Disruptive Technology in the Enterprise: Future trends, impact and vulnerabilities to substitution

Date: October 1, 2009
Pages: 165
Price:
US$ 2,875.00
Publisher: Business Insights
Report type: Strategic Report
Delivery: E-mail Delivery (PDF)
ID: D74CD65C1E7EN
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Disruptive Technology in the Enterprise: Future trends, impact and vulnerabilities to substitution
During unfavourable economic conditions, technological innovation is one of the first investments to suffer. However, as history has shown, ignoring technological innovation and development can leave organisations, and indeed entire industries, vulnerable to disruption from new technologies. This report explains what disurption is, what causes it, and how organisations can avoid it.
The motor car, mobile phones, personal computers, and so on, are all examples of disruptive technologies. There are numerous examples throughout modern business history of disruptive technologies appearing, apparently from nowhere, to threaten and ultimately displace existing technologies and the industries and vendors that grew up around them - such as the mainframe industry, communications and storage.

But disruption is rarely a consequence of technology innovation alone, rather a reflection of how existing organizations and markets deal with it. While disruptive innovation can be seen as a threat, it is also an opportunity, and indeed a necessity in the rapidly evolving world of IT and business technology.
Modern history suggests that accurate prediction of disruptive technologies is challenging, however a look at past examples can reveal important characteristics and similarities between disruptive technologies. This report aims to provide insight into the patterns and characteristics of potentially disruptive technologies and innovation trends, and provide ways of assessing vulnerability to disruption. As a result, organizations can use this insight to understood how best to avoid the threat of disruption.

Key Features of this report
  • A survey of CIOs in a variety of vertical industries and geographies provides insight into how innovation is managed, and where there is current vulnerability to disruption.
  • A proprietary assessment model for gaining insight into how successful a potentially disruptive technology could be.
  • Offers an assessment model for understanding and avoiding vulnerability to disruptive technologies.
  • CIO survey reveals where there is most demand for improvements in technology performance and efficiency.
  • Analysis of 4 new technologies showing which technologies could be potentially disruptive.

Scope of this report

a) Gain insight into where there are current vulnerabilities to technological disruption.
b) Understand how to identify and characterise potentially disruptive technologies.
c) Find out where CIOs believe there is the greatest need for technological improvement.
d) Gain access to a disruption assessment model, which provides a method for assessing vulnerability to disruption.
e) Understand which industries and organisations are potentially vulnerable to technological disruption.

Key findings from this report

Disruptions not only displace technologies, they also fundamentally shift the balance of power in entire industries and, often, spell the end for established market leading vendors.

There is nothing disruptive per se about any new technology; rather disruption comes from the manner in which the industry leaders and players manage it.

The drivers and inhibitors of disruption can be broadly divided into two factors: customer need (driver), such as greater performance, lower cost, scalability, portability etc. and; barriers to entry (inhibitor), which can include unproven ROI, lack of knowledge, cost of switchover, and so on.

Cloud computing is very likely to become a ubiquitous computing model once the challenges are dealt with, and once the issue of trust is overcome.

Virtualization’s promise of significantly reduced energy consumption costs and hardware estate costs, combined with the IT and business agility benefits it offers, and relative ease and cost of integration and deployment means that it is very likely to see massive uptake, and become an ubiquitous technology within 10 years.

Key questions answered

a) What characteristics are common to disruptive technologies?
b) How can organizations assess their vulnerability to disruption?
c) Will open source communication devices threaten the incumbent market leaders for mobile application development?
d) What impact will the adoption of cloud computing as an ubiquitous IT delivery system have on existing market leaders?
e) Will NAND Flash memory replace DRAM and disk in the data center?

Disruptive Technology in the Enterprise
Executive summary
Strategies for assessing disruptive technology
NAND Flash storage
Infrastructure virtualization
Cloud computing
Open source communications devices

CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION AND SCOPE OF THE REPORT

Introduction
Who is this report for?
Research methodology
Definitions
Disruptive technology
NAND Flash storage
Infrastructure virtualization
Cloud computing
Open source communications devices

CHAPTER 2 STRATEGIES FOR ASSESSING DISRUPTIVE TECHNOLOGY

Summary
Introduction
What is a disruptive technology?
Examples of disruptive technologies
Defining disruptive patterns
The Innovator’s Dilemma
The evolution of a disruptive technology
Characteristics of a disruptive technology
Drivers and inhibitors of disruption
Economic, regulatory and social factors
Intrinsic and extrinsic factors
Innovation and business value
Types of innovation
Business value through disruption
Strategies for predicting disruption
Impact versus adoption
Peripheral, non-disruptive innovation
Immature disruptive innovation
Maturing disruptive technology
Core, non-disruptive innovation
Disruption assessment model
1. Impact
2. Adoption
Assessing the current potential for disruption
Conclusions

CHAPTER 3 NAND FLASH STORAGE

Summary
Introduction
Why is it potentially disruptive?
Market context
Market opportunity
Portable devices
Data center
Drivers and inhibitors
Drivers
Inhibitors
Vendor landscape
Impact versus adoption assessment
Impact
Adoption
Impact versus adoption assessment chart
Conclusions

CHAPTER 4 INFRASTRUCTURE VIRTUALIZATION

Summary
Introduction
Why virtualization is potentially disruptive
Market context
Market opportunity
Market drivers
Carbon footprint
Overcapacity and IT consolidation
IT agility
IT management and staff costs
Business continuity and agility
Inhibitors
Operational and business barriers
Automation and management challenges
Lack of interoperability
Challenges in maximizing benefits
Vendor landscape
Open source versus proprietary
VMware
Microsoft
XenSource
Citrix
Impact versus adoption assessment
Impact
Adoption
Impact versus adoption assessment chart
Conclusions

CHAPTER 5 CLOUD COMPUTING

Summary
Introduction
Why is it potentially disruptive?
Market context
Market opportunity
Market drivers
Services-based approach to IT
‘Elasticity’
Variable costs and usage-based models
Driving down costs in enterprise IT
New IT economies
Inhibitors
Lack of trust
Service adoption and management challenges
Matching optimal delivery models
Formulating the business case
Procurement processes
Migration challenges
Vendor landscape
Hardware vendors
Portable devices
Cloud infrastructure services providers
Cloud platforms
SaaS-backed platforms
Stack platforms
Stand-alone platforms
SaaS applications developers
Impact versus adoption assessment
Impact
Adoption
Impact versus adoption assessment chart
Conclusions

CHAPTER 6 OPEN SOURCE COMMUNICATIONS DEVICES

Summary
Introduction
Why is it potentially disruptive?
Market context
Market opportunity
Market drivers
Market inhibitors
Vendor landscape
Impact versus adoption assessment
Impact
Adoption
Impact versus adoption assessment chart
Conclusions

CHAPTER 7 INDEX

LIST OF FIGURES

Figure 2.1: The evolution of a disruptive technology
Figure 2.2: Interaction of intrinsic and extrinsic factors for disruption
Figure 2.3: Disruptive technology and business value
Figure 2.4: Business value applied to current innovations
Figure 2.5: Impact versus adoption – the progression of disruptive innovation
Figure 2.6: Areas of business value important to organizations – CIO respondent average ratings
Figure 2.7: The impact of innovations on enterprises in the next three years – CIO respondent average ratings
Figure 2.8: Business areas where there is most room for improvement? (% CIO respondents)
Figure 2.9: Technologies that have most transformed organizations in the last two years – CIO respondent average ratings
Figure 2.10: How organizations monitor upcoming technologies – CIO respondent average ratings
Figure 2.11: Does your organization have a future technology roadmap in place? (% CIO respondents)
Figure 2.12: How organizations test upcoming / innovative technologies before purchase - % CIO respondents
Figure 3.13: NAND Flash impact score summary
Figure 3.14: NAND Flash adoption score summary
Figure 3.15: Impact versus adoption final assessment chart – NAND flash storage
Figure 4.16: Data center overcapacity
Figure 4.17: The most pressing needs for improvement in the IT department - % CIO respondents
Figure 4.18: Infrastructure virtualization impact score summary
Figure 4.19: Infrastructure virtualization adoption score summary
Figure 4.20: Impact versus adoption final assessment chart – infrastructure virtualization
Figure 5.21: Cloud computing overlaps with other technology terms and trends
Figure 5.22: Cloud computing as an IT consumption model
Figure 5.23: Cloud computing – the competitive landscape
Figure 5.24: The gap between IT capacity and IT demand
Figure 5.25: Cloud computing impact score summary
Figure 5.26: Cloud computing adoption score summary
Figure 5.27: Impact versus adoption final assessment chart – cloud computing
Figure 6.28: Global smartphone annual shipments (000s), 2008-2014
Figure 6.29: Open source communications devices impact score summary
Figure 6.30: Open source communications adoption score summary
Figure 6.31: Impact versus adoption final assessment chart – open source communication devices

LIST OF TABLES

Table 2.1: Examples of disruptive technologies
Table 2.2: Characteristics of an early-stage disruptive technology
Table 2.3: Example of drivers and inhibitors of disruption
Table 2.4: Intrinsic and extrinsic factors for disruptive technologies
Table 2.5: Different types of innovation
Table 2.6: Criteria for measuring disruptiveness of innovations
Table 2.7: Business Insights survey results – where is there most room for improvement in business areas? (% CIO respondents)
Table 4.8: Cost savings possible through server consolidation
Table 6.9: Global smartphone annual shipments by OS (000s), 2008-2014

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Disruptive Technology in the Enterprise: Future trends, impact and vulnerabilities to substitution
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