The Public Safety LTE & Mobile Broadband Market: 2014 - 2020

Date: March 1, 2014
Pages: 261
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Publisher: Signals and Systems Telecom
Report type: Strategic Report
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The Public Safety LTE & Mobile Broadband Market: 2014 - 2020
Considering its thriving ecosystem, spectrum flexibility and performance metrics, public safety organizations worldwide recognize LTE as the de-facto standard for mission critical mobile broadband communications.

With spectrum already allocated, public safety agencies in the Middle East, Asia Pacific and the U.S have already begun to operate private LTE networks. Driven by public safety demands, LTE products can now also operate in spectrum bands previously unthinkable, such as the 400 MHz band, which is widely available to public safety agencies worldwide. Moreover, demands for tactical and rapidly deployable broadband solutions have also led vendors to develop private LTE base station products in a variety of innovative form factors such as Cell in a Box (CIAB) or airborne cells.

SNS Research estimates the global spending on private LTE infrastructure including base stations (eNodeBs), mobile core (EPC) and backhaul will account for $2 Billion annually by the end of 2020. By the same time, the installed base of private public safety LTE base stations (eNode Bs) will reach nearly 155,000 globally, following a CAGR of nearly 60% between 2014 and 2020, and will serve nearly 4 Million private public safety LTE subscribers worldwide.

However it is important to note that the transition to LTE is one of the will be one of the most complex technical changes the public safety communications industry will ever witness and will present challenges in its own right, particularly in the context of global standardization. Furthermore spectrum, regulatory and budgetary issues in certain regions such as Europe will delay large scale private deployments.

Nonetheless, service prioritization partnerships with commercial LTE network carriers will create an ecosystem for operating public safety devices over commercial LTE networks during this transition period. We estimate that public safety LTE device shipments over commercial networks will account for nearly $7 Billion in annual revenue by the end of 2020.

The 'The Public Safety LTE & Mobile Broadband Market: 2014 - 2020' report presents an in-depth assessment of the global public safety LTE market, besides considering the wider LMR and mobile broadband industries. In addition to covering the business case, challenges, spectrum allocation strategies, industry roadmap, deployment case studies, vendor products, strategies, standardization activities and application ecosystem for public safety LTE, the report also presents comprehensive forecasts for mobile broadband, LMR and public safety LTE subscriptions from 2011 till 2020. Also covered are public safety LTE service revenues as well as device and infrastructure (eNodeB base stations, EPC mobile core, backhaul) shipment and associated revenue forecasts.

The report comes with an associated XLS datasheet covering quantitative data from all figures presented within the report, as well as a list and associated details of 46 global private public safety LTE network deployments (as of Q1’2014).
1 CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION

1.1 Executive Summary
1.2 Key Findings
1.3 Topics Covered
1.4 Forecast Segmentation
1.5 Key Questions Answered
1.6 Methodology
1.7 Target Audience
1.8 Companies Mentioned

2 CHAPTER 2: AN OVERVIEW OF THE PUBLIC SAFETY MOBILE BROADBAND MARKET

2.1 Narrowband Land Mobile Radio (LMR) Systems in Public Safety
  2.1.1 LMR Market Size
  2.1.3 The Limitations of LMR Data Capabilities
  2.1.2 The Perceived Role of Mobile Broadband in Public Safety Scenarios
2.3 How big is the Mobile Broadband Market?
2.2 Mobile Broadband for Public Safety
  2.2.1 Partnerships with Commercial Carriers
  2.2.2 Private LTE and WiMAX Deployments
  2.3.2 What are the Growth Drivers?
  2.3.1 Will the Public Safety Segment Witness the Same Level of Growth as the Consumer Segment?
  2.3.3 LMR Systems will Continue to Support Mission-Critical Voice
  2.5.1 Performance Metrics
2.5 Why LTE?
2.4 Why use Commercial Mobile Broadband Technology for Public Safety
  2.5.3 A Thriving Ecosystem
  2.5.2 Coexistence, Interoperability and Spectrum Flexibility
  2.5.4 OPEX Reduction
2.6 Public Safety LTE Technology & Architecture
  2.6.1 E-UTRAN - LTE Radio Access Network
  2.6.2 TDD vs. FDD
  2.6.3 UE (User Equipment)
    2.6.3.1 USB Data Cards
    2.6.3.3 Smartphones & Handheld LMR Terminals
    2.6.3.4 Tablets & Laptops
    2.6.3.2 Vehicular Modems
    2.6.4.2 PGW (Packet Data Network Gateway)
  2.6.4 Public Safety LTE EPC (Evolved Packet Core)
    2.6.4.1 SGW (Serving Gateway)
    2.6.4.4 HSS (Home Subscriber Server)
    2.6.4.3 MME (Mobility Management Entity)
    2.6.4.5 PCRF (Policy Charging and Rules Function)
  2.6.5 LMR Network Integration and Inter-Working
  2.6.7 Inter-System Roaming
  2.6.8 Intra-System Roaming to Commercial Carriers
  2.6.6 Support for Roaming in Public Safety LTE
  2.6.9 The Evolution to LTE-Advanced and its Implications for Public Safety
  2.7.1 Private Public Satiety LTE Network Deployments
  2.7.3 Public Safety LTE Access over Commercial Networks
2.7 Public Safety LTE Deployment Models
  2.7.2 Shared Commercial Public Safety LTE (Private-Public Partnerships)
  2.8.1 Built, Owned and Operated by Integrator/Vendor
2.8 Funding Models for Private Public Safety LTE Network Deployment
  2.7.4 Hosted Core Public Safety LTE Networks
  2.8.2 Owned and Operated by the Government Authority
  2.8.3 Local Agency Hosted Core
  2.8.4 Multiple Networks
  2.9.3 Bandwidth Flexibility
  2.9.2 Economic Feasibility
  2.9.1 Higher throughput and Low Latency
  2.9.4 Spectral Efficiency
2.9 The Public Safety LTE Business Case
  2.9.6 Lack of Competition from Other Standards
  2.9.5 Regional Interoperability
  2.9.8 Commitments by Infrastructure and Device vendors
  2.9.7 Endorsement from the Public Safety Community
  2.9.9 Quality of Service (QoS) & Priority Provisioning
  2.9.10 Support for Group Voice & Multimedia Communication
2.10 Challenges to the Public Safety LTE Ecosystem
  2.10.1 Spectrum Allocation
  2.10.3 Budgetary Issues
  2.10.2 Interworking with LMR Networks & Standardization
  2.10.4 Security & Resilience
  2.10.5 Support for Mission-Critical Voice and Direct Mode-Operation
  2.10.7 Lack of Specifications for Battery Life in Public Safety Scenarios
  2.10.6 Smaller Coverage Footprint to Comparison to LMR Systems
  2.10.8 User Profiles to Fit Public Safety Requirements

3 CHAPTER 3: PUBLIC SAFETY LTE AND MOBILE BROADBAND INDUSTRY ROADMAP

3.1 Industry Roadmap
3.2 2011 – 2013: The Disparate Networks Era
3.3 2014 – 2016: Mission Critical Data over Private LTE
3.4 2017 – 2020: Emergence of Mission Critical Voice and Proximity Services
3.5 Public Safety LTE Deployment & Trial Case Studies
  3.5.1 Zhengzhou Metro
  3.5.2 Harris County
  3.5.4 Oman Royal Office
  3.5.3 Qatar MOI
  3.5.5 Turkish National Police Force
  3.5.7 China’s Ministry of Public Security
  3.5.8 German Armed Forces
  3.5.6 Hong Kong Police Force Trial

4 CHAPTER 4: PUBLIC SAFETY LTE AND MOBILE BROADBAND APPLICATIONS ECOSYSTEM

4.1 Mobile Video
4.3 GIS, AVLS and Mapping
4.2 Mobile Broadband and Seamless Mobile VPN Access
4.4 CAD (Computer Aided Dispatching)
4.5 Remote Database Access
4.6 Telemetry and Remote Diagnostics
4.7 Bulk Multimedia/Data Transfers
4.8 PTT over LTE
4.9 Situational Awareness Applications
4.10 The Present State of the Market: What’s on offer
4.11 The Numbers: How big is the Public Safety LTE Applications Ecosystem?

5 CHAPTER 5: PUBLIC SAFETY LTE & MOBILE BROADBAND VENDOR ASSESSMENT

5.1 7 layers AG
5.2 Aculab
5.3 Adax
5.4 Aeroflex
5.5 Airbus Defence and Space (Formerly Cassidian)
5.6 Airspan Networks
5.7 Alcatel-Lucent
5.8 Amdocs (Bridgewater)
5.9 Anritsu
5.10 Aricent Group
5.11 Artevea
5.12 Aviat Networks
5.13 Avtec
5.14 Axell Wireless (Acquired by Cobham)
5.15 Axis Communications
5.16 BFDX
5.17 Broadcom
5.18 CalAmp
5.19 CCTI (Catalyst Communications Technologies Inc)
5.2 Cisco
5.21 Cobham
5.22 CommScope
5.23 Covia Labs
5.24 DAMM Cellular Systems A/S
5.25 Eastcom
5.26 Ericsson
5.27 ETELM
5.28 Etherstack
5.29 EXACOM
5.3 Exalt Communications
5.31 Exelis and C4i
5.32 FREQUENTIS AG
5.33 General Dynamics C4 Systems
5.35 Harris
5.34 The Genesis Group
5.36 Hitachi
5.37 Honeywell
5.38 HQT Radio
5.39 Huawei
5.4 Hytera
5.41 iCOM
5.42 Imtradex
5.43 Intel
5.44 InterSec
5.45 Intrado
5.46 Japan Radio Company
5.47 JDI (JING DENG INDUSTRIAL)
5.48 JVC Kenwood
5.49 Kapsch CarrierCom
5.5 Kirisun
5.51 Kodiak Networks
5.52 L-3 Communications
5.53 Lemko
5.54 LiveViewGPS
5.55 Mentura Group
5.56 MODUCOM
5.57 Motorola Solutions
5.58 Mutualink
5.59 NEC
5.6 NetMotion Wireless
5.61 NextNav
5.62 NSN (Nokia Solutions & Networks)
5.63 Northrop Grumman
5.64 nTerop
5.65 Oceus Networks
5.66 Panasonic
5.67 Panorama Antennas
5.68 Phonak
5.69 Piciorgros (Funk-Electronic Piciorgros GmbH)
5.7 Polaris
5.71 Portalify Ltd (Acquired by Sepura)
5.72 POTEVIO International
5.73 PowerTrunk (Teltronic Subsidiary)
5.74 Puxing Radio
5.75 Qualcomm
5.76 RACOM
5.77 Radisys
5.78 Radio IP
5.79 Raytheon
5.8 Reality Mobile (ASTRO Solutions)
5.81 RELM Wireless
5.82 Rivada Networks
5.83 Rohill
5.84 SAIC (Science Applications International Corporation)
5.85 Samsung
5.86 Savox Communications
5.87 Selex ES
5.88 Sepura
5.89 Signalion
5.9 Simoco
5.91 SiRRAN
5.92 SmithMicro
5.93 Sonic Communications
5.94 Space Data
5.95 Star Solutions
5.96 Stop Noise
5.97 Tait
5.99 TCS (TeleCommunication Systems)
5.98 Tecore Networks
5.100 Televate
5.101 TELEX (Bosch Security Systems)
5.102 Teltronic
5.103 Telum
5.104 TETRAtab
5.105 Thales
5.106 TITAN Communication Systems
5.107 Toshiba
5.108 Twisted Pair Solutions (Acquired by Motorola Solutions)
5.109 UNIMO Technology
5.110 Utility
5.111 Vidyo
5.112 Zetron (Part of JVC Kenwood)
5.113 ZTE

