Strategic Issues in Global Energy Security: Global Energy Strategy to 2050

Date: March 22, 2010
Pages: 188
Price:
US$ 2,875.00
Publisher: Business Insights
Report type: Strategic Report
Delivery: E-mail Delivery (PDF)
ID: S582904BF4BEN
Leaflet:

Download PDF Leaflet

Strategic Issues in Global Energy Security: Global Energy Strategy to 2050
Energy supply worldwide has hitherto centred around affordability and security of supply, with the aspiration to provide light, heat, cooling, communications and transportation for as many people as possible.

To these factors a third imperative has arrived in the form of the low carbon agenda. This is in response to evidence of climate change caused by greenhouse gas emissions, and now has international sanction in the form of UN protocols, regional legislation and national carbon targets.

This three way policy structure has been dubbed the ‘Trilemma’, a phrase first coined by international energy company Eon, and reconciling affordability, security and the carbon agenda is a message which informs this report.

While economies worldwide have to find mechanisms and technologies which meet these three not always complementary aims, energy policy must also be played out through the prism of growing populations which will to an extent cancel out gains made by more efficient energy production.

Key features of this report
  • Identifying the Trilemma and key pillars of energy policy
  • Examining the key technologies deployed in present and future energy generation up to 2050
  • Regional energy issues in key markets worldwide, both mature and emerging
  • Statistical breakdown of the global energy mix
  • Identification of threats to energy security and chokepoints which could threaten energy security
Scope of this report
  • Achieve a quick and comprehensive understanding of global electricity market trends
  • Realize up to date competitive intelligence through an examination of key energy markets
  • Assess how energy markets may develop and how different geographic and economic issues will change the way they develop in different places
Key Market Issues
  • Affordability : Countries worldwide need to provide energy to their citizens at a price they can afford . Providing 100 % access to electricity is no use if the technologies which deliver it are too expensive.
  • Threats to security : While weather conditions, mechanical breakdown, economic conditions and commodity price volatility can all affect security of supply, so can geopolitical issues, ‘resource nationalism’ and asymetrical threats such as terrorism and piracy.
  • Competing technologies: In terms of generating technologies traditional high carbon fossil fuels currently dominate, but the need to ‘decarbonise’ energy supply in the face of global warming will lead to a mix of energy sources including nuclear and renewables
Key findings from this report
  • Energy markets of the future will have to address low carbon as well as affordability and security issues
  • A diverse energy mix will probably be the most secure way to assure energy policy objectives are met
  • Governments will find that as they progress in terms of extending access to energy they will battle against growing populations
  • While renewables and low carbon energy is seen by many as the future, fossil fuels are going to continue to dominate in the medium term
  • Shale gas could well be a ‘wild card’ in terms of its impact on world energy markets, as has already been seen in the US
Key questions answered
  • How can the low carbon agenda be reconciled with affordability and security ?
  • What are the energy generation technologies available now and on to 2050 ?
  • Ways in which different mature and emerging energy economies differ ?
  • How energy supply will meet a 50 % rise in global population by 2050 ?
  • Which scenarios are likely to evolve to meet the world’s low carbon energy requirements by 2050
Strategic Issues in Global Energy Security
Executive Summary
Introduction
The fundamentals of energy policy
Generation types
Energy efficient technologies
Energy transmission, distribution and storage
The United States
The emerging economies
Asia
Africa
Europe
Regional security issues
International energy chokepoints
Conclusion

CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION

Summary
Introduction
The global Energy Trilemma
The post-Copenhagen Summit landscape
The role of international organizations
The role of markets

CHAPTER 2 THE FUNDAMENTALS OF GLOBAL ENERGY SECURITY POLICY

Summary
Introduction
How we got here
The customer
The low carbon environment
The investor
Reconciliation
Supporting the fundamentals

CHAPTER 3 GENERATION TYPES

Summary
Introduction
Conventional fossil fuel generation
Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS)
Beyond fossil fuels - the low carbon alternatives to 2050
Nuclear energy/Fission
Nuclear energy/Fusion
Renewable energy
Wind
Onshore wind
Offshore wind
Solar power
Biomass
Biofuels
Combined Heat and Power
Hydro
Marine energy – wave
Marine energy – tidal
Heat pumps
Fuel cells and hydrogen

CHAPTER 4 ENERGY EFFICIENT TECHNOLOGIES

Summary
Introduction
A new industrial revolution
Smart metering
Heat pumps
Electric vehicles
Feed-in tariffs (FITS)
FITs in Germany
The case for ROCs
The view from Stern
FITs – the US view
FITs in China
FITs in India
FITs in South Africa
Conclusion
The EU ETS

CHAPTER 5 ENERGY TRANSMISSION AND STORAGE

Summary
Introduction
North America
Europe
Recent failure of the European T & D system
The scale of the challenge for Europe

CHAPTER 6 THE UNITED STATES

Summary
Introduction
Relying on overseas energy supplies
Gas and coal in the US
Shale gas – to the medium term rescue?
The US and nuclear power
The US and wind power

CHAPTER 7 THE EMERGING ECONOMIES

Summary
Introduction
China
Population growth
The energy mix
Coal in China
Oil in China
Gas in China
Renewables in China
Nuclear in China
India
Population growth
Fossil fuel generation
Other energy sources
Drivers of energy policy
Nuclear power in India
Solar power in India
Brazil
Population
The energy mix
Brazil and oil
Brazil‘s energy mix
Brazil and nuclear power
Ethanol

CHAPTER 8 ASIA

Summary
Introduction
Indonesia
Population
Economic growth
Energy investment
South Korea
Japan

CHAPTER 9 AFRICA

Summary
Introduction
Investment criteria
Seven key challenges
A local solution
The EIB view
Away from a centralised solution
South Africa

CHAPTER 10 EUROPE

Summary
Introduction
Overview
Gas reserves – United Kingdom
North Sea gas strategies – and the Arctic region
The view from Eurelectric
A carbon neutral power sector for 2050
Could energy demand actually fall?
Eurelectric’s key policy recommendations
The European Commission and energy policy
Europe and gas
Reaction to past gas supply crises
The European Economic Recovery Plan
Europe’s Nuclear Renaissance
Conclusion
European Energy Directives

CHAPTER 11 REGIONAL SECURITY ISSUES

Summary
Introduction
Threats to energy supply – the expert’s views
AKE Group
Lloyd’s Register
UK Defence Academy
Liam Fox MP
Russia and the Former Soviet Union
Ukraine
Georgia
The ‘Stans’ and Caspian Basin
Iraq
Iran
Saudi Arabia
Nigeria
Equatorial Guinea
Argentina and the Falklands
Venezuela

CHAPTER 12 ENERGY CHOKEPOINTS WORLDWIDE

Summary
Introduction
The Strait of Hormuz
The Strait of Malacca
The Suez Canal and Sumed pipeline
Bab el-Mandab
The Turkish Straits
The Panama Canal

CHAPTER 13 CONCLUSION

Summary
Introduction
An oil major’s view - Exxon Mobil
Role of renewables
The view from the IEA
Climate change
Two IEA scenarios
Investment
Conclusion
Shell’s scenarios for 2050 – scramble or a blueprint?
Scramble
Blueprints
Incentivising innovation
Reducing risk by keeping energy closer to home
Appendix
Glossary
Index

LIST OF FIGURES

Figure 2.1: World population, and projection for 2050
Figure 5.2: European distribution network – Baltic Interconnectors, 2009
Figure 5.3: European distribution network - North Sea smart grid, 2009
Figure 7.4: Brazil, energy mix (GWh), 2007
Figure 10.5: German energy costs (Euros per tonne of CO2), 2010
Figure 13.6: World energy investment needs to 2030, 2009

LIST OF TABLES

Table 2.1: World population, and projection for 2050
Table 3.2: World nuclear electricity generation, 2009
Table 3.3: World nuclear future, 2009
Table 3.4: Installed wind power in Europe (MW), 2008
Table 3.5: Global solar power by region (GWh), 2007
Table 3.6: Most important CHP markets (MW), 2008
Table 4.7: Countries which have adopted FITS, 2009
Table 7.8: Brazil, energy mix (GWh), 2007
Table 10.9: German energy costs (Euros per tonne of CO2), 2010
Table 10.10: European Energy Directives
Table 13.11: World energy investment needs to 2030, 2009
Skip to top


GE Energy - Strategy and SWOT Report US$ 175.00 Feb, 2016 · 33 pages

Ask Your Question

Strategic Issues in Global Energy Security: Global Energy Strategy to 2050
Company name*:
Contact person*:
Phone/fax*:
Email*:
Request invoice
Your enquiry:
Please click on a Check Box below to confirm you are not a robot: