Green Energy in Emerging Economies: Renewable investment, capacity growth, and future outlook

Date: February 22, 2010
Pages: 172
Price:
US$ 2,875.00
Publisher: Business Insights
Report type: Strategic Report
Delivery: E-mail Delivery (PDF), Hard Copy Mail Delivery, CD-ROM Mail Delivery
ID: G664E7ADCE1EN
Leaflet:

Download PDF Leaflet

Green Energy in Emerging Economies: Renewable investment, capacity growth, and future outlook
Rapid growth in economy and energy consumption in non-OECD countries will need an expansion in the power generation market. Governments will increasingly be looking to develop renewable energies to avoid power shortages that would stunt development and therefore mitigate government objectives of raising living standards.

Global economic and energy demand growth will be concentrated in developing economies, so there is much potential for the role of renewable energies in emerging markets to expand over the next two decades. Although conventional forms of energy will still dominate the energy mix, the expansion of power-generating capacity in emerging markets will at least partly be supplied by growth in wind, solar, bio and hydropower.

The BRIC – Brazil, Russia, India and China - countries and other emerging markets are facing the twin challenges of promoting economic growth while mitigating the environmental impact of their growth strategies.

While there is criticism that countries such as India and China have balked from making more firm commitments to cutting their GHG emissions, both these countries nevertheless have prioritized renewable energy development as part of their strategy to reduce the carbon intensity of their respective economies per unit of GDP.

Therefore, developing economies led by the BRIC countries are playing an increasingly crucial role, not just in the global economic order, but also in the climate change debate and in the dynamics of global energy supply and demand.

Key findings

China will be one of the major markets for wind power over the next two decades. China’s National Energy Administration stated that the country aims to more than double its wind power capacity to 30GW by 2020. China will reportedly invest at least $150bn to achieve the 30GW target by 2010.

By 2030, non-OECD economies will account for 59% of global energy consumption, a marked increase from 49.8% in 2006. Also by 2030, non-OECD economies will be emitting 25.8bn mt of carbon dioxide, or 64% of total emissions.

Brazil has huge potential for renewable energy through the burning of bagasse – a waste product from sugarcane production - to generate onsite heat and power. In 2009, it is estimated that 8,892MW of power will be produced by sugar cane with 3,600MW available to the market.

Incentive schemes will be crucial for the development of renewable energy sector over the next two decades. The report includes a detailed look at the many policies being promoted by the emerging economies, with a special emphasis on India.

Renewable energy policies differ greatly among the smaller emerging economies, ranging from the promotion of solar power in the Czech Republic to the concentration on geothermal power by the government of Indonesia.

Use this report to...

  • Achieve a quick and comprehensive understanding of the renewable energy sector in the major emerging economies.
  • Realize up-to-date competitive intelligence through an extensive review of the different forms of renewable energy and the different rates of development depending on the country.
  • Assess the policy goals of the emerging economies regarding renewable energy and how these are driving capacity expansion.
  • Identify which forms of renewable energy and which markets have the greatest growth potential for renewable energy.
  • Identify the main drivers and resistors to growth for all the main renewable energy sources in each of the major emerging economies.


  • Explore issues including...

    Environmental requirements: - By 2006, non-OECD economies had exceeded the OECD in energy related carbon dioxide emissions. Meanwhile, BRIC countries, especially China and India, will play a major role in emissions growth over the next two decades by virtue of the fact that in each case economic growth and energy demand expansion will be robust. On the back of this, emerging economies are coming under increasing international pressure to cut emissions and invest in renewable sources.

    Legislative issues: - As China has become a leading emitter of GHGs, its government has also decided to facilitate the growth of cleaner renewable energy sources to help fuel the country’s economic expansion. This has resulted in the country pledging to install almost 350GW of renewable capacity by 2030. Faced by similar problems, many of the leading emerging economies are also adopting comprehensive national policies to promote renewable energy.

    Government support for renewable energy: - The cost of renewable energy remains above that for fossil-fuelled generation technologies. Therefore the sector has required substantial government support in the emerging economies in order to stimulate development. This includes the implementation of generous fixed tariffs for electricity generated and other support schemes such as tax incentives.

    Future growth: - Rapid economic and energy consumption growth in non-OECD countries will need to be fed by expanded power generation. Meanwhile, a shift in an overall policy towards environmental issues is occurring at the same time. Together these two issues will combine to drive substantial renewable energy investment in the developing world up to 2030.

    Discover...

  • What are the drivers shaping and influencing the renewable energy sector in the emerging economies?
  • Which countries have the greatest potential for renewable energy?
  • What types of renewable energy have the greatest potential for growth in the emerging economies?
  • How is economic growth and increasing power consumption shaping renewable energy policies at a national level?
  • How are governments reacting to international pressure to reduce carbon dioxide emissions and what has been the impact of events such as the Copenhagen Conference?
  • Who are the main companies benefiting from the surge in investment in renewable energy in the emerging world?