6 CHAPTER 6: PUBLIC SAFETY LTE SPECTRUM ALLOCATION STRATEGIES WORLDWIDE

6.1 North America
6.3 Europe
6.2 Latin & Central America
6.4 Middle East & Africa
6.5 Asia Pacific
6.6 The Prospects of Spectrum Harmonization

7 CHAPTER 7: MARKET ANALYSIS AND FORECASTS

  7.1.1 First Responder Data Subscriptions over Public (Commercial) Cellular Networks
7.1 The Global Public Safety Mobile Broadband Market
  7.1.2 First Responder Data Subscriptions Over LMR Networks
  7.1.3 First Responder Data Subscriptions over Private Mobile Broadband
    7.1.3.2 Private Public Safety LTE and WiMAX Subscriptions Compared
    7.1.3.1 The Unreliability of Commercial Cellular Mobile Broadband Networks
  7.1.4 Private Public Safety LTE Networks
    7.1.4.1 Subscriptions over Private Public Safety LTE Networks
    7.1.4.2 Device Shipments over Private Public Safety LTE Networks
    7.1.4.3 Private Public Safety LTE Network Service Revenue
  7.1.5 Public Safety LTE over Public (Commercial) LTE Networks
    7.1.5.1 Public Safety Subscriptions over Commercial LTE Networks
    7.1.5.2 Public Safety Device Shipments over Commercial LTE Networks
    7.1.5.3 Public Safety Service Revenue over Commercial LTE Networks
    7.1.6.1 Private and Commercial Public Safety LTE Subscriptions Compared
  7.1.6 Private vs. Commercial Public Safety LTE Compared
    7.1.6.2 Private and Commercial Public Safety LTE Device Shipments Compared
    7.1.6.3 Private and Commercial Public Safety LTE Service Revenues Compared
  7.1.7 Public Safety LTE Device Shipments by Form Factor
    7.1.8.1 Commercial and Private Public Safety LTE eNodeB Shipments Compared
  7.1.8 Private Public Safety LTE eNodeB Shipments
    7.1.8.2 Regional Assessment of Private Public Safety LTE eNodeB Shipments
  7.1.9 Private Public Safety LTE eNodeB Installed Base
  7.2.1 Asia Pacific
    7.2.1.1 Private Public Safety LTE Subscriptions, Device Shipments & Service Revenues
7.2 Regional Market Assessment
    7.2.1.2 Commercial Public Safety LTE Subscriptions, Device Shipments & Service Revenues
    7.2.1.3 Private Public Safety LTE eNodeB Shipments, Revenue & Installed Base
  7.2.2 North America
    7.2.2.1 Private Public Safety LTE Subscriptions, Device Shipments & Service Revenues
    7.2.2.2 Commercial Public Safety LTE Subscriptions, Device Shipments & Service Revenues
    7.2.2.3 Private Public Safety LTE eNodeB Shipments, Revenue & Installed Base
  7.2.3 Latin & Central America
    7.2.3.1 Private Public Safety LTE Subscriptions, Device Shipments & Service Revenues
    7.2.3.2 Commercial Public Safety LTE Subscriptions, Device Shipments & Service Revenues
    7.2.3.3 Private Public Safety LTE eNodeB Shipments, Revenue & Installed Base
  7.2.4 Middle East & Africa
    7.2.4.1 Private Public Safety LTE Subscriptions, Device Shipments & Service Revenues
    7.2.4.2 Commercial Public Safety LTE Subscriptions, Device Shipments & Service Revenues
    7.2.4.3 Private Public Safety LTE eNodeB Shipments, Revenue & Installed Base
  7.2.5 Eastern Europe
    7.2.5.1 Private Public Safety LTE Subscriptions, Device Shipments & Service Revenues
    7.2.5.2 Commercial Public Safety LTE Subscriptions, Device Shipments & Service Revenues
    7.2.5.3 Private Public Safety LTE eNodeB Shipments, Revenue & Installed Base
    7.2.6.1 Private Public Safety LTE Subscriptions, Device Shipments & Service Revenues
  7.2.6 Western Europe
    7.2.6.2 Commercial Public Safety LTE Subscriptions, Device Shipments & Service Revenues
    7.2.6.3 Private Public Safety LTE eNodeB Shipments, Revenue & Installed Base

8 CHAPTER 8: STANDARDIZATION & REGULATORY INITIATIVES

8.2 NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology)
8.1 NPSTC (National Public Safety Telecommunications Council)
8.3 NTIA (National Telecommunications and Information Administration)
8.4 PSCR (Public Safety Communications Research)
8.6 3GPP (Third Generation Partnership Project)
8.5 APCO (Association of Public-Safety Communications Officials-International)
8.7 TCCA (TETRA and Critical Communications Association)
8.8 ETSI (European Telecommunications Standards Institute)
8.9 UIC (International Union of Railways)
8.10 ATIS (Alliance for Telecommunications Industry Solutions)
8.11 TIA (Telecommunications Industry Association)
8.12 Features for Public Safety LTE Standardization
  8.12.1 Group Communications
  8.12.2 Proximity based Services (3GPP ProSe)
  8.12.4 PTT Voice Application Standardization
  8.12.3 Resilience
  8.12.5 Higher Power Terminals (UEs) for Public Safety Requirements

9 CHAPTER 9: CONCLUSION AND STRATEGIC RECOMMENDATIONS

9.1 How Big is the Private Public Safety LTE/EPC Mobile Core Market?
9.2 Backhaul Investments to Support Public Safety LTE
9.3 Military & Tactical Deployments
9.4 Prospects of FirstNet
  9.4.1 Funding Prospects
  9.4.2 Is Funding the Key Constraint?
  9.4.3 Technical Constraints
  9.4.4 Moving Towards the Applications Ecosystem
  9.4.5 Halt of Early LTE Deployments: Good or Bad?
9.5 Spectrum: Will 700 MHz Gear Dominate the Market Worldwide?
  9.5.1 Prospects of 400 MHz LTE
  9.5.2 TD-LTE and Opportunities for Higher Bands in Public Safety
9.6 Proposals for Wholly Commercial Public Safety LTE Networks
  9.6.1 Case Study: UK Home Office
9.7 The Public Safety LTE MVNO Opportunity
9.8 Revenue Prospects for Commercial Carriers
9.9 TCO Analysis: Private LTE vs. Public-Private Partnerships
9.10 Mission Critical PTT over LTE
  9.10.1 Off-Network PTT/LTE-Direct: A Long Road Ahead
9.11 Standardization & Interoperability: The Key to a Successful Ecosystem
9.12 Vendor Alliances: Are there more to come?
9.13 What Cell Types will Public Safety LTE Networks Encompass?
  9.13.1 Macrocells
  9.13.2 Small Cells
  9.13.3 Macrocell Relay Nodes
  9.13.4 Tactical Cells on Wheels (COWs)
  9.13.5 Tactical Cells in a Box (CIABs)
  9.13.6 Airborne Cells
  9.14.1 Recommendations for LMR Vendors/Integrators
  9.14.2 Recommendations for LTE Infrastructure Vendors
9.14 Strategic Recommendations
  9.14.3 Recommendations for Public Safety Agencies
  9.14.4 Recommendations for Commercial Wireless Carriers
10.1 Airbus Defence and Space (Formerly Cassidian)

10 CHAPTER 10: EXPERT OPINION – INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS

10.2 General Dynamics C4 Systems
10.3 Motorola Solutions
10.4 Mentura Group
10.5 InterSec
10.6 Aculab
10.7 Anritsu

For more than 60 years first responders have relied on narrowband Land Mobile Radio (LMR) systems for mission critical voice communications. While many of these dedicated LMR systems generally support basic data applications such as short data messaging, first responders are often compelled to rely on commercial (cellular) mobile broadband networks to support data intensive applications such as bulk multimedia transfers in emergency situations.

However, commercial networks do not meet the availability and resilience requirements for public safety operations, where a single glitch in communications can result in a loss of human lives. Thus public safety agencies worldwide are echoing demands for the deployment of cost effective mobile broadband networks dedicated for public safety jsage.

While a number of public safety agencies deployed a combination of private WiMAX and proprietary technology based mobile broadband networks between 2009 and 2011 to support data intensive applications such as video surveillance, it soon became apparent that a solution that is interoperable nationwide and across borders will be necessary enable cooperation among different public safety entities, and to achieve economies of scale.

Considering its thriving ecosystem, spectrum flexibility and performance metrics, public safety organizations worldwide recognize LTE as the de-facto standard for mobile broadband.

With spectrum already allocated, public safety agencies in the Middle East, Asia Pacific and the U.S have already begun to operate private LTE networks. Driven by public safety demands, LTE products can now also operate in spectrum bands previously unthinkable, such as the 400 MHz band, which is widely available to public safety agencies worldwide. Moreover, demands for tactical and rapidly deployable broadband solutions have also led vendors to develop private LTE base station products in a variety of innovative form factors such as Cell in a Box (CIAB) or airborne cells.

SNS Research estimates the global spending on private LTE infrastructure including base stations (eNodeBs), mobile core (EPC) and backhaul will account for $2 Billion annually by the end of 2020. By the same time, the installed base of private public safety LTE base stations (eNode Bs) will reach nearly 155,000 globally, following a CAGR of nearly 60% between 2014 and 2020, and will serve nearly 4 Million private public safety LTE subscribers worldwide.

