The SDN, NFV & Network Virtualization Bible Datasheet: 2014 - 2020

Date: October 1, 2013
Pages: N/A
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US$ 1,000.00
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Publisher: Signals and Systems Telecom
Report type: Strategic Report
Delivery: E-mail Delivery (PDF)
ID: SC1D821747BEN
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The SDN, NFV & Network Virtualization Bible Datasheet: 2014 - 2020
Part of the “SDN, NFV & Network Virtualization Bible: 2014 – 2020”, this datasheet provides in-depth revenue forecasts on the Software Defined Networking (SDN), Network Functions Virtualization (NFV) and generic network virtualization market.

Market forecasts and historical revenue figures from 2010 till 2020 are provided for each of the following submarkets, use base and use case categories:
  • Submarkets
    • SDN Software & Hardware
    • Non-NFV Network Virtualization Software
    • NFV Software SDN Submarkets
    • SDN Controller Hardware Appliances
    • SDN Controller Software
  • User Base Categories
    • Service Providers
    • Data Centers & Enterprises
  • Service Provider Use Case Categories
    • Radio Access Networks
    • Mobile Core, EPC, IMS & Services
    • OSS/BSS
    • Data Center
    • Mobile Backhaul
    • Wireline Fixed Access Networks
    • CPE/Home Environment
The following regional and country markets are also covered:
  • Regional Markets
    • Asia Pacific
    • Eastern Europe
    • Latin & Central America
    • Middle East & Africa
    • North America
    • Western Europe
  • Country Markets; Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Israel, Italy, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, Norway, Pakistan, Philippines, Poland, Qatar, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Taiwan, Thailand, UAE, UK and USA
Additional forecasts are provided for:
  • SDN and NFV Induced Service Provider CapEx Savings by Region
LIST OF COMPANIES MENTIONED

6connect
6WIND
A10 Networks
Accedian Networks
Accton
ActionPacked Networks
Active Broadband Networks
ADARA Networks
ADTRAN
ADVA Optical Networking
Advantech
AEPONYX
Affirmed Networks
Alcatel-Lucent
Algar Telecom
Alibaba
Allot Communications
Altaro
ALTEN Group
Altera Corporation
Alvarion
Amartus
Amazon
Amdocs
Anuta Networks
Apple
Argela
Aricent Group
Arista Networks
ARM Limited
Arnold Consulting
Aruba Networks
AT&T
aTAC Initiatives
Avaya
Beijing Internet Institute (BII)
Bell Canada
Benu Networks
Big Switch Networks
BII Group
Boundary
Broadcom
Brocade
Browan Communications
BSkyB
BT
BTI Systems
CableLabs
Calient Technologies
Calsoft Labs
Canonical
Cariden Technologies
Carmel Ventures
Cavium Networks
Celestica
Cellcom
Centec Networks
CenturyLink Corporation
Ceragon Networks
Cetan Corporation
Check Point Software Technologies
China Mobile
China Mobile (US Research Center)
China Mobile Research Institute (CMRI)
ChipStart
Ciena
CIMI Corporation
Cisco
Citrix
CloudFX
CloudNFV
Cloudscaling
CohesiveFT
Colt
Comcast
Connectem
ConteXtream
Contrail Systems
Coraid
Coriant
Corsa Technology
Cplane
Cumulus Networks
Cyan
Dell
Dell Force10
Delta Electronics
DESS GmbH and Co Consulting
Deutsche Telekom
Dialogic
DirecTV
Dorado Software
ECI Telecom
Ecode Networks
Edgenet
Edgewater Networks
Elbrys Networks
Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI)
Elisa Oyj
Embrane
EMC
Emerson Network Power
Emulex
Enterasys Networks
EnterpriseWeb
Equinix
Ericsson
EstiNet Technologies
European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI)
Extreme Networks
EZchip
F5 LineRate Systems
F5 Networks
Facebook
Fiberhome Technologies
Fidelity Investments
Firemon
Fishnet Security
Flanagan Consulting
Flash Networks
Fortinet
Fraunhofer FOKUS
Freescale
French Institute for Research in Computer Science (INRIA)
FTW - Telecommunications Research Centre Vienna
Fujitsu
GE Intelligent Platforms (GE Energy)
Gemtek Technologies
GENBAND
Gencore Systems
Gigamon
GigaSpaces Technologies
GlimmerGlass
Glue Networks
GoGrid
Goldman Sachs
Google
Guavus
Hewlett-Packard (HP)
Hitachi
HTC
Huawei
IBM
IBS Group
Indiana University
IneoQuest Technologies
Infinera
Infinetics
Infoblox
Inktank
Inocybe Technologies
Insieme Networks
Institute for Information Industry (III)
Intel
International Telecommunications Union (ITU)
Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF)
Internet Research Task Force (IRTF)
Interphase
Intune Networks
IP Infusion
Ipgallery
ISC8
Iskratel
Italtel
Ixia
Jara Networks
JDS Uniphase (JDSU)
JumpGen Systems
Juniper Networks
Kanazawa University Hospital
KDDI
KEMP Technologies
Kloudspun
Korea Telecom
Kulcloud
Kyocera
L3 Communication Systems – East
Lagrange Systems
Lancope
Lanner
Lanscope
Layer123
Level 3 Communications
LG Electronics
Locaweb
LSI Corporation
Lumeta
Luxoft
Lyatiss
M2Mi
Mainline Information Systems
Marist College
Marvell
Mavenir
MeadowCom
MediaTek
Mellanox Technologies
Mentor Graphics
Metaswitch Networks
MetraTech
Microsoft
Midokura
Mirantis
MKI USA
Mojatatu Networks
MontaVista
Motorola
Motorola Solutions
MRV Communications
Nari Networks
Narinet
NCL Communication (NCLC)
Nebula
NEC
Nephos6
Net Optics
NetApp
NetCracker Technology
NetFlow Logic
Netgear
NetNumber
Netronome
NetScout Systems
Netsocket
NetStructures
NetYCE
NICE
Nicira
Nippon Express
Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation
Nissho Electronics
Nokia Solutions & Networks (NSN)
Nominum
NoviFlow
NTT Communications
NTT Data
NTT DoCoMo
Nuage Networks
Nutanix
Object Management Group (OMG)
ON.Lab
One Convergence
Open Networking Foundation (ONF)
Open Networking Research Center (ONRC)
Open Virtualization Alliance (OVA)
OpenDaylight (Linux Foundation)
Openet
OpenStack Foundation
Openwave Mobility
Opera Software
Opscode
Optelian
Optus
Oracle
Orange
Orchestral Networks
Orient Logic
Overture Networks
PacketFront Software
Pantheon
Paxterra Solutions
PeakColo
PeerApp
Pertino
Phillips Technology Solutions
Pica8
Pivotal
Plexxi
PLUMgrid
Pluribus Networks
PLVision
PMC Sierra
Polatis
Portugal Telecom (PT) /Oi
Poznan Supercomputing and Network Centre
Procera Networks
Qosmos
Qualcomm
Quanta
Rabobank
Rackspace
RAD Data Communications Ltd
RadiSys
Radware
Real Status
Red Bend Software
Red Hat
RightScale
Riverbed Technology
Rogers Communications
RuahTao
Saisei Networks
Samsung
Sanctum Networks
Sandvine
Scalr
SCLID Innovations
SDNSquare
ServiceMesh
Seven Principles
SevOne
Sharp
Silver Peak
SingTel
SK Telecom
Skyfire
Snabb
SoftBank
Solarflare Communications
SolarWinds
SolidFire
Sonus Networks
Spirent
Splunk
Sprint Communications
StackIQ
Stanford University
Stateless Networks
Stork Lab
Stratosphere
Sunbay
Super Micro
Swisscom
Symantec
SYS Software
Tail-f Systems
Tallac Networks
Tata Consultancy Services
Tech Mahindra
Tekelec
Tektronix
Telchemy
Telco Systems
Telecom Italia
Telefónica
Telekom Austria
TeliaSonera
Tellabs
Telstra
Telus
Tencent
Tervela
Texas Instruments (TI)
Thales
Tieto
Tilera
TM Forum
T-Mobile
TorreyPoint
Transmode
Travelping GmbH
Tucana
Turk Telekom
TW Telecom
Ubicity Corporation
UBIqube Solutions
United Nations
University of California, Berkeley
UPRC
vArmour Networks
Vello Systems
Verisign
Verizon
Verizon Wireless
Versa Networks
Veryx Technologies
Virtela
Virtual Open Systems
VirtualLogix
Visionael Corporation
Vmware
Vodafone
VSS Monitoring
Vyatta
Websense
Wind River
Windstream Communications
Wiretap
WVNET
xFlow Research
XIUS
Xpliant
Xsigo
Yahoo
Yokogawa
Zhone Technologies
ZTE Corporation

SNS Research's latest datasheet indicates that wireless service providers will spend as much as $415 Million on virtualizing their mobile core, EPC and IMS infrastructure in 2014 alone.

While the benefits of Software Defined Networking (SDN) and network virtualization are well known in the enterprise IT and data center world, both technologies also bring a hosts of benefits to the telecommunications service provider/carrier community.

Not only can SDN and network virtualization help address the explosive capacity demand of mobile traffic, but they can also reduce the CapEx and OpEx burden faced by service providers to handle this demand by diminishing reliance on expensive proprietary hardware platforms.

SDN and network virtualization solutions have been widely deployed in data center and enterprise environments, and many service provider deployments are already underway. 

Network Functions Virtualization (NFV) is service provider led initiative aimed at virtualizing network components in a service provider network.  While NFV is still a developing technology with its first set of specifications published in October 2013, many vendors have already developed commercial-grade solutions that align well with the NFV initiative.

Driven by the thriving ecosystem, SNS Research estimates that SDN and NFV investments on mobile core, EPC and IMS infrastructure will account for $415 Million in 2014 alone.

The material was prepared in November, 2013.

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The SDN, NFV & Network Virtualization Bible Datasheet: 2014 - 2020
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