Food Safety and Traceability Strategies: Key Hazards, Risks and Technological Developments

Date: July 22, 2010
Pages: 144
Price:
US$ 2,875.00
Publisher: Business Insights
Report type: Strategic Report
Delivery: E-mail Delivery (PDF)
ID: F30A8440831EN
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Food Safety and Traceability Strategies: Key Hazards, Risks and Technological Developments
Food safety is and remains a top ten concern for food manufacturers and other food businesses. But a series of major food poisoning outbreaks and contamination incidents over the last three years have served to focus the attention of the media, consumer groups and enforcement authorities worldwide on the activities of the food industry as never before. This critical environment is set to become a key driver for food businesses to strengthen the measures they take to ensure the safety and traceability of their products. The pressure to introduce more robust systems and technologies is growing as the requirements of legislation and the demands of key customers continue to expand.

Conversely, while industry safety practices may be under the spotlight, the growing demands on businesses may also present an opportunity. Early adoption of developing technologies and systems for managing food safety and traceability can demonstrate corporate responsibility and commitment to the protection of consumers and shareholders. For some businesses, a visibly responsible attitude to food safety is set to become an asset, which has the potential to deliver added value and competitiveness, if communicated effectively.

This report brings together the major food safety challenges currently facing food businesses and the complex driving forces being applied to the industry. These drivers are then related to some important technologies and systems being developed to enhance the management of food safety and traceability. Those technologies are analysed and compared in terms of their likely impact. The potential for change presented by key future developments is examined and a framework for a business strategy to cope with growing demands for food safety and traceability is presented.

Key features of this report
  • An overview of the broad range of food safety threats facing businesses and an analysis of the main sources and causes of those threats.
  • An assessment of the key influences driving food safety and traceability enhancement including legislation and the demands of major customers.
  • Comparative analysis of significant new food processing methods and other ancillary technologies and their likely impact on food safety.
  • Assessment of the potential role of new packaging technologies in food safety assurance.

Scope of this report
  • Gain a broad understanding of the strategic significance of product safety and traceability in the overall context of the modern food industry.
  • Assess the potential for investment in food safety and traceability technologies to provide real benefits and a competitive advantage for your business.
  • Be aware of the range of new food safety technologies and services available to businesses, their benefits and drawbacks and their potential to provide return on investment.
  • Understand the real potential for food safety benefits to be gained from new packaging technologies.
  • Gain an insight into the importance and value of effective traceability systems in managing food safety.

Key Market Issues
  • The key threats to food safety and their sources can be identified, but threats can also arise from unexpected directions. How can businesses best prepare themselves for rapidly emerging threats?
  • Many technologies have been developed and marketed with a view to enhancing food safety, but which of them have the potential to provide real business benefits in the long term?
  • The potential role of ‘smart packaging’ in food safety is much hyped, but the real benefits may be limited by current technology. The development of nanotechnology applications is set to alter the equation dramatically.
  • Pressure to improve the traceability of products in the food supply chain beyond current legal requirements is growing. Will the technologies currently available, or close to market, make this possible?

Key findings from this report
  • Contamination problems originate from well regulated domestic suppliers as well as from imported products.
  • Manufacturers need to establish as much control as possible over their supply chains.
  • Food safety is becoming an important factor in the overall issue of corporate responsibility.
  • The demands of retailers and customers now have a strong influence on food safety policy and practice in many businesses.
  • Some alternative food processing technologies have food safety and quality advantages, but these may be outweighed by increased costs, regulatory hurdles and consumer resistance.
  • Many active and intelligent packaging technologies add significantly to production costs and potential benefits are still uncertain.
  • Traceability is a vital element of food safety in terms of identifying and controlling contamination incidents.
  • Managing traceability data using ‘cloud computing’ software solutions accessed via the Internet is a cost-effective way to deal with growing future demands for traceability data.

Key questions answered
  • What are the most significant threats to food safety faced by manufacturers and other food businesses?
  • Where do the majority of reported food safety threats and food contaminants originate?
  • What are the human and financial consequences of a failure in food safety management or a contamination incident?
  • How are businesses responding to growing food safety demands from retailers and other customers?
  • Can novel food processing technologies and systems make a meaningful contribution to food safety?
  • Does new packaging technology have a real role in product safety in the food industry?
Food Safety and Traceability Strategies
Food safety hazards
Legislation and market drivers
Food safety technologies in manufacturing
Packaging technologies designed to improve food safety
Traceability systems and technologies
Future outlook for food safety and traceability

CHAPTER 1 FOOD SAFETY HAZARDS

Summary
Introduction
Food safety
Traceability
Business responsibilities
Threats, hazards and risks
Biological hazards
The burden of food borne disease caused by biological hazards
Bacteria
Viruses
Parasites
Food allergens
Chemical hazards
Natural biological toxins
Environmental contaminants
Processing contaminants
Contaminants derived from food contact materials
Adulterants
Physical contaminants
Identifying the major sources of food safety threats
EU RASFF system
Underlying reasons for a poor food safety record
China
Iran and Turkey
US
Options for food and drinks manufacturers