However it is important to note that the transition to LTE is one of the will be one of the most complex technical changes the public safety communications industry will ever witness and will present challenges in its own right, particularly in the context of global standardization. Furthermore spectrum, regulatory and budgetary issues in certain regions such as Europe will delay large scale private deployments.

Nonetheless, service prioritization partnerships with commercial LTE network carriers will create an ecosystem for operating public safety devices over commercial LTE networks during this transition period. We estimate that public safety LTE device shipments over commercial networks will account for nearly $7 Billion in annual revenue by the end of 2020.

This report presents an in-depth assessment of the global public safety LTE market, besides considering the wider LMR and mobile broadband industries. In addition to covering the business case, challenges, spectrum allocation strategies, industry roadmap, deployment case studies, vendor products, strategies, standardization activities and application ecosystem for public safety LTE, the report also presents comprehensive forecasts for mobile broadband, LMR and public safety LTE subscriptions from 2011 till 2020. Also covered are public safety LTE service revenues as well as device and infrastructure (eNodeB base stations, EPC mobile core, backhaul) shipment and associated revenue forecasts.

The report comes with an associated XLS datasheet covering quantitative data from all figures presented within the report, as well as a list and associated details of 46 global private public safety LTE network deployments (as of Q1'2014).

The material was prepared in March, 2014.

LIST OF FIGURES

Figure 1: Global Land Mobile Radio (LMR) Subscriptions by Technology: 2011 – 2020 (Millions)
Figure 2: Global Mobile Broadband Subscriptions by Technology: 2011 – 2020 (Millions)
Figure 3: Purpose of Using Mobile Broadband for Public Safety Applications (Survey Results - 2011 & 2013)
Figure 4: Global LTE Subscriptions: 2011 – 2020 (Millions)
Figure 5: Public Safety LTE Network Architecture
Figure 6: Global Voice over LTE (VoLTE) Subscriptions: 2011 – 2020 (Millions)
Figure 7: Public Safety LTE Industry Roadmap
Figure 8: Global Mobile Video Surveillance Market: 2011 – 2020 ($ Million)
Figure 9: PTT over LTE Application
Figure 10: The Public Safety LTE/Broadband Applications Market: 2011 – 2020 ($ Million)
Figure 11: Global First Responder Data Subscriptions over Public Cellular Networks by Technology (Millions) 2011 - 2020
Figure 12: Global First Responder Data Subscriptions over LMR Networks by Technology (Thousands) 2011 - 2020
Figure 13: Global First Responder Data Subscriptions over Private Mobile Broadband Networks by Technology (Thousands): 2011 - 2020
Figure 14: Global First Responder Subscriptions over Private Public Safety LTE Networks (Thousands): 2011 - 2020
Figure 15: First Responder Subscriptions over Private Public Safety LTE Networks by Region (Thousands): 2011 - 2020
Figure 16: Global First Responder Data Device Shipments over Private Public Safety LTE Networks (Thousands): 2011 - 2020
Figure 17: Global First Responder Data Device Shipment Revenue over Private Public Safety LTE Networks ($ Million): 2011 - 2020
Figure 18: First Responder Data Device Shipments over Private Public Safety LTE Networks by Region (Thousands): 2011 - 2020
Figure 19: First Responder Data Device Shipment Revenue over Private Public Safety LTE Networks by Region ($ Million): 2011 - 2020
Figure 20: Global Service Revenue over Private Public Safety LTE Networks ($ Million): 2011 - 2020
Figure 21: Service Revenue over Private Public Safety LTE Networks by Region ($ Million): 2011 - 2020
Figure 22: Global First Responder Subscriptions over Commercial LTE Networks (Thousands): 2011 - 2020
Figure 23: Global First Responder Subscriptions over Commercial LTE Networks by Region (Thousands): 2011 - 2020
Figure 24: Global First Responder Data Device Shipments over Commercial LTE Networks (Thousands): 2011 - 2020
Figure 25: Global First Responder Data Device Shipment Revenue over Commercial LTE Networks ($ Million): 2011 - 2020
Figure 26: First Responder Data Device Shipments over Commercial LTE Networks by Region (Thousands): 2011 - 2020
Figure 27: First Responder Data Device Shipment Revenue over Commercial LTE Networks by Region ($ Million): 2011 - 2020
Figure 28: Global Public Safety Service Revenue over Commercial LTE Networks ($ Million): 2011 - 2020
Figure 29: Public Safety Service Revenue over Commercial LTE Networks by Region ($ Million): 2011 - 2020
Figure 30: Private vs. Commercial Public Safety LTE Subscriptions Compared (Thousands): 2011 - 2020
Figure 31: Private vs. Commercial Public Safety LTE Device Shipments Compared (Thousands): 2011 - 2020
Figure 32: Private vs. Commercial Public Safety LTE Device Shipments Revenues Compared ($ Million): 2011 - 2020
Figure 33: Private vs. Commercial Public Safety LTE Service Revenues Compared ($ Million): 2011 - 2020
Figure 34: Public Safety LTE Device Shipments by Category (Thousands): 2011 - 2020
Figure 35: Global Private (Public Safety) and Commercial LTE eNodeB Shipments Compared: 2011 - 2020
Figure 36: Global Private (Public Safety) and Commercial LTE eNodeB Shipment Revenues Compared ($ Million): 2011 - 2020
Figure 37: Private (Public Safety) LTE eNodeB Shipments by Region: 2011 - 2020
Figure 38: Private (Public Safety) LTE eNodeB Shipment Revenue by Region ($ Million): 2011 - 2020
Figure 39: Private (Public Safety) LTE eNodeB Installed Base by Region: 2011 - 2020
Figure 40: First Responder Subscriptions over Private Public Safety LTE Networks in Asia Pacific (Thousands): 2011 – 2020
Figure 41: First Responder Data Device Shipments over Private Public Safety LTE Networks in Asia Pacific (Thousands): 2011 – 2020
Figure 42: First Responder Data Device Shipment Revenue over Private LTE Public Safety LTE Networks in Asia Pacific ($ Million): 2011 – 2020
Figure 43: Service Revenue over Private Public Safety LTE Networks in Asia Pacific ($ Million): 2011 – 2020
Figure 44: First Responder Subscriptions over Commercial LTE Networks in Asia Pacific (Thousands): 2011 – 2020
Figure 45: First Responder Data Device Shipments over Commercial LTE Networks in Asia Pacific (Thousands): 2011 – 2020
Figure 46: First Responder Data Device Shipment Revenue over Commercial LTE Networks in Asia Pacific ($ Million): 2011 – 2020
Figure 47: Public Safety Service Revenue over Commercial LTE Networks in Asia Pacific ($ Million): 2011 - 2020
Figure 48: Private (Public Safety) LTE eNodeB Shipments in Asia Pacific: 2011 – 2020
Figure 49: Private (Public Safety) LTE eNodeB Shipment Revenue in Asia Pacific ($ Million): 2011 – 2020
Figure 50: Private (Public Safety) LTE eNodeB Installed Base in Asia Pacific: 2011 - 2020
Figure 51: First Responder Subscriptions over Private Public Safety LTE Networks in North America (Thousands): 2011 – 2020
Figure 52: First Responder Data Device Shipments over Private Public Safety LTE Networks in North America (Thousands): 2011 – 2020
Figure 53: First Responder Data Device Shipment Revenue over Private LTE Public Safety LTE Networks in North America ($ Million): 2011 – 2020
Figure 54: Service Revenue over Private Public Safety LTE Networks in North America ($ Million): 2011 – 2020
Figure 55: First Responder Subscriptions over Commercial LTE Networks in North America (Thousands): 2011 – 2020
Figure 56: First Responder Data Device Shipments over Commercial LTE Networks in North America (Thousands): 2011 – 2020
Figure 57: First Responder Data Device Shipment Revenue over Commercial LTE Networks in North America ($ Million): 2011 – 2020
Figure 58: Public Safety Service Revenue over Commercial LTE Networks in North America ($ Million): 2011 - 2020
Figure 59: Private (Public Safety) LTE eNodeB Shipments in North America: 2011 – 2020
Figure 60: Private (Public Safety) LTE eNodeB Shipment Revenue in North America ($ Million): 2011 – 2020
Figure 61: Private (Public Safety) LTE eNodeB Installed Base in North America: 2011 - 2020
Figure 62: First Responder Subscriptions over Private Public Safety LTE Networks in Latin & Central America (Thousands): 2011 – 2020
Figure 63: First Responder Data Device Shipments over Private Public Safety LTE Networks in Latin & Central America (Thousands): 2011 – 2020
Figure 64: First Responder Data Device Shipment Revenue over Private LTE Public Safety LTE Networks in Latin & Central America ($ Million): 2011 – 2020
Figure 65: Service Revenue over Private Public Safety LTE Networks in Latin & Central America ($ Million): 2011 – 2020
Figure 66: First Responder Subscriptions over Commercial LTE Networks in Latin & Central America (Thousands): 2011 – 2020
Figure 67: First Responder Data Device Shipments over Commercial LTE Networks in Latin & Central America (Thousands): 2011 – 2020
Figure 68: First Responder Data Device Shipment Revenue over Commercial LTE Networks in Latin & Central America ($ Million): 2011 – 2020
Figure 69: Public Safety Service Revenue over Commercial LTE Networks in Latin & Central America ($ Million): 2011 - 2020
Figure 70: Private (Public Safety) LTE eNodeB Shipments in Latin & Central America: 2011 – 2020
Figure 71: Private (Public Safety) LTE eNodeB Shipment Revenue in Latin & Central America ($ Million): 2011 – 2020
Figure 72: Private (Public Safety) LTE eNodeB Installed Base in Latin & Central America: 2011 - 2020
Figure 73: First Responder Subscriptions over Private Public Safety LTE Networks in Middle East & Africa (Thousands): 2011 – 2020
Figure 74: First Responder Data Device Shipments over Private Public Safety LTE Networks in Middle East & Africa (Thousands): 2011 – 2020
Figure 75: First Responder Data Device Shipment Revenue over Private LTE Public Safety LTE Networks in Middle East & Africa ($ Million): 2011 – 2020
Figure 76: Service Revenue over Private Public Safety LTE Networks in Middle East & Africa ($ Million): 2011 – 2020
Figure 77: First Responder Subscriptions over Commercial LTE Networks in Middle East & Africa (Thousands): 2011 – 2020
Figure 78: First Responder Data Device Shipments over Commercial LTE Networks in Middle East & Africa (Thousands): 2011 – 2020
Figure 79: First Responder Data Device Shipment Revenue over Commercial LTE Networks in Middle East & Africa ($ Million): 2011 – 2020
Figure 80: Public Safety Service Revenue over Commercial LTE Networks in Middle East & Africa ($ Million): 2011 - 2020
Figure 81: Private (Public Safety) LTE eNodeB Shipments in Middle East & Africa: 2011 – 2020
Figure 82: Private (Public Safety) LTE eNodeB Shipment Revenue in Middle East & Africa ($ Million): 2011 – 2020
Figure 83: Private (Public Safety) LTE eNodeB Installed Base in Middle East & Africa: 2011 - 2020
Figure 84: First Responder Subscriptions over Private Public Safety LTE Networks in Eastern Europe (Thousands): 2011 – 2020
Figure 85: First Responder Data Device Shipments over Private Public Safety LTE Networks in Eastern Europe (Thousands): 2011 – 2020
Figure 86: First Responder Data Device Shipment Revenue over Private LTE Public Safety LTE Networks in Eastern Europe ($ Million): 2011 – 2020
Figure 87: Service Revenue over Private Public Safety LTE Networks in Eastern Europe ($ Million): 2011 – 2020
Figure 88: First Responder Subscriptions over Commercial LTE Networks in Eastern Europe (Thousands): 2011 – 2020
Figure 89: First Responder Data Device Shipments over Commercial LTE Networks in Eastern Europe (Thousands): 2011 – 2020
Figure 90: First Responder Data Device Shipment Revenue over Commercial LTE Networks in Eastern Europe ($ Million): 2011 – 2020
Figure 91: Public Safety Service Revenue over Commercial LTE Networks in Eastern Europe ($ Million): 2011 - 2020
Figure 92: Private (Public Safety) LTE eNodeB Shipments in Eastern Europe: 2011 – 2020
Figure 93: Private (Public Safety) LTE eNodeB Shipment Revenue in Eastern Europe ($ Million): 2011 – 2020
Figure 94: Private (Public Safety) LTE eNodeB Installed Base in Eastern Europe: 2011 - 2020
Figure 95: First Responder Subscriptions over Private Public Safety LTE Networks in Western Europe (Thousands): 2011 – 2020
Figure 96: First Responder Data Device Shipments over Private Public Safety LTE Networks in Western Europe (Thousands): 2011 – 2020
Figure 97: First Responder Data Device Shipment Revenue over Private LTE Public Safety LTE Networks in Western Europe ($ Million): 2011 – 2020
Figure 98: Service Revenue over Private Public Safety LTE Networks in Western Europe ($ Million): 2011 – 2020
Figure 99: First Responder Subscriptions over Commercial LTE Networks in Western Europe (Thousands): 2011 – 2020
Figure 100: First Responder Data Device Shipments over Commercial LTE Networks in Western Europe (Thousands): 2011 – 2020
Figure 101: First Responder Data Device Shipment Revenue over Commercial LTE Networks in Western Europe ($ Million): 2011 – 2020
Figure 102: Public Safety Service Revenue over Commercial LTE Networks in Western Europe ($ Million): 2011 - 2020
Figure 103: Private (Public Safety) LTE eNodeB Shipments in Western Europe: 2011 – 2020
Figure 104: Private (Public Safety) LTE eNodeB Shipment Revenue in Western Europe ($ Million): 2011 – 2020
Figure 105: Private (Public Safety) LTE eNodeB Installed Base in Western Europe: 2011 - 2020
Figure 106: LTE Proximity Service (ProSe) Examples
Figure 107: Global Private (Public Safety) and Commercial LTE EPC/Mobile Core Revenues Compared ($ Million): 2011 - 2020
Figure 108: Global Private (Public Safety) LTE Backhaul Investments ($ Million): 2011 - 2020
Figure 109: TCO Comparison for Private LTE vs. Public-Private Partnership
Figure 110: Global Private (Public Safety) LTE eNodeB Shipments by Cell Type: 2011 - 2020
Figure 111: Global Private (Public Safety) LTE eNodeB Installed Base by Cell Type: 2011 - 2020
Figure 112: Global Private (Public Safety) LTE Macrocell eNodeB Installed Base: 2011 - 2020
Figure 113: Global Private (Public Safety) LTE Small Cell eNodeB Installed Base: 2011 - 2020
Figure 114: Global Private (Public Safety) LTE Macrocell Relay eNodeB Installed Base: 2011 - 2020
Figure 115: Global Private (Public Safety) LTE eNodeB Installed Base: 2011 - 2020
Figure 116: Global Private (Public Safety) LTE Cell in a Box (CIAB) eNodeB Installed Base: 2011 - 2020
Figure 117: Global Private (Public Safety) LTE Airborne eNodeB Installed Base: 2011 - 2020

