Next Generation Energy Food and Drinks: Success Strategies for Consumer Targeting, Natural and Sustained Release Energy

Date: October 22, 2010
Pages: 115
Price:
US$ 4,795.00
Publisher: Business Insights
Report type: Strategic Report
Delivery: E-mail Delivery (PDF)
ID: N2B36459268EN
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Next Generation Energy Food and Drinks: Success Strategies for Consumer Targeting, Natural and Sustained Release Energy
The need of the consumer for an ever-greater ability to work and play is increasing the demand for an energy fix in the form of foods and beverages. However, with work stress and fatigue increasing and the demand for products with a broader health appeal will likely lead energy replacement products additional functional benefits. This is in contrast to the current appeal of energy products which are limited to a penetration within the 18-30 year age group. This shift in marketing to 'energy' products plus other benefits will bring about an evolution within the energy market and new food and beverage categories.

The focus of this report will be to explore through 2 primary segments:Introduction to energy market: Provides an overview of the historical development of energy foods and drinks and the commercial origins dating back to 1938; Who is the energy consumer: This chapter reviews the key financial indices of the energy market in the EU, US and Asia. Current market size, growth and forecasts. rbcn0012

Scope of this research
  • A comprehensive review of the issues impacting the energy category in one report from brand analysis, consumer insights to market data and regulation.
  • Insights into the current marketing and formulation strategies of the leading energy products and brands setting the pace for marketing the benefits.
  • An in-depth review of the energy drink consumer with specific insights into age, gender and neurophysiological aspects.
  • A breakdown of the growth of the energy food and beverage in the USA, EU and Japan and the predicted within specific EU countries.
  • Review of legislation and litigations currently impacting the marketing of energy based foods and beverages within the EU and USA.

Research and analysis highlights

To date there are 13 caffeine specific submissions to the health claims process and a selection of product claims but only one which is specific to the energy market. However, no claims on caffeine (the staple ingredient in energy products) have been issued as an opinion by EFSA which could be ultimately added to the community list.

The global market for energy food and drinks is estimated at $30.4bn in 2010 with a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 6.8% in the 2009-2010, period. By 2014 the market is expected to reach $38.7bn and although growth has slowed it has remain strong at 5.56%.

This EU’s acceptance of functional products has resulted in a total energy food and beverage market for the EU is $7bn and set to rise to $8.5bn by 2014 (5.5% CAGR 2006-2014). The EU energy drink market is worth an estimated $6bn in 2010 with growth expected to achieve an average of 5% (CAGR 06-14).

Key reasons to purchase this research
  • Where did the energy market emerge from was it Asia? And how did it evolve to meet the needs of today's consumers?
  • What is consumer, lifestyle and demographic data telling us about what the consumer needs from and energy products and what ingredients are accepted?
  • What are the regulatory threats and opportunities facing the energy drink market over the next 5 years?
  • What lessons are to be learned from the 10 of the most innovative products gracing the energy category?
  • Which European country has the fastest growing Energy market and set to dominate until 2014?
Table of Contents
About the author
Disclaimer
Introduction
Who are energy food consumers?
The market for energy foods and drinks
Regulating and marketing energy foods
Product innovations and opportunities in the energy food and drinks market
Success strategies in the energy category

CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION

Summary
Introduction
The history of the energy drinks market
The history of the energy food market
What is this report about?
Report methodology and report structure
Methodology
Report structure

CHAPTER 2 WHO ARE ENERGY FOOD CONSUMERS?

Summary
Introduction
Socio-demographics
Lifestyle and energy perceptions
Sleep and tiredness
Exercise
The physiological impact of energy products
Cognitive impact
Physiological impact
Sunlight
Capitalize on caffeine

CHAPTER 3 THE MARKET FOR ENERGY FOODS AND DRINKS

Summary
Introduction
The global energy foods and drinks market
Market value and growth, 2005–11
The European energy food and drinks market
  Market value and growth 2006–14
  Drinks
  Food
  Per capita growth
  Drinks
  Food
The US energy foods and drinks market
  Market value and growth 2006–14
  Drinks
  Food
  Per capita growth
The Asia Pacific energy foods and drinks market
  Market value and growth 2005–11
  Drinks
  Foods
  Per capita growth
  Drinks
  Foods
General trends across food and beverage markets

CHAPTER 4 REGULATION AND MARKETING

Summary
Introduction
Lessons from self-regulation – ASA case studies
Red Bull
Vitabiotics
The Coca-Cola Company
Europe and energy drinks – what is a safe dose?
Health claims – adjudications so far for the energy category
US – poorly regulated, and challenges are mounting
Australian survey identifies regulatory misconduct in energy drinks
Regulations – the New Zealand loophole
Current regulations
The energy drink survey
Conclusions

CHAPTER 5 PRODUCT INNOVATIONS AND OPPORTUNITIES

Summary
Introduction
Women and energy
Engaging the seniors market – energy or cognitive alertness?
Kids are an opportunity – But only without caffeine
Caffeine-free energy drinks
Innovation in the energy drinks market
Relaxation drinks
On-trade energy drinks
Natural energy drinks
Libido-boosting energy drinks
Novelty positioning for energy drinks
Innovation in the energy food market
Chocolate energy spreads across the EU
All day energy from food giants
Energy from meat
Healthy benefits and energy from a sweetener
Energy snacks beyond caffeine

CHAPTER 6 SUCCESS STRATEGIES FOR THE ENERGY CATEGORY

Summary
Introduction
Six successful strategies for energy products
Energy – A product you feel
Safe and natural alternatives to synthetic energy
Ingredient innovation
Regulatory compliance
Audience-related
Packaging and premiumization
Appendix
Interview with Nick Bildner, director of Pulsin' UK
Interview with Kris Yule, owner of Go Fast Sports UK Ltd
References

TABLE OF FIGURES

Figure 1: Original Lucozade labels identifying its energizing properties
Figure 2: Lipovitan D from Taisho Pharmaceuticals
Figure 3: Krating Daeng from TC Pharmaceutical, founded in 1962
Figure 4: Front and back of pack of Pillsbury Company's Space Food Sticks, 1969
Figure 5: PowerBar, launched in 1982, and Snickers Charged with added caffeine and taurine, launched in 2008
Figure 6: Perceptions about caffeine
Figure 7: Global sales and growth of energy food and beverage market
Figure 8: Growth and sales of energy drinks (2006–14)
Figure 9: Growth and sales of sport and energy bars (2006–14)
Figure 10: European energy drinks market value ($m) and growth (2006–14)
Figure 11: European energy food market value ($m) and growth (2006–14)
Figure 12: US energy drinks market value ($m) and growth (2006–14)
Figure 13: US energy food market value ($m) and growth (2006–14)
Figure 14: Asia Pacific energy drinks market value ($m) and growth (2006–14)
Figure 15: Asia Pacific energy food market value ($m) and growth (2006–14)
Figure 16: Female focused energy drinks: Her energy drink and Cougar shots
Figure 17: Resource SeniorActiv from Nestle Nutrition
Figure 18: Resource Energy from Nestle Nutrition
Figure 19: Kid Fuel from Clear Beverage Corp
Figure 20: Natural Energy Shots from Modjo Life
Figure 21: iChill and MiniChill relaxation shots
Figure 22: Slow Cow from Slow Cow Drink Inc
Figure 23: ED Special FX from Hartwall Ltd
Figure 24: Go Fast from Go Fast Sports & Beverage UK Ltd
Figure 25: Libigrow and Libigirl sexual energy shots from Libigrow LLC
Figure 26: Tru Blood, manufactured by Omni Consumer Products and FMCG Manufacturing Co, licensed by HBO
Figure 27: Tru Blood online sales channel
Figure 28: Blood Energy Potion from Harcos LLC
Figure 29: Pancracio Uno al Dia (One a Day)
Figure 30: Chocosport from La Suissa Chocolife
Figure 31: Energy chocolate in chew and traditional chocolate bar format
Figure 32: Star Trek/Kellogg’s 1966 promotional box of Sugar Smacks
Figure 33: Wheaties Fuel from General Mills
Figure 34: Perky Jerky from PEMS LLC
Figure 35: Lightning Rods Energy Beef Sticks from Power Hungry Foods LLC
Figure 36: FRS Health Energy drink with stevia
Figure 37: Awareness versus availability of selected cognitive health ingredients
Figure 38: Energy Bomb from Pulsin' Ltd
Figure 39: Loaded stamina shot
Figure 40: Go Fast coconut energy drink, including stevia
Figure 41: Chocosport, the energy chocolate
Figure 42: TapouT energy drink
Figure 43: Blood Energy Potion from Harcos LLC
Figure 44: Blood Energy Potion marketing ad from Harcos LLC

TABLE OF TABLES

Table 1: European energy drinks market value per capita ($) and growth (2010–14), by country
Table 2: European energy food market value per capita ($) and growth (2010–14), by country
Table 3: Asia Pacific energy drinks market value per capita ($) and growth (2010–14), by country
Table 4: Asia Pacific energy food market value per capita ($) and growth (2010–14), by country
Table 5: EFSA submissions for caffeine under Article 13.1
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