The Future of Concentrating Solar Power Technologies

Date: February 22, 2011
Pages: 125
Price:
US$ 2,875.00
Publisher: Business Insights
Report type: Strategic Report
Delivery: E-mail Delivery (PDF)
ID: F786E4A5D40EN
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The Future of Concentrating Solar Power Technologies
Although the global capacity remains small, the potential is enormous and solar power is expected to contribute significantly to electricity production by the middle of the century.

Solar thermal power generation depends on both a high solar intensity and a large amount of direct incident radiation not scattered by clouds. The best sites are generally in arid, desert regions with high annual sunshine levels. Most of these sites are found between 15º and 40º of latitude either side of the equator.

Scope of this research
  • Realize up-to-date competitive intelligence through a comprehensive review of concentrating solar power technologies concepts in power generation.
  • Assess the emerging trends in csp technologies – parabolic troughs, solar towers, parabolic dishs, Fresnel reflectors and energy storage.
  • Identify which key trends will offer the greatest growth potential and learn which technology trends are likely to have greater market impact.
  • Compare how manufacturers are developing new concentrating solar power technologies.
  • Quantify costs of csp technologies, with comparisons against other forms of power generation technology, installation costs, cost of electricity.
Research and analysis highlights

While the recent growth in output is promising, solar thermal power plants still provide only a tiny fraction of global power consumption. Total global electricity production in 2008 was 20,169,000GWh. Of this renewable production (mostly from hydropower) accounted for 18.7% and the solar thermal contribution was 0.005%.

The average energy density reaching the earth's surface is about 170W/m3 and the greatest, in the region of the Red Sea, is close to 300W/m3.

Across the region encompassing Africa, southern Europe and Asia, there is potential to generate 7,350TWh/y while the Pacific region could provide a further 2,300TWh/y.

Key reasons to purchase this research
  • What are the drivers shaping and influencing concentrating solar power technology development in the electricity industry?
  • What does concentrating solar power generation cost? What will it cost in the future?
  • Which concentrating solar power technology types will be the winners and which the losers in terms of power generated, cost and viability?
  • Which concentrating solar power technology types are likely to find favor with manufacturers moving forward?
  • Which emerging technologies are gaining in popularity and why?
Table of Contents
Dr Paul Breeze
Disclaimer
Executive summary
An introduction to concentrating solar thermal power generation
The solar resource
Solar thermal basics
Parabolic trough solar thermal power plants
Solar tower power plants
Parabolic dish solar power plants
Fresnel reflector solar thermal power plants
Other solar thermal technologies
The economics of concentrating solar power generation
The prospects for concentrating solar power

CHAPTER 1 AN INTRODUCTION TO CONCENTRATING SOLAR THERMAL POWER

generation
Summary
Introduction
The structure of the report

CHAPTER 2 THE SOLAR RESOURCE

Summary
Introduction
The solar potential
Resource data

CHAPTER 3 SOLAR THERMAL BASICS

Summary
Introduction
Energy collection
Energy storage
Energy conversion
Hybrid plants
Electricity transport
Principle types of solar thermal power plant

CHAPTER 4 PARABOLIC TROUGH SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANTS

Summary
Introduction
Parabolic trough technology
Power generation
Energy storage
Commercial parabolic trough plants
Hybrid solar thermal power plants
Technology advances
Parabolic trough plant costs
Parabolic trough plant development

CHAPTER 5 SOLAR TOWER POWER PLANTS

Summary
Introduction
Solar tower technology
Power generation
Energy storage
Experimental solar tower projects
Commercial solar tower plants
Projects under development
Solar tower economics

CHAPTER 6 PARABOLIC DISH SOLAR POWER PLANTS

Summary
Introduction
Parabolic dish technology
Power generation
Parabolic dish prototypes and development programmes
Commercial parabolic dish projects
Parabolic dish economics

CHAPTER 7 FRESNEL REFLECTOR SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANTS

Summary
Introduction
Fresnel reflector collection systems
Power generation
Demonstration and commercial Fresnel reflector power plants
Fresnel collector economics

CHAPTER 8 OTHER SOLAR THERMAL TECHNOLOGIES

Summary
Introduction
Solar chimneys
Solar ponds
Solar pond projects

CHAPTER 9 THE ECONOMICS OF CONCENTRATING SOLAR POWER GENERATION

Summary
Introduction
Capital costs
The levelized cost of power from concentrating solar thermal power plants

CHAPTER 10 THE PROSPECTS FOR CONCENTRATING SOLAR POWER

Summary
Introduction
Transmission of CSP
Comparative capital cost of CSP
Levelized cost comparisons
The potential for growth in CSP
Regional growth potential
The outlook for CSP

APPENDIX

Bibliography/References

TABLE OF FIGURES

Figure 1: Global solar thermal electricity production (GWh), 2009
Figure 2: Estimated regional solar thermal potential, 2009
Figure 3: Cost breakdown for typical parabolic trough plant (%)
Figure 4: SEGS parabolic trough power plants, 2010
Figure 5: Hybrid parabolic trough power plants (MW), 2010
Figure 6: Solar Two efficiency figures (%)
Figure 7: Breakdown of costs for the original Solar Tres solar tower project (%)
Figure 8: Breakdown of costs for a hypothetical 50MW solar dish power plant (%)
Figure 9: Predicted capital cost for solar thermal power plants ($/kW), 2010
Figure 10: Predicted levelized cost of electricity from concentrating solar thermal power plants ($/MWh), 2010
Figure 11: EIA comparison of overnight capital costs for power generation technologies ($/kW), 2009

103

Figure 12: CEC overnight costs of power generation technologies; all plants enter service in 2009 ($/kW)
Figure 13: EIA average levelized cost for plants entering service in the US in 2016 ($/MWh)
Figure 14: Average levelized cost for plants entering service in California in 2009 ($/MWh)
Figure 15: Global capacities for conventional and renewable generation technologies (GW), 2009
Figure 16: Average electricity cost for conventional and renewable generation technologies, 2009
Figure 17: Predicted generation from solar thermal power plants as a proportion of total electricity consumption to 2050
Figure 18: Predicted cumulative CSP capacity under different growth scenarios to 2050 (MW)
Figure 19: Solar thermal potential in the western states of the US, 2009
Figure 20: Potential annual solar thermal output, China and India (TWh), 2010

TABLE OF TABLES

Table 1: Global solar thermal electricity production (GWh), 2009
Table 2: Solar energy, 2010
Table 3: Estimated regional solar thermal potential, 2009
Table 4: Solar thermal power plant characteristics
Table 5: Typical parabolic trough plant parameters for a 50MW plant, 2009
Table 6: Cost breakdown for typical parabolic trough plant (%)
Table 7: SEGS parabolic trough power plants
Table 8: New parabolic trough power plants (MW), 2010
Table 9: Hybrid parabolic trough power plants (MW), 2010
Table 10: Typical solar tower plant parameters, 2009
Table 11: Experimental solar tower projects
Table 12: Solar Two efficiency figures (%)
Table 13: PS10 and PS20 plant specifications, 2009
Table 14: Gemasolar solar tower specification, 2010
Table 15: Key features of proposed Ivanpah solar tower development, 2010
Table 16: Breakdown of costs for the original Solar Tres solar tower project (%)
Table 17: Key parameters for a typical parabolic dish solar unit, 2010
Table 18: Solar dish experimental programmes and prototypes (kW), 2010
Table 19: The Solarplant 1 technical specification, 2010
Table 20: The Australian National University SG4 Big Dish specification, 2010
Table 21: Breakdown of costs for a hypothetical 50MW solar dish power plant (%)
Table 22: Typical Fresnel reflector power plant parameters, 2010
Table 23: Linear Fresnel reflector power plants, 2010
Table 24: Kimberlina power plant characteristics, 2010
Table 25: Characteristics of the Fresdemo pilot project, 2010
Table 26: Capital costs for operating solar thermal power plants and for plants under construction, 2010
Table 27: Predicted capital cost for solar thermal power plants ($/kW), 2010
Table 28: Predicted levelized cost of electricity from concentrating solar thermal power plants ($/MWh), 2010
Table 29: EIA comparison of overnight capital costs for power generation technologies, 2009
Table 30: CEC overnight costs of power generation technologies; all plants enter service in 2009 ($/kW)
Table 31: EIA average levelized cost for plants entering service in the US in 2016 ($/MWh)
Table 32: Average levelized cost for plants entering service in California in 2009 ($/MWh)
Table 33: Average electricity cost and global capacities for conventional and renewable generation technologies, 2009
Table 34: Predicted generation from solar thermal power plants as a proportion of total electricity consumption to 2050
Table 35: Predicted cumulative CSP capacity under different growth scenarios to 2050 (MW)
Table 36: Potential solar thermal generation in Europe and North Africa to 2030
Table 37: Solar thermal potential in the western states of the US, 2009
Table 38: Potential annual solar thermal output, China and India (TWh), 2010
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Analyzing Solar Power Technologies US$ 500.00 Jun, 2011 · 605 pages

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