CHAPTER 2 LEGISLATION AND MARKET DRIVERS

Summary
Introduction
Legislation
European Union
US
State legislation
Japan
China
HACCP implications
Packaging legislation
Impact of legislation on international trade
International standards and codes of practice
Codex Alimentarius
Other international standards and codes
Other initiatives
US initiatives
Corporate responsibility
Case study 1 – Kellogg Company
Consumer perceptions
Business perceptions
Customer demands
Case study 2 - GFSI
Other factors
Pressure groups
Trade associations
The cost of food safety and traceability
Conclusion

CHAPTER 3 FOOD SAFETY TECHNOLOGIES IN MANUFACTURING

Summary
Introduction
Processing technologies
High pressure processing
Pulsed electric field
Alternative heating technologies
Microwave processing
Decontamination technologies
Irradiation
Ozonation
Bacteriophages
Novel preservatives
Natural preservatives
Commercial outlook
IT-based food safety technologies
Food safety management software
Predictive modeling
Testing and analysis
Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)
Lateral flow assays

CHAPTER 4 PACKAGING TECHNOLOGIES DESIGNED TO IMPROVE FOOD SAFETY

Summary
Introduction
Protection and preservation
Active packaging
Active packaging technologies
Antimicrobial films
Nanotechnology
Intelligent packaging
Intelligent packaging technologies
Pathogen detection devices
Active and intelligent packaging trends
Tamper-evident packaging
Case study 3- Masterfoods
Tamper-evident technologies

CHAPTER 5 TRACEABILITY SYSTEMS & TECHNOLOGIES

Summary
Introduction
The concept of traceability
Case study 4: Tracing sources of contaminated peanut butter
Traceability systems
Essential components of a traceability system
Traceability system technologies
Barcodes
RFID- based systems
Other labelling technologies
Traceability data management solutions
Conclusion

CHAPTER 6 FUTURE OUTLOOK FOR FOOD SAFETY AND TRACEABILITY

Summary
Introduction
Factors influencing future food safety development
Legislation
Certification schemes and standards
Green issues and climate change
Demand for healthier foods
Managing food allergens
Technological developments
Automation and robotics
Rapid test methods
The cost of food safety and traceability
Recommendations
Developing a food safety framework
Glossary
Index

LIST OF FIGURES

Figure 1.1: Key bacteria hazards: Threat vs. incidence
Figure 1.2: EU RASFF most common reported hazards (number of notifications), 2008
Figure 1.3: EU RASFF top five number of notifications by country of origin, 2008
Figure 2.4: Logic sequence for application of HACCP
Figure 2.5: Economic fallout from a food safety incident
Figure 2.6: Ranking of food safety in the annual CIES 'Top of Mind' survey, 2001-2010
Figure 3.7: Key food safety technologies in manufacturing: Impact/importance vs. cost
Figure 3.8: High pressure processing unit
Figure 3.9: Pulsed electric field processing
Figure 3.10: E-beam equipment
Figure 3.11: Schematic of the PCR process
Figure 4.12: Ageless active packaging sachets
Figure 4.13: Timestrip TTI labels
Figure 4.14: Total global active and intelligent packaging market size for the food and drinks industry ($m), 2009-2015
Figure 4.15: Examples of tamper-evident seals
Figure 4.16: Experimental tamper-evident technology
Figure 5.17: Information required when designing a food business traceability system
Figure 5.18: Traditional EAN-13 barcode symbol
Figure 5.19: Data matrix 2D barcode symbol
Figure 5.20: An electronic product code RFID tag of the type used by Wal-Mart
Figure 5.21: Estimated size of the market for RFID tags and systems in the farming and food industries ($m), 2010-2016
Figure 6.22: Key future considerations for food safety and traceability
Figure 6.23: Costs and benefits of food safety and traceability systems
Figure 6.24: Framework for a food safety and traceability enhancement strategy

LIST OF TABLES

Table 1.1: Incidence of laboratory-confirmed bacterial and parasitic infection per 100,000 population, 2008
Table 2.2: Related standards to ISO 22000
Table 2.3: Costs borne by Kellogg in relation to an outbreak of Salmonella Typhimurium food poisoning in the US, 2008/2009
Table 2.4: Schemes currently recognized by the GFSI
Table 2.5: US food poisoning outbreaks associated with nuts (number of cases), 2008
Table 4.6: Examples of active packaging technologies
Table 4.7: Examples of intelligent packaging technologies
Table 6.8: Average annual costs of implementing the FDA HACCP regulation by business size ($)
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