The US Electricity Transmission and Distribution Market Outlook

Date: December 22, 2010
Pages: 112
Price:
US$ 2,875.00
Publisher: Business Insights
Report type: Strategic Report
Delivery: E-mail Delivery (PDF)
ID: U40FB360A61EN
Leaflet:

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The US Electricity Transmission and Distribution Market Outlook
The US electric transmission and distribution network is a complex composition of lines that traverse around 365,000 circuit miles to supply electricity to the nation. The majority of the existing transmission infrastructure was put in place in the 1950’s and 1960’s and according to the US Department of Energy, around 70% of the power transformers are over 25 years old and around 60% of the circuit-breakers are 25 years old. This is causing bottlenecks for transmission operators to efficiently supply electricity to consumers.

Scope of this research
  • Comprehend the US electricity transmission and distribution market with respect to issues that are shaping up the industry.
  • Achieve an understanding of government support provided to various states in the US to enhance transmission and distribution within the power market.
  • Analyze activities that are driving and factors that are deterring renewable power integration into the grid.
  • Explore insight into the smart grid, its functionality, the key players involved, growth drivers and challenges.
  • Understand the future of the US electricity transmission and distribution market:- planned construction of transmission lines; electricity capacity.
Research and analysis highlights

Installed power generation capacity in the US grew at a CAGR of 1.9% from 783GW in 1990 to 1,104GW in 2008. The highest growth in additional capacity was recorded during 2000–2005 primarily due to an improved financial environment aiding the easy availability of credit, coupled with demand from an increase in industrial activities.

Generation from renewables in the US grew at a CAGR of 2% from 351,485GWh in 2004 to 381,044GWh in 2008, primarily driven by growth in Washington and California. The top 10 states in the US contribute 69.2% of the total renewable power generation in the country.

Implementing demand response that has an impact on reducing peak load requires support technology. Some of the key technologies enabling demand response include thermostats, interval meters, energy management systems, dynamic lighting controls and dynamic energy storage systems.

Key reasons to purchase this research
  • What is the current scenario of the US electricity transmission and distribution?
  • How are the strategies of major players helping integrate renewable power in to the grid?
  • What are the strategies of major players in the US for the growth of demand response?
  • Which is the top state currently implementing smart grid technology on a large scale?
  • Which energy storage technologies are currently used or are under development?

Disclaimer
Executive summary
Market overview
Integration of renewables
Demand response
Smart grid
Energy storage
Future outlook

CHAPTER 1 MARKET OVERVIEW

Summary
Installed power generation capacity
Electricity generation
US electricity transmission and distribution
Key players
Drivers of US transmission and distribution
Growth of renewable power generation capacity
Ageing transmission infrastructure
Resistors against US transmission and distribution
Cost challenges
Siting issues

CHAPTER 2 INTEGRATION OF RENEWABLES

Summary
Overview of renewable energy in the US
Installed capacity
Electricity generation
Renewable resources in the US
Wind power
Solar
Geothermal
Biomass
Strategies of major players in renewables integration
Building new transmission and distribution infrastructure
Installing intelligent grid systems
Challenges in renewables integration
Intermittency
Remote location of electricity generation
Absence of a nationwide renewable policy and resulting uncertainty

CHAPTER 3 DEMAND RESPONSE

Summary
Overview of demand response and its programs
Demand response programs
Price-base demand response
Incentive demand response programs
Key players
Key technologies
Strategies of major players in demand response
Improving load control through demand response programs
Use of third-party aggregators to improve demand response implementation
Challenges in demand response
Low level of demand response implementation in competitive markets due to possible revenue loss
Regulatory hurdles
Non-availability of real-time data
Lack of AMI
Demand response potential

CHAPTER 4 SMART GRID

Summary
Overview of smart grid and smart metering
Top states investing in smart grid
Major players in smart grid
Smart meter vendors
Communication network players
Meter data management (MDM) vendors
Drivers of the smart grid
Government stimulus
Growth of renewables
Resistors against the smart grid
High installation costs
Multiple standards
Grid security

CHAPTER 5 ENERGY STORAGE

Summary
Overview of energy storage
Major technologies
Pumped storage
Compressed air energy storage
Batteries
Molten salt storage technology
Flywheel energy storage
Drivers of energy storage
Anticipated increase in renewable power
Government support
Resistors against energy storage
High installation cost

CHAPTER 6 FUTURE OUTLOOK

Summary
US electricity market outlook
Transmission and distribution outlook
Glossary/abbreviations

TABLE OF FIGURES

Figure 1: US installed power generation capacity by state, 2008 (%), 2010
Figure 2: US electricity generation by state, 2009 (%), 2010
Figure 3: NERC interconnections map, 2009
Figure 4: Transmission lines in the US as of 2008 above 100kV (circuit miles), 2009
Figure 5: Transmission lines in the US by state as of 2008 above 132kV (circuit miles), 2010
Figure 6: Category of electric utilities in the US, 2008
Figure 7: Renewable installed power generation capacity in the US, 2005–09 (MW), 2010
Figure 8: Renewable power generation in the US, 2004–08 (GWh), 2010
Figure 9: Wind resource map of the US, 2009
Figure 10: Wind power potential in the US, 2010
Figure 11: Solar resource map of the US, 2008
Figure 12: Top 15 states by solar power potential in the US, 2010
Figure 13: Geothermal power resources in the US, 2009
Figure 14: Biomass resources of the US, 2009
Figure 15: The Green Power Express transmission map, 2009
Figure 16: Noncoincident actual peak load 2005–09 (MW), 2010
Figure 17: Entities offering price demand response programs
Figure 18: Top 10 peak demand reductions by state in the US, 2009 (MW), 2010
Figure 19: Utility-scale smart meter deployments, plans and proposals, 2010
Figure 20: Top 10 states receiving SGIG funds ($m), 2009
Figure 21: Key smart grid players, 2010
Figure 22: Pumped storage installed capacity by state in US, 2008 (MW), 2010
Figure 23: Working principle of a pumped storage system, 2010
Figure 24: Working principle of a CAES system, 2010
Figure 25: Working principle of batteries, 2010
Figure 26: Working principle of molten salt storage system, 2010
Figure 27: Working principle of a flywheel, 2010
Figure 28: Cost comparison of select energy storage technologies ($ per kW), 2010
Figure 29: Installed power generation capacity forecast, 2007–35 (GW), 2010
Figure 30: Transmission lines in the US above 100kV, 2008–18 (circuit miles), 2009

TABLE OF TABLES

Table 1: US installed power generation capacity by state, 1990–2008 (GW), 2010
Table 2: US electricity generation by state, 1990–2009 (TWh), 2010
Table 3: Transmission lines in the US as of 2008 above 100kV (circuit miles), 2009
Table 4: Transmission lines in the US by state as of 2008 above 132kV (circuit miles), 2010
Table 5: Category of electric utilities in the US, 2008
Table 6: Major investor-owned electric utilities in the US, 2010
Table 7: Renewable installed power generation capacity in the US, 2005–09 (MW), 2010
Table 8: Renewable power generation in the US, 2004–08 (GWh), 2010
Table 9: Wind power potential in the US, 2010
Table 10: Top 15 states by solar power potential in the US, 2010
Table 11: RPS for select states in the US, 2010
Table 12: Select renewables-related transmission projects Part 1, 2010
Table 13: Select renewables-related transmission projects Part 2, 2010
Table 14: Noncoincident actual peak load 2005–09 (MW), 2010
Table 15: Entities offering price demand response programs, 2009
Table 16: Potential and actual peak load reduction by demand response resources, by region, 2007 (MW), 2009
Table 17: Top 10 peak demand reductions by state in the US, 2009 (MW), 2010
Table 18: Select utilities' demand response programs, 2010
Table 19: Select contracts of utilities with third-party demand response service providers, 2010
Table 20: Peak load reduction estimate, 2009–19 (GW), 2009
Table 21: Select utilities’ planned smart meter deployment, 2010
Table 22: Top 10 states receiving SGIG funds ($m), 2009
Table 23: Major utilities receiving SGIG funding Part 1, 2009
Table 24: Major utilities receiving SGIG funding Part 2, 2009
Table 25: Break-up of ARRA provisions for smart grid, 2009
Table 26: Categorical split of SGIG program fund allocation, 2009
Table 27: Cyber security projects announced by the US DoE, 2010
Table 28: Pumped storage installed capacity by state in US, 2004–08 (MW), 2010
Table 29: Stimulus grants by state, 2009
Table 30: Cost comparison of select energy storage technologies ($ per kW), 2010
Table 31: Installed power generation capacity forecast, 2007–35 (GW), 2010
Table 32: Transmission addition plans in the US above 100kV (circuit miles), 2009
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