin investing in clean-coal technologies
Michigan and Ohio developing unconventional shale gas infrastructure
Outlook for the East North Central division

CHAPTER 5 PACIFIC CONTIGUOUS DIVISION

Summary
Overview
Installed capacity and growth
Generation
Major players
Key trends
California using depleted gas reservoirs to provide enhance supply security
California capitalizing on high solar power potential
Outlook for the Pacific Contiguous division

CHAPTER 6 MIDDLE ATLANTIC DIVISION

Summary
Overview
Installed capacity and growth
Generation
Major players
Key trends
New York and New Jersey increasing investments in renewables
Pennsylvania and New York optimistic for natural gas-based power generation
Pennsylvania and New York investing considerably in energy efficiency
Outlook for the Middle Atlantic division

CHAPTER 7 EAST SOUTH CENTRAL DIVISION

Summary
Overview
Installed capacity and growth
Generation
Major Players
Key Trend
Kentucky investing in carbon capture and storage
Outlook for the East South Central division

CHAPTER 8 MOUNTAIN DIVISION

Summary
Overview
Installed capacity and growth
Generation
Major Players
Key trends
Mountain division exploiting rich solar potential
Outlook for the Mountain division

CHAPTER 9 WEST NORTH CENTRAL DIVISION

Summary
Overview
Installed capacity and growth
Generation
Major players
Key trends
Rich resources and state initiatives driving wind power growth in Iowa and North Dakota
Minnesota and Kansas investing in repowering and retrofitting coal plants
Outlook for the West North Central division

CHAPTER 10 NEW ENGLAND DIVISION

Summary
Overview
Installed capacity
Generation
Major Players
Key trend
New England investing in cleaner and greener energy
Outlook for the New England division

CHAPTER 11 PACIFIC NONCONTIGUOUS DIVISION

Summary
Overview
Installed capacity and growth
Generation
Major players
Key trends
Hawaii increasing the share of renewables
Alaska building natural gas storage to enhance supply to utilities
Outlook for the Pacific Noncontiguous division

CHAPTER 12 CONCLUSION

Summary
Short-term power outlook in the US
Long-term power outlook in the US
Glossary/Abbreviations

APPENDIX

Abbreviations list of the US states

TABLE OF FIGURES

Figure 1: Electricity market segmentation by the US EIA, 2010
Figure 2: US top 20 states by cumulative installed power generation capacity 2008 (MW), 2010
Figure 3: US top 20 states by power generation 2009 (GWh), 2010
Figure 4: US top 10 states by cumulative installed renewables power generation capacity 2004–08 (MW), 2010
Figure 5: Electricity deregulated states in the US, 2010
Figure 6: Cumulative installed power generation capacity in the US 1998–2008 (MW), 2010
Figure 7: Total installed power generation capacity by source in the US 2008 (%), 2010
Figure 8: Electricity generation in the US 1998–2010 (GWh), 2010
Figure 9: States following RPS in the US, 2010
Figure 10: Levelized power generation and installation cost in the US, 2009
Figure 11: Cumulative installed power generation capacity in South Atlantic 1998–2008 (MW), 2010
Figure 12: Total installed power generation capacity by source in South Atlantic 2008 (MW), 2010
Figure 13: Electricity generation in South Atlantic 1998–2010 (GWh), 2010
Figure 14: Top 10 utilities by retail power supply in South Atlantic 2008 (%), 2010
Figure 15: Projected cumulative power generation capacity in South Atlantic 2008–13 (MW), 2010
Figure 16: South Atlantic projected additional power generation capacity by type 2008–13 (%), 2010
Figure 17: Cumulative installed power generation capacity in West South Central 1998–2008 (MW), 2010
Figure 18: Total installed power generation capacity by source in West South Central 2008 (MW), 2010
Figure 19: Electricity generation in West South Central 1998–2010 (GWh), 2010
Figure 20: Top 10 utilities by retail power supply in West South Central 2008 (%), 2010
Figure 21: Gas production from Barnett shale in Texas 2004–09 (tcf), 2010
Figure 22: Projected cumulative power generation capacity in West South Central 2008–13 (MW), 2010
Figure 23: West South Central projected additional power generation capacity by type 2008–13 (%), 2010
Figure 24: Cumulative installed power generation capacity in East North Central 1998–2008 (MW), 2010
Figure 25: Total installed power generation capacity by source in East North Central 2008 (MW), 2010
Figure 26: Electricity generation in East North Central 1998–2010 (GWh), 2010
Figure 27: Top 10 utilities by retail power supply in East North Central 2008 (%), 2010
Figure 28: Map of Collingwood Shale reserve in Michigan, 2010
Figure 29: Projected cumulative power generation capacity in East North Central 2008–13 (MW), 2010
Figure 30: East North Central projected additional power generation capacity by type 2008–13 (%), 2010
Figure 31: Cumulative installed power generation capacity in Pacific Contiguous 1998–2008 (MW), 2010
Figure 32: Total installed power generation capacity by source in Pacific Contiguous 2008 (MW), 2010
Figure 33: Electricity generation in Pacific Contiguous 1998–2010 (GWh), 2010
Figure 34: Top 10 utilities by retail power supply in Pacific Contiguous 2008 (%), 2010
Figure 35: Projected cumulative power generation capacity in Pacific Contiguous 2008–13 (MW), 2010
Figure 36: Pacific Contiguous projected additional power generation capacity by type 2008–13 (%), 2010
Figure 37: Cumulative installed power generation capacity in Middle Atlantic 1998–2008 (MW), 2010
Figure 38: Total installed power generation capacity by source in Middle Atlantic 2008 (MW), 2010
Figure 39: Electricity generation in Middle Atlantic 1998–2010 (GWh), 2010
Figure 40: Top 10 utilities by retail power supply in Middle Atlantic 2008 (%), 2010
Figure 41: Map of Marcellus shale formation in Middle Atlantic, 2010
Figure 42: Projected cumulative power generation capacity in Middle Atlantic 2008–13 (MW), 2010
Figure 43: Middle Atlantic projected additional power generation capacity by type 2008–13 (%), 2010
Figure 44: Cumulative installed power generation capacity in East South Central 1998–2008 (MW), 2010
Figure 45: Total installed power generation capacity by source in East South Central 2008 (MW), 2010
Figure 46: Electricity generation in East South Central 1998–2010 (GWh), 2010
Figure 47: Top 10 utilities by retail power supply in East South Central 2008 (%), 2010
Figure 48: Projected cumulative power generation capacity in East South Central 2008–13 (MW), 2010
Figure 49: East Couth Central projected additional power generation capacity by type 2008–13 (%), 2010
Figure 50: Cumulative installed power generation capacity in Mountain 1998–2008 (MW), 2010
Figure 51: Total installed power generation capacity by source in Mountain 2008 (MW), 2010
Figure 52: Electricity generation in Mountain 1998–2010 (GWh), 2010
Figure 53: Top 10 utilities by retail power supply in Mountain 2008 (%), 2010
Figure 54: Projected cumulative power generation capacity in Mountain 2008–13 (MW), 2010
Figure 55: Mountain projected additional power generation capacity by type 2008–13 (%), 2010
Figure 56: Cumulative installed power generation capacity in West North Central 1998–2008 (MW), 2010
Figure 57: Total installed power generation capacity by source in West North Central 2008 (MW), 2010
Figure 58: Electricity generation in West North Central 1998–2010 (GWh), 2010
Figure 59: Top 10 utilities by retail power supply in West North Central 2008 (%), 2010
Figure 60: Wind potential map in North Dakota and Iowa, 2009
Figure 61: Projected cumulative power generation capacity in West North Central 2008–13 (MW), 2010
Figure 62: West North Central projected additional power generation capacity by type 2008–13 (%), 2010
Figure 63: Cumulative installed power generation capacity in New England 1998–2008 (MW), 2010
Figure 64: Total installed power generation capacity by source in New England 2008 (MW), 2010
Figure 65: Electricity generation in New England 1998–2010 (GWh), 2010
Figure 66: Top 10 utilities by retail power supply in New England 2008 (%), 2010
Figure 67: Assessment of New England’s renewable energy demand by 2020 (%), 2010
Figure 68: Projected cumulative power generation capacity in New England 2008–13 (MW), 2010
Figure 69: New England projected additional power generation capacity by type 2008–13 (%), 2010
Figure 70: Cumulative installed power generation capacity in Pacific Noncontiguous 1998–2008 (MW), 2010
Figure 71: Total installed power generation capacity by source in Pacific Noncontiguous 2008 (MW), 2010
Figure 72: Electricity generation in Pacific Noncontiguous 1998–2010 (GWh), 2010
Figure 73: Top 10 utilities by retail power supply in Pacific Noncontiguous 2008 (%), 2010
Figure 74: Projected cumulative power generation capacity in Pacific Noncontiguous 2008–13 (MW), 2010
Figure 75: Pacific Noncontiguous projected additional power generation capacity by type 2008–13 (%), 2010
Figure 76: Projected cumulative power generation capacity in the US 2008–13 (MW), 2010
Figure 77: US projected additional power generation capacity by type 2008–13 (%), 2010
Figure 78: Projected cumulative power generation capacity in the US 2008–2035 (GW), 2010
Figure 79: US projected additional power generation capacity by type 2008–35 (%), 2010

TABLE OF TABLES

Table 1: Cumulative installed power generation capacity by state 1998–2008 Part 1 (MW), 2010
Table 2: Cumulative installed power generation capacity by state 1998–2008 Part 2 (MW), 2010
Table 3: Power generation by state 1998–2009 (GWh), 2010
Table 4: Power generation by state 1998–2009 (GWh), 2010
Table 5: US top 10 states by cumulative installed renewables power generation capacity 2004–08 (MW), 2010
Table 6: Cumulative installed power generation capacity in the US 1998–2008 (MW), 2010
Table 7: Total installed power generation capacity by source in the US 2008 (MW), 2010
Table 8: Electricity generation in the US 1998–2010 (GWh), 2010
Table 9: Levelized power generation and installation cost in the US, 2009
Table 10: Cumulative installed power generation capacity in South Atlantic 1998–2008 (MW), 2010
Table 11: Total installed power generation capacity by source in South Atlantic 2008 (MW), 2010
Table 12: Electricity generation in South Atlantic 1998–2010 (GWh), 2010
Table 13: Top 10 utilities by retail power supply in South Atlantic 2008 (GWh), 2010
Table 14: Projected cumulative power generation capacity in South Atlantic 2008–13 (MW), 2010
Table 15: South Atlantic projected additional power generation capacity by type 2008–13 (MW), 2010
Table 16: Cumulative installed power generation capacity in West South Central 1998–2008 (MW), 2010
Table 17: Total installed power generation capacity by source in West South Central 2008 (MW), 2010
Table 18: Electricity generation in West South Central 1998–2010 (GWh), 2010
Table 19: Top 10 utilities by retail power supply in West South Central 2008 (GWH), 2010
Table 20: gas production from Barnett shale in Texas 2004–09 (tcf), 2010
Table 21: Projected cumulative power generation capacity in West South Central 2008–13 (MW), 2010
Table 22: West South Central projected additional power generation capacity by type 2008–13 (MW), 2010
Table 23: Cumulative installed power generation capacity in East North Central 1998–2008 (MW), 2010
Table 24: Total installed power generation capacity by source in East North Central 2008 (MW), 2010
Table 25: Electricity generation in East North Central 1998–2010 (GWh), 2010
Table 26: Top 10 utilities by retail power supply in East North Central 2008 (GWh), 2010
Table 27: Projected cumulative power generation capacity in East North Central 2008–13 (MW), 2010
Table 28: East North Central projected additional power generation capacity by type 2008–13 (MW), 2010
Table 29: Cumulative installed power generation capacity in Pacific Contiguous 1998–2008 (MW), 2010
Table 30: Total installed power generation capacity by source in Pacific Contiguous 2008 (MW), 2010
Table 31: Electricity generation in Pacific Contiguous 1998–2010 (GWh), 2010
Table 32: Top 10 utilities by retail power supply in Pacific Contiguous 2008 (GWh), 2010
Table 33: Top 10 announced CSP projects in California, 2010
Table 34: Projected cumulative power generation capacity in Pacific Contiguous 2008–13 (MW), 2010
Table 35: Pacific Contiguous projected additional power generation capacity by type 2008–13 (MW), 2010
Table 36: Cumulative installed power generation capacity in Middle Atlantic 1998–2008 (MW), 2010
Table 37: Total installed power generation capacity by source in Middle Atlantic 2008 (MW), 2010
Table 38: Electricity generation in Middle Atlantic 1998–2010 (GWh), 2010
Table 39: Top 10 utilities by retail power supply in Middle Atlantic 2008 (GWh), 2010
Table 40: Projected cumulative power generation capacity in Middle Atlantic 2008–13 (MW), 2010
Table 41: Middle Atlantic projected additional power generation capacity by type 2008–13 (MW), 2010
Table 42: Cumulative installed power generation capacity in East South Central 1998–2008 (MW), 2010
Table 43: Total installed power generation capacity by source in East South Central 2008 (MW), 2010
Table 44: Electricity generation in East South Central 1998–2010 (GWh), 2010
Table 45: Top 10 utilities by retail power supply in East South Central 2008 (GWh), 2010
Table 46: Projected cumulative power generation capacity in East South Central 2008–13 (MW), 2010
Table 47: East Couth Central projected additional power generation capacity by type 2008–13 (MW), 2010
Table 48: Cumulative installed power generation capacity in Mountain 1998–2008 (MW), 2010
Table 49: Total installed power generation capacity by source in Mountain 2008 (MW), 2010
Table 50: Electricity generation in Mountain 1998–2010 (GWh), 2010
Table 51: Top 10 utilities by retail power supply in Mountain 2008 (GWh), 2010
Table 52: Top 7 US states by solar power potential (GW), 2008
Table 53: Major announced solar projects in Mountain division, 2010
Table 54: Projected cumulative power generation capacity in Mountain 2008–13 (MW), 2010
Table 55: Mountain projected additional power generation capacity by type 2008–13 (MW), 2010
Table 56: Cumulative installed power generation capacity in West North Central 1998–2008 (MW), 2010
Table 57: Total installed power generation capacity by source in West North Central 2008 (MW), 2010
Table 58: Electricity generation in West North Central 1998–2010 (GWh), 2010
Table 59: Top 10 utilities by retail power supply in West North Central 2008 (GWh), 2010
Table 60: Projected cumulative power generation capacity in West North Central 2008–13 (MW), 2010
Table 61: West North Central projected additional power generation capacity by type 2008–13 (MW), 2010
Table 62: Cumulative installed power generation capacity in New England 1998–2008 (MW), 2010
Table 63: Total installed power generation capacity by source in New England 2008 (MW), 2010
Table 64: Electricity generation in New England 1998–2010 (GWh), 2010
Table 65: Top 10 utilities by retail power supply in New England 2008 (GWh), 2010
Table 66: Assessment of New England’s renewable energy demand by 2020 (GWh), 2010
Table 67: Projected cumulative power generation capacity in New England 2008–13 (MW), 2010
Table 68: New England projected additional power generation capacity by type 2008–13 (MW), 2010
Table 69: Cumulative installed power generation capacity in Pacific Noncontiguous 1998–2008 (MW), 2010
Table 70: Total installed power generation capacity by source in Pacific Noncontiguous 2008 (MW), 2010
Table 71: Electricity generation in Pacific Noncontiguous 1998–2010 (GWh), 2010
Table 72: Top 10 utilities by retail power supply in Pacific Noncontiguous 2008 (GWh), 2010 Utility
Table 73: Projected cumulative power generation capacity in Pacific Noncontiguous 2008–13 (MW), 2010
Table 74: Pacific Noncontiguous projected additional power generation capacity by type 2008–13 (MW), 2010
Table 75: Projected cumulative power generation capacity in the US 2008–13 (MW), 2010
Table 76: US projected additional power generation capacity by type 2008–13 (MW), 2010
Table 77: Projected cumulative power generation capacity in the US 2008–2035 (GW), 2010
Table 78: US projected additional power generation capacity by type 2008–35 (GW), 2010
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