Mass Spectrometry 2013: A Focus on Sales Growth

Date: February 4, 2013
Pages: 262
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Publisher: Biopharm Reports
Report type: Strategic Report
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Mass Spectrometry 2013: A Focus on Sales Growth
Summary: This market analysis was carried out to provide business information to developers, manufacturers and suppliers in the mass spectrometry field. Its findings include:
  • Marketing and sales opportunities
  • End-user purchasing decisions
  • Market growth and shrinkage
  • Innovation and new product opportunities
This study was conducted through specialist groups of experienced mass spectrometry end-users and its findings are therefore based on 'real world' market data.

Market Analysis and Opportunities

A competitive market analysis of current practices and future developments across 25 key market areas in the mass spectrometry field. Examples include:
  • MS Techniques: Which MS techniques are the market leaders and what changes do end-users predict over the next three years. Which techniques are growing and which are reducing?
  • MS Applications: What are the dominant applications in the MS field, and what changes do end-users anticipate over the next three years? Which applications are seeing growth and which are declining?
  • Suppliers: Who are the major company suppliers in the MS field and who do MS end-users plan to purchase from over the next three years. Who are the top ten suppliers in this field, and what changes are predicted in three years from now.
  • Opportunities: The findings of this study are analysed to identify opportunities to suppliers in the MS field, in the 'Market Areas' indicated below.
Overview

Mass Spectrometry 2013 presents the findings of a global market study of mass spectrometry, involving the participation of 567 experienced end-users in this field. With a focus on sales growth, market development and commercial opportunities, this study profiled current and evolving areas of this market, as outlined below. Its findings provide valuable product and market information, and decision-making support to suppliers in the mass spectrometry field.

Market Areas

Participants: Name, organisation, department, job title, and country

Organisation type: Large international companies, research institutes, small and medium sized companies, universities or other.

Current mass spectrometer companies: The use of mass spectrometers purchased from 32 specified mass spectrometer companies.

Current ionisation methods: The use of 18 specified ionisation methods in mass spectrometry, namely atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation (APCI), atmospheric pressure photoionisation (APPI), chemical ionisation (CI), desorption chemical ionisation (DCI), desorption/ionisation on silicon (DIOS), direct analysis in real time (DART), electron ionisation (EI), electrospray ionisation (ESI), fast atom bombardment (FAB), field desorption (FD), field ionisation (FI), glow discharge (GD), inductively coupled plasma (ICP), ion attachment ionisation (IAI), matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation (MALDI), negative ion electron capture (NIEC), thermal ionisation (TI), thermospray or other (more than 30 ionisation methods were identified in this market study).

Current ion analysers: The use of 12 specified ion analysers in mass spectrometry, namely orbitrap, quadrupole mass filter (QMF), sector, linear quadrupole ion trap, 3D quadrupole ion trap, time of flight (TOF), TOFIMS, differential mobility analyzer (DMA), differential mobility spectrometer (DMS), fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS), ion-mobility mass spectrometry (IMS) and other (more than 30 ion analysers were identified in this market study).

Current data systems: Current use of integrated data systems (supplied with the MS systems purchased) or alternatively, independent data systems, in mass spectrometry.

Current databases: Current use of database software in mass spectrometry.

Current specialist software: Current use of other specialist software in mass spectrometry.

Current configurations: Current use of 18 specified configurations (e.g. LC MS/MS) in mass spectrometry, namely accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), capillary electrophoresis mass spectrometry (EC-MS), gas chromatography MS (GC-MS), gas chromatography tandem MS (GC-MS/MS),GC-IMS, glow discharge mass spectrometry (GD-MS),inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS),ion mobility spectrometry mass spectrometry (IMS/MS),isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS),liquid chromatography ion mobility spectrometry mass spectrometry (LC-IMS),liquid chromatography ion mobility spectrometry mass spectrometry/MS (LC-IMS/MS),liquid chromatography MS (LC-MS),liquid chromatography tandem MS (LC-MS/MS),spark source mass spectrometry (SSMS), stand-alone MS (MS), supercritical fluid chromatography MS (SFC-MS), tandem MS (MS/MS), thermal ionization-mass spectrometry (TIMS) and other (more than 100 MS configurations were identified in this market study).

Current fragmentation methods: Current use of 7 specified fragmentation methods (e.g. ECD) in mass spectrometry, namely blackbody infrared radiative dissociation (BIRD), collision-induced dissociation (CID), electron capture dissociation (ECD), electron transfer dissociation (ETD), electron-detachment dissociation (EDD), infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD), surface-induced dissociation (SID) and other (more than 20 fragmentation methods were identified in this market study).

Molecules analysed. Current analysis of 10 different molecule classes, namely, small molecules, polypeptides (proteins), polynucleotides (e.g. DNA), amino Acids, nucleotides, lipids, oils, carbohydrates, synthetic molecules, natural Molecules and other.

Fields: biotechnology, chemicals, clinical, defence, energy, environmental, food and drink, forensics, geology, healthcare, natural products, pharmaceuticals, security, university/institute and other.

Purpose: Purposes or reasons for using mass spectrometry across the 14 fields previously indicated. As the purposes or reasons differ with field, each was considered individually and presented to appropriate study participants. As an example, the potential reasons for using mass spectrometry in the clinical area were biomarkers, clinical trials, proteomics, cytogenetics, cytopathology, physiology, diagnostics, drug ADME, drug monitoring, endocrinology, enzymology, genetics, haematology, histology, histopathology, immunology, pathology, pathophysiology, toxicology and other [please contact Biopharm Reports if you require the full (14) industry-specific listings].

Samples: The analysis of different sample types by mass spectrometry across 14 fields previously indicated. As study samples differ with field, each was considered individually and presented to appropriate study participants. As an example, the study samples analysed by mass spectrometry in the clinical area were cerebrospinal fluid, plasma, saliva, serum, biological tissues, urine, metabolomics, in-vitro biological, solutions and other [please contact Biopharm Reports if you require the full (14) industry-specific listings].

Applications: The use of mass spectrometry for different applications across 14 fields previously indicated. As the applications differ with field, each was considered individually and presented to appropriate study participants. As an example, the specified applications for the use of mass spectrometry in the clinical area were air samples, amino acids, biological fluids, biological reaction kinetics, biological tissues, biomarkers, carbohydrates, chemical reaction kinetics, chemical reaction solutions, drug metabolites, drugs, imaging, in-vitro biological solutions, lipids, liquid drug formulations, metals, natural products, nucleotides, pathology samples, polynucleotides, proteins, peptides, residual chemicals, solid drug formulations, toxicology samples, toxins and other.

Quantitative vs. Qualitative: The percentage of current mass spectrometry applications that are either quantitative, qualitative or both.

Sample Preparation: Current use of 13 specified sample preparation methods in mass spectrometry, namely automated sample preparation, solid-phase extraction (SPE), liquid-liquid extraction (LLE), gas chromatography-MS (GC-MS), liquid chromatography-MS (LC-MS), capillary electrophoresis-MS (CE-MS), ion mobility spectrometry-MS (IMS-MS), size exclusion, organic solvent precipitation, direct injection, dialysis, affinity methods, filtration or other.

Most Challenging applications: The molecule (or molecule class) analysed using their most challenging or difficult mass spectrometry application, specifying sample or matrix.

Mass Spectrometry Systems: The ionisation, analyser, configuration and fragmentation methods in the most challenging mass spectrometry application previously referred to. Specified ionisation methods were atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation (APCI), atmospheric pressure photoionisation (APPI), chemical ionisation (CI), desorption chemical ionisation (DCI), desorption/ionisation on silicon (DIOS), direct analysis in real time (DART), electron ionisation (EI), electrospray ionisation (ESI), fast atom bombardment (FAB), field desorption (FD), field ionisation (FI), glow discharge (GD), inductively coupled plasma (ICP), ion attachment ionisation (IAI), matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation (MALDI), negative ion electron capture (NIEC), thermal ionisation (TI), thermospray or other; specified analysers were orbitrap, quadrupole mass filter (QMF), sector, linear quadrupole ion trap, 3D quadrupole ion trap, time of flight (TOF), TOFIMS, differential mobility analyzer (DMA), differential mobility spectrometer (DMS), fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS), ion-mobility mass spectrometry (IMS) and other; specified configurations were accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), capillary electrophoresis mass spectrometry (EC-MS), gas chromatography MS (GC-MS), gas chromatography tandem MS (GC-MS/MS),GC-IMS, glow discharge mass spectrometry (GD-MS),inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS),ion mobility spectrometry mass spectrometry (IMS/MS),isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS),liquid chromatography ion mobility spectrometry mass spectrometry (LC-IMS),liquid chromatography ion mobility spectrometry mass spectrometry/MS (LC-IMS/MS),liquid chromatography MS (LC-MS),liquid chromatography tandem MS (LC-MS/MS),spark source mass spectrometry (SSMS), stand-alone MS (MS), supercritical fluid chromatography MS (SFC-MS), tandem MS (MS/MS), thermal ionization-mass spectrometry (TIMS) and other; specified fragmentation methods were blackbody infrared radiative dissociation (BIRD), collision-induced dissociation (CID), electron capture dissociation (ECD), electron transfer dissociation (ETD), electron-detachment dissociation (EDD), infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD), surface-induced dissociation (SID) and other.

Sample Preparation: The most important sample preparation methods used in your most challenging mass spectrometry method previously referred to, from 13 specified sample preparation methods in mass spectrometry, namely automated sample preparation, solid-phase extraction (SPE), liquid-liquid extraction (LLE), gas chromatography-MS (GC-MS), liquid chromatography-MS (LC-MS), capillary electrophoresis-MS (CE-MS), ion mobility spectrometry-MS (IMS-MS), size exclusion, organic solvent precipitation, direct injection, dialysis, affinity methods, filtration or other.