  • Green Energy in Emerging Economies
    Executive summary 12
    Market outlook 12
    China 13
    India 14
    Brazil 15
    Russia 16
    Other countries 17
    Future outlook 18

    CHAPTER 1 MARKET OUTLOOK

    Overview of the electricity sector 22
    Overview of renewable energy 26
    Wind power 29
    Solar power 30
    Biopower 31
    Hydropower 32
    Geothermal 33

    CHAPTER 2 CHINA

    Summary 36
    Introduction 37
    China’s current energy picture 37
    China’s energy policy framework 39
    Wind power 42
    Key players 44
    Case study – China High Speed Transmission (CHST) 45
    Drivers of wind power 46
    Resistors of wind power 47
    Solar power 47
    Key players 49
    Drivers of solar power 50
    Resistors of solar power 51
    Biopower 51
    Key players 53
    Drivers of biopower 54
    Resistors of biopower 54
    Hydropower 54
    Small hydropower 55
    Large hydropower 55
    Key players 56
    Drivers of hydropower 56
    Resistors of hydropower 57
    Geothermal 57
    Conclusions 57

    CHAPTER 3 INDIA

    Overview 61
    India’s energy demand growth and the climate change challenge 61
    India’s energy policies 63
    India’s energy supply mix 64
    Wind power 66
    Key players 68
    Case study – new incentives 69
    Drivers of wind power 70
    Resistors of wind power 71
    Solar power 71
    Key players 74
    Drivers of solar power 75
    Resistors of solar power 75
    Biopower 76
    Key players 77
    Drivers to biopower 78
    Resistors to biopower 78
    Geothermal 78
    Hydropower 79
    Small hydropower 81
    Key players 81
    Drivers of small hydropower 81
    Resistors of small hydropower 82
    Large hydropower 82
    Key players 84
    Drivers of hydropower 85
    Resistors of hydropower 85
    Conclusions 86

    CHAPTER 4 BRAZIL

    Overview 89
    Wind power 93
    Key players 96
    Drivers of wind power 97
    Resistors of wind power 97
    Solar power 97
    Drivers of solar power 98
    Resistors of solar power 99
    Biopower 99
    Case study – sugar cane bagasse 100
    Key players 101
    Drivers of biopower 102
    Resistors of biopower 102
    Hydropower 103
    Small hydropower 103
    Key players 104
    Drivers of hydropower 104
    Resistors of hydropower 105
    Geothermal 105
    Conclusions 105

    CHAPTER 5 RUSSIA

    Overview 108
    Russia, climate change and energy policy 110
    Russia’s energy mix and potential for renewables 111
    Wind power 113
    Key players 114
    Drivers of wind power 115
    Resistors of wind power 115
    Solar power 116
    Case study – solar industry growth in 2009 116
    Drivers of solar power 118
    Resistors of solar power 118
    Biopower 118
    Drivers of biopower 119
    Resistors of biopower 119
    Hydropower 119
    Key players 121
    Drivers of hydropower 122
    Resistors of hydropower 122
    Geothermal 122
    Conclusions 123

    CHAPTER 6 OTHER COUNTRIES

    Turkey 127
    Introduction 127
    Wind power 131
    Solar power 132
    Biopower 132
    Hydropower 132
    Geothermal 133
    Indonesia 133
    Wind power 136
    Solar power 136
    Biopower 137
    Hydropower 137
    Geothermal 138
    Poland 139
    Wind power 140
    Solar power 141
    Biopower 141
    Hydropower 142
    Geothermal 142
    Czech Republic 142
    Wind power 144
    Solar power 144
    Case study – Czech solar industry growth 144
    Biopower 146
    Hydropower 146
    Geothermal power 147
    Hungary 147
    Wind power 148
    Solar power 149
    Biopower 149
    Hydropower 149
    Geothermal 150
    South Africa 150

    CHAPTER 7 FUTURE OUTLOOK

    Outlook for energy consumption and power generation 155
    CO2 emissions 159
    Wind power 160
    Solar power 162
    Biopower 163
    Hydropower 164
    Geothermal 166
    Conclusions 166
    Glossary 168
    Index 171