LIST OF COMPANIES

3GPP (THIRD GENERATION PARTNERSHIP PROJECT)
7 LAYERS AG
Abu Dhabi Police
ACMA (Australian Communications and Media Authority)
Aculab
Adax
ADCOM911 (Adams County Communication Center)
Aeroflex
Airbus Defence and Space (Formerly Cassidian)
Airbus Group
Airspan Networks
Airwave
Alcatel-Lucent
Amdocs
Anritsu
APCO (Association of Public-Safety Communications Officials-International)
Apple
ARASKOM
Aricent Group
Artevea
ASTRID
ASTRO Solutions
AT&T Mobility
ATIS (Alliance for Telecommunications Industry Solutions)
Atlas Telecom
Aviat Networks
Avtec
Axell Wireless
Axis Communications
BAE Systems
BASE (Belgium)
BayWEB (Bay Area Wireless Enhanced Broadband system)
BFDX
BlackBerry
Bosch Security Systems
Brazilian Army
Bridgewater
Broadcom
C4i
CalAmp
Canadian Advanced Technology Alliance
Catalyst Communications
CCTI (Catalyst Communications Technologies Inc)
China Mobile
Cimarron Technologies
Cisco
CITIG (Canadian Interoperability Technology Interest Group)
City of Charlotte
City of Fort Worth
City of Irving
City of New Orleans
City of Pembroke Pine
Cobham
CommScope
Covia Labs
DAMM Cellular Systems A/S
Daniels Electronics Ltd
DAPage Notifications
DataNet Software
Dubai Police
Dutch Police
EADS
Eastcom
EENA (European Emergency Number Association)
EF Johnson
Ericsson
ETELM
Etherstack
ETSI (European Telecommunications Standards Institute)
Eventide
EXACOM
Exalt Communications
Exelis
Facebook
FEMA (Federal Emergency Management Agency)
FCC (Federal Communications Commission)
FirstNet (First Responder Network Authority)
French Armed Forces
FREQUENTIS AG
General Dynamics
General Dynamics C4 Systems
German Armed Forces
Germany Army
Google
Harris
Harris County
HigherGround
Hitachi
Honeywell
Hong Kong Police Force
HQT Radio
HTC
Huawei
Hughes
Hytera
iCOM
ICOM America
Imtradex
Intel
InterDigital
InterSec
Intrado
IPWireless
ITT Corporation
ITU (International Telecommunications Union)
Japan Radio Company
JDI (JING DENG INDUSTRIAL)
Jordanian Armed Forces
JVC Kenwood
Kapsch CarrierCom
Kelrad Software
Kenwood
Kirisun
Kodiak Networks
KPN
L-3 Communications
LA-RICS (Los Angeles Regional Interoperable Communications System)
Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department
Lemko
Lenovo
LG Electronics
LG Uplus
LiveViewGPS
Lockheed Martin
Mentura Group
MetroPCS
Miami Dade Police Department
Miami-Dade County
Ministry of Communications, Libya
Ministry of Public Security (MPS), China
Mobistar
MODUCOM
Moscow Police
Motorola Mobility (Part of Lenovo)
Motorola Solutions
Mutualink
National Rail (UK)
NATO (North Atlantic Treaty Organization)
NEC
Net4Mobility
NetMotion Wireless
Nevada Department of Transportation
New York Police Department
New Zealand Police
NextNav
NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology)
Nokia
Nokia Solutions & Networks (NSN)
Northrop Grumman
NPSTC (National Public Safety Telecommunications Council)
nTerop
NTIA (National Telecommunications and Information Administration)
NVA (Networked Vehicle Association)
NYCWiN (New York City Wireless Network)
Oceus Networks
OMA (Open Mobile Alliance)
Oman Royal Office
Ontario Ministry of Transportation
ONTHEGODEVICES LLC
OpenSignal
Panasonic
Panorama Antennas
Phonak
Piciorgros (Funk-Electronic Piciorgros GmbH)
Pikewerks Corporation
Polaris
Police Federation of Australia
Portalify
POTEVIO International
PowerTrunk
Proximus
PSCR (Public Safety Communications Research)
Putian
Puxing Radio
Pyramid Communications
Qatar Armed Forces
Qatar MOI (Ministry of Interior)
Qualcomm
RACOM
Radio IP
Radisys
RAVEN Electronics Corporation
Raytheon
Reality Mobile
RELM Wireless
Réseau Ferré de France (RFF)
Rivada Networks
Rohde & Schwarz
Rohill
Royal Canadian Mounted Police
SAIC (Science Applications International Corporation)
Samsung
SANG (Saudi Arabian National Guard)
Sao Paulo Military Police
Sapura Secured Technologies
SaskTel
Saudi MOI (Ministry of Interior)
Savox Communications
Selex ES
Sepura
SETAR
Shanghai Police
Siemens
Signalion
Simoco
SiRRAN
SK Telecom
SmithMicro
Sonic Communications
Sony
Space Data
Star Solutions
State of Louisiana
State of Mississippi
State of New Jersey
State of New Mexico
State of Oklahoma
Stop Noise
SyTech Corporation
Tait
TCCA (TETRA and Critical Communications Association)
TCS (TeleCommunication Systems)
TD Industry Alliance(TDIA)
Techosonic Industries
Tecore Networks
Telenet
Televate, LLC
TELEX
Teltronic
Telum
TETRAtab
Texas Instruments
Thales
The Genesis Group
TIA (Telecommunications Industry Association)
TITAN Communication Systems
T-Mobile
Toshiba
Trident Microsystems
Turkish National Police Force
Twisted Pair Solutions
U.K. Home Office
U.S. Army
U.S. Cellular
U.S. Coast Guard
U.S. Department of Commerce
U.S. Department of Defense
U.S. Department of Homeland Security
U.S. Navy
U.S. Special Operations Command (SOCOM)
UIC (International Union of Railways)
UNIMO Technology
University of Ottawa
USPTO (U.S. Patent and Trademark Office)
Utility
Verizon Wireless
Vidyo
Vodafone
Voice Print International
West Australian Police
Zetron
Zhengzhou Metro
ZTE

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The Public Safety LTE & Mobile Broadband Market: 2014 - 2020
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