RFID in Airports and Airlines 2008-2018

Date: June 23, 2008
Pages: 217
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US$ 2,895.00
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Publisher: IDTechEx Ltd
Report type: Strategic Report
Delivery: E-mail Delivery (PDF), Hard Copy Mail Delivery
ID: RE747F315BBEN
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RFID in Airports and Airlines 2008-2018
This is the first in-depth research into the rapid increase in use of RFID in the air industry.

Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) is an extremely powerful enabling technology in airports and aircraft, serving to improve security against criminal attack, safety against general hazards, efficiency, error prevention and data capture and to remove tedious tasks. It can even create new earning streams where it makes tolling feasible without causing congestion and where new airport 'touch and go' cards offer new paid services without delays. RFID creates competitive advantage in many ways and in many locations. Managers in the air industry and their suppliers are in danger of being left behind if they are ignorant of the successes and new possibilities of using RFID to improve the air industry. This unique report therefore looks at the broad sweep of work in this area, and gives market sizes, paybacks and forecasts. In particular, we assess the following applications:
  • Airline baggage tagging
  • Reduced wastage in food trolleys
  • Cargo tracking: improving operations
  • Parts
  • Freight: enabling the IAT e-freight initiative

The potential amount that RFID baggage tagging can save amounts to $760 million a year and is therefore worthwhile tackling. In some cases the saving has been very high - in Hong Kong airport, for example, the average cost of handling bags has gone from $7 per bag to $4 - a huge saving. By early 2008, more than 30 airports are using/trialling RFID for baggage handling. The major roll-out at Hong Kong is beginning to be done elsewhere - including now at Milan airport.

Paybacks from RFID in the air industry are typically in the satisfactory 1-2 years range but some paybacks of only months have been reported particularly where new earning streams are created. RFID has been most lucrative when it has been used to change the way of doing business.

Market forecasts

The spend on RFID systems, including tags, exclusively for the air industry (ie omitting passports, visas, general credit and debit cards etc) is included in this report. There is considerable upside potential in these forecasts depending on progress in countries such as China. The forecasts see early rapid growth of baggage tagging which then becomes commoditised at the tag level in 5-10 years, compensation coming from rapid growth of other substantial applications in the later years.

For example, in the later years, up to $60 million may be spent yearly on sophisticated RFID tags for aircraft parts and equipment, with the associated infrastructure and services being a larger figure. The numbers, unit prices and value of the RFID baggage tags alone from 2008-2018 are also given in the report.

The number of RFID baggage tags delivered in 2007 was about 25 million at an average price of 20 cents. In 2004 only a few tens of thousands were used and only in trials. The main airports taking these deliveries were Las Vegas, Hong Kong and Milan but there was major trial or rollout activity at Atlanta, Denver, Los Angeles, Narita Japan and several Korean airports as well.
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY AND CONCLUSION

1. INTRODUCTION

  1.1.1. Airports today
  1.1.2. Many challenges
1.2. What is RFID?
  1.2.1. RFID is in many parts of the modern airport already
  1.2.2. Everyday RFID - car clickers, contactless cards
1.3. Airport challenges and RFID solutions
1.4. Why RFID is pervading airports

2. LEARNING FROM OTHER INDUSTRIES THAT ARE AHEAD IN CERTAIN RESPECTS

2.1. Retailing
2.2. Postal and courier services
2.3. Military
2.4. Healthcare
2.5. Transport

3. RELEVANT NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN RFID

3.1. EPC and the Internet of Things
3.2. Cleverer tags
  3.2.1. Ultra small tags from Thailand, Malaysia and Japan
  3.2.2. UHF tags with advanced antennas
  3.2.3. HF tags are most popular and are no longer limited to one meter range
  3.2.4. Printed RFID
3.3. Cleverer infrastructure and software
  3.3.1. Multiprotocol, multifrequency intelligent interrogators
  3.3.2. RFID with or on GSM, WiFi, Bluetooth, GPS, DSRC, UWB, Zigbee
3.4. Cost reduction of tags and infrastructure
  3.4.1. Tags
  3.4.2. Infrastructure, software and support
  3.4.3. RFID and Real Time Location Systems (RTLS)

4. RECENT ANNOUNCEMENTS OF NEW CAPABILITY AND INITIATIVES

4.1. Passenger processing - cards instead of tickets?
4.2. Baggage handling and the Simplifying the Business program
4.3. European Aviation Safety Agency
4.4. Border crossing
4.5. Ubiquitous Sensor Networks - developments in Korea, Japan and USA
4.6. E-passports and visas
  4.6.1. Privacy concerns and delays resulting
  4.6.2. Benefits of e-passports to airports
  4.6.3. Airlines are a weak link
  4.6.4. Simplifying travel
  4.6.5. Orders placed
  4.6.6. Interesting questions for the future
4.7. Integrity of RFID security in cards, passports, visas
  4.7.1. Security of RFID smart cards - the general debate
  4.7.2. Encryption
  4.7.3. At least as secure as contact cards
  4.7.4. Fewer ways in for the criminal
  4.7.5. Invasive attacks a concern
  4.7.6. Opinion of Cryptography Research
  4.7.7. Minority opinions
4.8. Holistic view of airports needed

5. CASE STUDIES OF RFID IN AIRPORTS

5.1. Baggage
  5.1.1. Las Vegas McCarran International Airport, baggage, USA
  5.1.2. Malpensa Airport, baggage, Italy
  5.1.3. Seattle Airport SeaTac Terminal, baggage USA
  5.1.4. Asiana Airlines, baggage tracking and monitoring, Korea
  5.1.5. Auto-ID Laboratory air baggage Hong Kong/ US
  5.1.6. KLM and Air France, baggage, The Netherlands, France, Japan
  5.1.7. Delta Airlines/Jacksonville Airport Authority baggage, USA
  5.1.8. Heathrow International Airport baggage collection, UK
  5.1.9. Helsinki Vantaa International Airport, baggage, Finland
  5.1.10. Hong Kong International Airport, baggage tracking, China
  5.1.11. KLM Airline, baggage, The Netherlands
  5.1.12. Korea Airports Corporation, Incheon, Gimpo and Haneda Airports baggage tracking, Korea
  5.1.13. Lan Chile Airlines, baggage, Chile
  5.1.14. Savarnabhumi Airport, baggage, Thailand
  5.1.15. Singapore Airlines baggage, Singapore
  5.1.16. Narita Airport, baggage tags HF, Japan
  5.1.17. Narita International Airport, Tokyo Japan, air baggage, UHF, Japan
  5.1.18. San Francisco International Airport, baggage USA
5.2. Vehicles and trailers - buses, taxis, cars, GSE etc
  5.2.1. Vantaa Airport taxis, Finland
  5.2.2. BAA, taxis at Heathrow International Airport Steria System, UK
  5.2.3. BAA taxis at Heathrow International Airport, original TransCore system UK
  5.2.4. Charles de Gaulle Airport taxis, original system France
  5.2.5. Arlanda Airport, employee vehicle parking, Sweden
  5.2.6. Dallas Fort Worth Airport International Highway vehicle tolling, USA
  5.2.7. Dallas Fort Worth Airport vehicle tolling USA
  5.2.8. Delta Airlines, GSE vehicles, USA
  5.2.9. Heathrow Airport, GSE vehicle access control, UK
  5.2.10. John Wayne Airport, ground traffic USA
  5.2.11. Los Angeles and Orange County Airports road tolling, USA
  5.2.12. Newark Liberty International Airport, Vehicles, USA
  5.2.13. Zurich International Airport baggage wagons, Switzerland
  5.2.14. Vienna International Airport GSE vehicles, Austria
5.3. Conveyances - ULDs, trolleys etc
  5.3.1. Hong Kong International Airport, food trolley hangers, China
  5.3.2. Sepang Airport, food trolleys, Malaysia
  5.3.3. KLM food trolleys, Holland
  5.3.4. Air Canada, tracking trolleys, Canada
  5.3.5. Envirotainer air cargo, Europe
  5.3.6. Arlanda Airport baggage pallets, Sweden
  5.3.7. TNT Express, air containers, Europe
  5.3.8. Dubai International Airport, luggage trolleys, Dubai
5.4. Cards, tickets, badges, assets
  5.4.1. Boise Air Terminal/Gowen Field Airport, access control, USA
  5.4.2. Finnair check-in card, Finland
  5.4.3. Frankfurt International Airport, assets requiring maintenance, Germany
  5.4.4. IATA Airlines, E- ticketing project, worldwide
  5.4.5. Lubbock Preston Smith International Airport parking card, USA
  5.4.6. Lufthansa frequent flyer card, Germany
  5.4.7. Manchester International Airport, people, UK
  5.4.8. Newark Liberty International Airport, Trusted Travellers' card, USA
  5.4.9. Schonefeld, Tegel and Templehof Airports card access, Germany
  5.4.10. Southwest Florida International Airport, access cards, USA
  5.4.11. Swissair/Sabena loyalty card, Switzerland, Belgium
5.5. Aircraft parts and tools
  5.5.1. Airbus A380 parts, Europe
  5.5.2. Airbus, aircraft parts in general, USA
  5.5.3. Boeing, aircraft parts, item level, USA
  5.5.4. Boeing, Real Time Locating System (RTLS), item level, USA
  5.5.5. Delta Airlines, aircraft parts - item level, USA
  5.5.6. FedEx, aircraft parts - item level, USA

6. MARKET FORECASTS 2008 2018

APPENDIX 1: FURTHER READING FROM IDTECHEX

APPENDIX 2: INTRODUCTION TO RFID

APPENDIX 3: EPCGLOBAL AND THE INTERNET OF THINGS

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