    LIST OF FIGURES

    Figure 1.1: Global growth in net electricity generation (bn kWh), 2000–2008 24
    Figure 1.2: Total renewable power installed capacity (m kW), 2000 – 2007 28
    Figure 2.3: China, electricity production market share (%), 2006 38
    Figure 2.4: Wind power installation capacity (MW), 2008 42
    Figure 2.5: Leading country producers of PV cells (GW), 2008 49
    Figure 2.6: Biomass generation capacity (MW), 2005–2008 52
    Figure 2.7: Installed capacity of biomass power technologies (MW), 2008 53
    Figure 3.8: Estimated growth in Indian renewable energy capacity of power generation (MW), 2009-2012 65
    Figure 3.9: India, wind power capacity by state (MW), 2008 68
    Figure 3.10: Indian solar resources 72
    Figure 3.11: India solar power projections (2012–2030), GW 74
    Figure 3.12: India's potential hydropower potential by region (MW), 2007 80
    Figure 3.13: India hydropower capacity additions (MW), 2009-2012 84
    Figure 4.14: Brazil, net electricity consumption growth (bn kWh), 2000–2007 90
    Figure 4.15: Brazil, net electricity generation (bn kWh), 2008 93
    Figure 4.16: Brazil wind power capacity (MW), 2002–2008 94
    Figure 5.17: Russia, primary energy consumption (Mtoe), 2008 109
    Figure 5.18: Total power generation capacity in Russia (MW), 2007 112
    Figure 5.19: Russia, wind power capacity projected expansion (MW), 2010–2020 114
    Figure 6.20: Turkey, net electricity generation (bn kWh), 2008 128
    Figure 6.21: Wind energy feed-in prices (€ per MWh), 2008 130
    Figure 6.22: Indonesia, installed power generation capacity (GW), 2008 134
    Figure 6.23: Indonesia, net electricity generation (bn kWh), 2008 135
    Figure 6.24: Poland, electricity production from wind power (GWh), 2004 –2008 141
    Figure 6.25: Czech Republic, installed capacity (GWh), 2008 143
    Figure 6.26: Czech Republic, installed solar capacity (MW), Jan 2008 – Nov 2009 146
    Figure 6.27: Hungary, installed capacity (MW), 2008 148
    Figure 7.28: Total primary energy consumption BRIC region (QBtu), 1990 – 2030 159
    Figure 7.29: Wind power capacity projections, China and India (MW), 2010–2030 161

    LIST OF TABLES

    Table 1.1: Global growth in net electricity generation (bn kWh), 2000–2008 23
    Table 1.2: Total renewable power installed capacity (m kW), 2000 – 2007 28
    Table 1.3: Wind power capacity, top five countries (MW), 2008 29
    Table 1.4: Global solar power capacity (GW), 2008 30
    Table 2.5: China, electricity production market share (%), 2006 38
    Table 2.6: Wind power installation capacity (MW), 2008 42
    Table 2.7: Leading country producers of PV cells (GW), 2008 48
    Table 2.8: Biomass generation capacity (MW), 2005-2008 52
    Table 2.9: Installed capacity of biomass power technologies (MW), 2008 53
    Table 3.10: Estimated growth in Indian renewable energy capacity (MW), 2009-2012 65
    Table 3.11: India, wind power capacity by state, 2008 67
    Table 3.12: India solar power projections (GW), 2012-2030 73
    Table 3.13: Power generation capacity of biopower in India (MW), October 2009 76
    Table 3.14: India's hydropower potential by region (MW), 2007 80
    Table 3.15: India hydropower capacity additions (MW), 2009-2012 83
    Table 4.16: Brazil, net electricity consumption (bn kWh), 2000-2007 89
    Table 4.17: Projections of installed capacity for renewable energy sources in Brazil (MW), 2015– 2030 92
    Table 4.18: Brazil, net electricity generation (bn kWh), 2008 93
    Table 4.19: Brazil, wind power capacity (MW), 2002-2008 94
    Table 4.20: Brazil biopower capacity (MW), 2009–2019 101
    Table 5.21: Russia, primary energy consumption (Mtoe), 2008 109
    Table 5.22: Total power generation capacity in Russia (MW), 2007 111
    Table 5.23: Russia, wind power capacity projected expansion (MW), 2010-2020 113
    Table 6.24: Turkey, net electricity generation (bn kWh), 2008 127
    Table 6.25: Wind energy feed-in prices (€ per MWh), 2008 130
    Table 6.26: Indonesia, installed power generation capacity (GW), 2008 134
    Table 6.27: Indonesia, net electricity generation (bn kWh), 2008 135
    Table 6.28: Poland, electricity production from wind power (GWh), 2004-2008 140
    Table 6.29: Czech Republic, installed capacity (GW), 2007 143
    Table 6.30: Czech Republic, installed solar capacity (MW), Jan 2008– Nov 2009 145
    Table 6.31: Hungary, installed capacity (GW), 2008 147
    Table 6.32: South Africa: renewable energy feed-in tariffs (ZAR/kWh), March 2009 151
    Table 7.33: World energy consumption (QBtu), 156
    Table 7.34: Global projections of net electricity generation by energy source (trn kWh), 2010– 2030 157
    Table 7.35: Total primary energy consumption BRIC region (QBtu), 1990 -2030 158
    Table 7.36: Global energy related CO2 emissions forecasts (bn metric tonnes) 160
    Table 7.37: Wind power capacity projections, China and India (MW), 2010-2030 161
    Table 7.38: Global projections of renewable electricity generation by source (bn kWh), 2010–2030 165

    Skip to top


    Ask Your Question

    Green Energy in Emerging Economies: Renewable investment, capacity growth, and future outlook
    Company name*:
    Contact person*:
    Phone/fax*:
    Email*:
    Request invoice
    Your enquiry:
    Please click on a Check Box below to confirm you are not a robot: