The Smart Power System: Smart Grids, smart meters, home controllers, home automation and energy efficiency

Date: November 22, 2010
Pages: 168
Price:
US$ 2,875.00
Publisher: Business Insights
Report type: Strategic Report
Delivery: E-mail Delivery (PDF)
ID: S36B89B358AEN
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The Smart Power System: Smart Grids, smart meters, home controllers, home automation and energy efficiency
The smart grid, also known as the intelligent grid, has been a theoretical approach to the management of electricity supply and production for many years. It has long been seen as having a major role to play in combating the effects of global warming. The application of smart grid technology solves simultaneously a number of issues that affect the current aging grid infrastructure: It turns power (and other utility) grids upside down, changing them from hierarchical centralised entities into distributed grids with multiple points of redundancy as well as layered back-up facilities; It permits efficiencies by applying far greater automation and control not only to the supply of power, but to its consumption as well; It encourages and allows the incorporation of renewables into national and even international grids, by managing input from local power generation relative to needs and distributed power supply.

These features make the intelligent grid an essential component in global solutions to climate change, as well as providing nations with the means to turn such solutions into reality. Until recently, however, discussion of such concepts has, largely, been relegated to the theoretical: in 2009/10, the tide appears to have turned. Across the globe, multi-billion dollar investments are now being poured into the development and roll-out of intelligent grid systems, with forecasts for major and significant investment to come. In part, this is because the technology is now reaching a point where such development is possible: in part, because a variety of drivers, from economic to political are making such development imperative. This report therefore plots the story of the recent development of intelligent grid systems, examining the technologies now being brought online, the rationale for development, international investments in intelligent grids, as well as the way that these technologies are being specifically implemented at every level within the distribution system.

This report plots the story of the recent development of intelligent grid systems, examining the technologies now being brought online, the rationale for development, international investments in intelligent grids, as well as the way that these technologies are being specifically implemented at every level within the distribution system. rben0250

Scope of this research
  • Understand why smart grids are becoming reality now.
  • Focus on where the major international spending is being carried out.
  • Highlight the different sectors in which new smart grid technologies are being applied: identify new niche markets and opportunities within them.
  • Specific commercial opportunities – and threats to new entrants: who are key players now, what are they doing, and what may restrict some companies.
  • Build on current best practice: the natural affiliation between smart grid approaches and current marketing practices.
Research and analysis highlights

2010 is the year in which smart grid technology moved off the drawing board and out of the academic journals, and into large-scale commercial development.

Worldwide investment is led by two giants: the United States and CHina, each applying very different business and political models to the development of smart grid. There is a very real question as to whether a central command-and-control approach or a more free market approach will prove more suitable for such an enormous task.

There are major investments going on now, although many of these investments appear to be less than optimal both in terms of objectives set and project control: supporters of smart grid technology should be prepared for major public relations setbacks

Key reasons to purchase this research
  • What are the key issues driving the development of smart grids?
  • What are the (current) major gaps in technology likely to act as brakes on this development?
  • Who are the key players in smart grid development, both at national and corporate level?
  • What are the key segments that make up the smart grid environment – and how do these match up to business opportunities?
  • What new business relationships are likely to be needed in order to optimise smart grid development?
John Ozimek
Professor Merlin Stone
Executive summary
Introduction
Enablers
Drivers
Structural considerations in building the intelligent grid
National initiatives building the intelligent grid
Market structure: key segments and players developing the Smart Grid
Smart appliances, smart homes, smart cities
Implementation case studies
Summary, conclusion and the future outlook

CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION

Introduction
Rationale
Grid evolution
Implementation

CHAPTER 2 ENABLERS

Summary
Introduction
Types of grid
Hierarchic - the current model
Distributed grids - the future wave
Key components of the intelligent grid
Advanced metering
Phasor measurement units
Visualization technology and agents
Key technologies underpinning the intelligent grid
Integrated communications
Sensing and measurement technologies
Decision support and interfaces
Advanced control methods
Advanced technologies and components

CHAPTER 3 DRIVERS

Summary
Introduction
Political drivers
Global warming
International demand for GHG reductions
Routes to GHG emissions reduction
Smart Grids impact at several levels
Energy conservation
Grid efficiency
Renewable integration
Transport electrification
Electric vehicles integrated with renewables
Overall savings
Energy security
Leakage
Security
Macro-economic
Aging infrastructure
Commercial
Market liberalization
Customer management
Cost – a double-edged sword
Consumer concerns
Security issues

CHAPTER 4 STRUCTURAL CONSIDERATIONS IN BUILDING THE INTELLIGENT GRID

Summary
Introduction
The intelligent distribution system
Micro grids
DC micro grid
Power parks
Virtual power plants
The home area network
Renewable technologies
Wind power
Solar photovoltaic power generation
Solar thermal power generation
Small hydropower
Biomass
Marine technologies
Micro turbines and gas engines
Fuel cells
Integration of renewables
Grid extension
Unpredictability
Intermittency
Energy storage
Plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV)
International progress
Intelligent distribution in practice
Case study: Orkney wind power
Legal and regulatory issues associated with the intelligent grid

CHAPTER 5 NATIONAL INITIATIVES BUILDING THE INTELLIGENT GRID

Introduction
World league table
World map
International co-operation
China
Forward planning and investment
Focus on transmission
US
Investment
Additional factors
Initiatives
Asia Pacific
Japan
South Korea
Australia
Business opportunities
Business threats
Europe
UK
Spain
Germany
France
Italy
Rest of the world
Brazil

CHAPTER 6 MARKET STRUCTURE: KEY SEGMENTS AND PLAYERS DEVELOPING THE

smart grid
Summary
Introduction
Market place
Utilities
Substation automation
Distribution
Phasor Measurement Unit
Sensors
Power system automation
Communication
Demand Response
Networks and transports
Consumers
Cross-over roles
Smart Grid integrators
Back-end systems
Security
Supporting organizations

CHAPTER 7 SMART APPLIANCES, SMART HOMES, AND SMART CITIES

Summary
Introduction
Smart appliances
Definition of the smart home appliance
Global growth in smart appliances
Smart metering trend: US Data
Smart buildings, smart houses
Advanced metering infrastructure
HomeBox
Sensors
Metering/analysis software
Remote control and automation
Communication
Standards
Smart homes
Smart cities
Initiatives
Asia
South Korea
Songdo
Hwaseong Dongtan
China
Shenyang
Other key cities
North America
US
Boulder
Indiana
San Jose
Europe
Portugal
Spain
The Netherlands
Amsterdam
Middle East
Abu Dhabi
Australia
New South Wales
Newcastle
Cautionary note

CHAPTER 8 IMPLEMENTATION CASE STUDIES

Summary
Introduction
Projects
Grupo CEMIG
Nuon Energy
E.ON smart metering roll-out
Key success factors
Simple CRM on the road to the smart grid
Achieve customer buy-in
Legacy systems
Piloting/risk management
Governance
Teamwork
“Best of breed”/standards

CHAPTER 9 SUMMARY, CONCLUSION THE FUTURE OUTLOOK

Summary
Looking forward to 2015
Lack of clear objectives
Lack of standards
Technological advance and economies of scale
Consumer acceptance
Spectacular failure
Obvious success
Appendix
References
Glossary

TABLE OF FIGURES

Figure 1: Differences between hierarchic and distributed (smart) grid
Figure 2: Impacts of four Kaya factors on world CO2 emissions
Figure 3: Generation technology installed costs (US$/kW)
Figure 4: Renewable energy country attractiveness indices (overall)
Figure 5: Top ten smart grid federal stimulus investments by country, 2010 (in US$m)
Figure 6: Sample map taken from the Google smart metering projects map: Western Europe74
Figure 7: Proposed investment in energy infrastructure (US$m)
Figure 8: Main categories for proposed investment in energy efficiency and renewable energy research and investment (US$m)
Figure 9: Per capita spend by country in Asia Pacific on smart grid investment (US$), 2010
Figure 10: NIST Smart Grid Conceptual Model, September 2009
Figure 11: Conceptual overview of the smart grid marketplace
Figure 12: Breakdown of smart-related spend in the US (US$m), 2010
Figure 13: US smart vendor marketplace by company category (Number of companies), 2010103
Figure 14: Smart market/vendor relationships for Itron
Figure 15: Smart market/vendor relationships for Cisco
Figure 16: Projected global smart appliance market value 2011-2015 (US$m)
Figure 17: Projected main global smart appliances, market value 2015 (US$m)
Figure 18: Projected US smart appliance market value 2010-2015 (US$m)
Figure 19: Projected US smart appliance market value by segment 2010 vs 2015 (%)
Figure 20: Changes in new smart meter shipments 2010 vs. 2015 (m)
Figure 21: Changes in smart meter installed base 2010 vs. 2015 (m)
Figure 22: Example of the integration required in a typical smart residence, 2010

TABLE OF TABLES

Table 1: Key intelligent grid components
Table 2: Key intelligent grid enabling technologies
Table 3: Intelligent grid distribution system concepts
Table 4: Generation technology installed costs (US$/kW)
Table 5: Categorization of hydropower plants by output
Table 6: Energy storage technologies
Table 7: Renewable energy country attractiveness indices
Table 8: Top ten smart grid federal stimulus investments by country, 2010 (in US$m)
Table 9: Proposed investment in energy infrastructure (US$m)
Table 10: Main categories for proposed investment in energy efficiency and renewable energy research and investment (US$m)
Table 11: Per capita spend by country in Asia Pacific on smart grid investment (US$), 2010
Table 12: Breakdown of smart-related spend in the US (US$m), 2010
Table 13: US smart vendor marketplace by company category (Number of companies), 2010103
Table 14: Key intelligent grid components top ten smart grid federal stimulus investments by country, 2010 (in US$m)
Table 15: Projected global smart appliance market value 2011-2015 (US$m)
Table 16: Projected main global smart appliances, market value 2015 (US$m)
Table 17: Projected US smart appliance market value 2010-2015 (US$m)
Table 18: Projected US smart appliance market value by segment 2010 vs 2015 (US$m)
Table 19: US smart meters: new shipments and installed base (m), 2010-2015 126
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