DNA Microarray Market Trends (Installed Base, Applications, Purchase Plans and the Impact of Next-Gen Sequencing)

14 Nov 2011 • by Natalie Aster

New York — DNA Microarrays are utilized heavily by research labs for a number of tasks such as gene profiling, RNA detection and SNP analysis. But as Kalorama Information's report “DNA Microarray Market Trends (Installed Base, Applications, Purchase Plans and The Impact of Next-Gen Sequencing)” indicates, the market for these systems is about to experience change. The report is the result of surveys carried out with microarray labs to determine the current state of the microarray market and attempt to predict the future direction of the technologies.

Report Details:

DNA Microarray Market Trends (Installed Base, Applications, Purchase Plans and The Impact of Next-Gen Sequencing)
Published: October 2011
Pages: 100
Price: US$ 3,500.00

Report Sample Abstract

Purchase Plans

“We are looking to do next-gen sequencing more for methylation. But for gene expression profiling, it is not really there yet.”

“We will still be using microarrays a lot; because we do a lot of LCM, and they haven’t developed tools yet for next-gen sequencing for that. There are some things that we have never done with microarrays, like SNPs (because it is a long setup with Affymetrix) that might be done with next-gen sequencers. We are looking at a mixed platform like the HiScan, to do SNPs on arrays and sequencing on the same system.”

“We are not sure yet; we've done microarrays for 10 yrs, and it is still going strong. Next-gen sequencing is the big thing right now, so there is some competition. But microarrays will hold for a few years. If we buy something new, it would probably be a next-gen sequencer, just because there is probably not enough additional demand to justify buying another microarray system.”

“Next-gen sequencing will replace microarrays. Illumina has been good with the RNA-seq being low-priced, and providing more information. Our university has two next-gen sequencers installed, and we will try to transition to that in the next 2 years. SNP arrays will still be needed, but gene expression arrays to a lesser extent.”

“There are definitely different uses for the microarrays vs next-gen sequencers, because next-gen sequencers don’t handle gene expression analysis as well as hoped. That is because there is not enough power in the data to measure changes in about XX% of the genes... only about XX% have enough reads and have sufficient quality of data.”

“Right now there is not much effect; we run the same number of samples. Microarrays are still cheaper by a factor of three-fold for an RNA-seq experiment; but prices will keep coming down and throughput will go up, and we will switch over. Exon arrays are actually pretty close in price now. In our lab, one challenge is the large number of samples in the 100s per month. The data analysis, the large number of data points, also gets complicated. Transferring the data around is challenging, with terabytes coming from next-gen sequencers.

More information can be found in the report “DNA Microarray Market Trends (Installed Base, Applications, Purchase Plans and The Impact of Next-Gen Sequencing)” by Kalorama Information.

To order the report or ask for sample pages contact ps@marketpublishers.com

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