Biomarkers Hold potential to Predict Disease Susceptibility, Reports GBI Research

27 Nov 2012 • by Natalie Aster

The traditional ‘blockbuster model’ of drug development is coming under fire, as scientists increasingly look towards personalized medicines as the future of pharmaceuticals.

The new report, "Biomarkers in Drug Discovery - Integration in Early Stage Promotes Use of Companion Diagnostics to Optimize Therapeutic Outcomes" by GBI Research, argues that biomarkers are making waves in drug discovery, revealing the possibility of analyzing an individual’s medical nature and needs remotely.

Report Details:

Biomarkers in Drug Discovery - Integration in Early Stage Promotes Use of Companion Diagnostics to Optimize Therapeutic Outcomes
Published: November, 2012
Pages: 87
Price: US$ 3.150,00

According to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), a biomarker is a characteristic that can be objectively measured and evaluated as an indicator of biologic processes, or as biological responses to a therapeutic treatment, generally existing as specific enzyme or hormone concentrations. The report notes that biomarkers therefore hold the potential to predict disease susceptibility, can detect and monitor disease progression for CNS, CVS, cancer, autoimmune, metabolic and infectious diseases, and can also act as a guiding force in drug development and evaluation.

Historically, drug R&D processes considered the response to a drug on the majority of patients, representing a ‘one-size-fits-all’ approach, or ’blockbuster’ model. Now, an emergence of personalized medicine allows an individual’s treatment to be designed according to genetic codes, ensuring a reduction in drug discovery costs and an increase in treatment success.

Promising biomarkers that have already been discovered include biomarkers of neurodegeneration, which correlate better than A? biomarkers with the clinical symptoms of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) and are better suited for use in clinical trials. A huge number of potential biomarkers of prognosis and diagnosis in Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) have also been investigated, and autoantibody tests and inflammatory markers are routinely tested in clinical practice. In addition to this, novel, new, non-invasive serum markers are being developed to monitor the progression of Hepatitis C and its response to therapy, in comparison to previously-used liver biopsies.

More information can be found in the report “Biomarkers in Drug Discovery - Integration in Early Stage Promotes Use of Companion Diagnostics to Optimize Therapeutic Outcomes” by GBI Research.

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