Challenges: The main reasons for the challenges associated with the most challenging mass spectrometry methods.

Future mass spectrometer companies: The anticipated use of mass spectrometers from 32 specified mass spectrometer companies over the next three years, where the specified options were cease altogether, large decrease, small decrease, remain same, small increase, large increase.

Future ionisation methods: The anticipated use over the next three years of 18 specified ionisation methods in mass spectrometry, namely atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation (APCI), atmospheric pressure photoionisation (APPI), chemical ionisation (CI), desorption chemical ionisation (DCI), desorption/ionisation on silicon (DIOS), direct analysis in real time (DART), electron ionisation (EI), electrospray ionisation (ESI), fast atom bombardment (FAB), field desorption (FD), field ionisation (FI), glow discharge (GD), inductively coupled plasma (ICP), ion attachment ionisation (IAI), matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation (MALDI), negative ion electron capture (NIEC), thermal ionisation (TI), thermospray or other, where the specified options were cease altogether, large decrease, small decrease, remain same, small increase, large increase.

Future ion analysers: The anticipated use over the next three years of 12 specified ion analysers in mass spectrometry, namely orbitrap, quadrupole mass filter (QMF), sector, linear quadrupole ion trap, 3D quadrupole ion trap, time of flight (TOF), TOFIMS, differential mobility analyzer (DMA), differential mobility spectrometer (DMS), fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS), ion-mobility mass spectrometry (IMS) and other, where the specified options were cease altogether, large decrease, small decrease, remain same, small increase, large increase.

Future databases: Anticipated use over the next three years of (participant specified) database software in mass spectrometry, where the options were cease altogether, large decrease, small decrease, remain same, small increase, large increase.

Future specialist software: Anticipated use over the next three years of other (participant specified) specialist software in mass spectrometry, where the options were cease altogether, large decrease, small decrease, remain same, small increase, large increase.

Future configurations: Anticipated use over the next three years of 18 specified configurations (e.g. LC MS/MS) in mass spectrometry, namely accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), capillary electrophoresis mass spectrometry (EC-MS), gas chromatography MS (GC-MS),gas chromatography tandem MS (GC-MS/MS),GC-IMS, glow discharge mass spectrometry (GD-MS),inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS),ion mobility spectrometry mass spectrometry (IMS/MS),isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS),liquid chromatography ion mobility spectrometry mass spectrometry (LC-IMS),liquid chromatography ion mobility spectrometry mass spectrometry/MS (LC-IMS/MS),liquid chromatography MS (LC-MS),liquid chromatography tandem MS (LC-MS/MS),spark source mass spectrometry (SSMS), stand-alone MS (MS), supercritical fluid chromatography MS (SFC-MS), tandem MS (MS/MS), thermal ionization-mass spectrometry (TIMS) and other, where the options were cease altogether, large decrease, small decrease, remain same, small increase, large increase.

Future fragmentation methods: Anticipated use over the next three years of 7 specified fragmentation methods (e.g. ECD) in mass spectrometry, namely blackbody infrared radiative dissociation (BIRD), collision-induced dissociation (CID), electron capture dissociation (ECD), electron transfer dissociation (ETD), electron-detachment dissociation (EDD), infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD), surface-induced dissociation (SID) and other, where the options were cease altogether, large decrease, small decrease, remain same, small increase, large increase.

Future sample preparation: Anticipated future use over the next three years of 13 specified sample preparation methods in mass spectrometry, namely automated sample preparation, solid-phase extraction (SPE), liquid-liquid extraction (LLE), gas chromatography-MS (GC-MS), liquid chromatography-MS (LC-MS), capillary electrophoresis-MS (CE-MS), ion mobility spectrometry-MS (IMS-MS), size exclusion, organic solvent precipitation, direct injection, dialysis, affinity methods, filtration or other, where the options were cease altogether, large decrease, small decrease, remain same, small increase, large increase.

Important Innovation: The mass spectrometry areas anticipated to see the greatest innovation over the next three years, where the options are sample preparation, ionisation methods, ion analyzers, detection methods, data systems/specialist software, other. If other, please indicate.

Required Innovation: The mass spectrometry areas where innovation is most required, where the options are sample preparation, ionisation methods, ion analyzers, detection methods, data systems/specialist software, other. If other, please indicate.

Recent Innovation: The most important innovations in mass spectrometry over the last three years.

Future Innovation: From what is currently in development, the most important innovations anticipated over the next three years.

Emerging Applications: The most important emerging applications in mass spectrometry.

Mass Spectrometry Activities: Percentage of time spent on daily mass spectrometry activities, where the options are sample preparation, analysis and data handling.

Run time: The average run time (sample preparation + analysis + data handling) per sample using mass spectrometry.

Daily sample throughput: The average daily sample throughput using mass spectrometry.

Weekly sample throughput: The average weekly sample throughput using mass spectrometry.

Annual sample throughput: The average annual sample throughput using mass spectrometry.

System running costs: The average financial running costs of mass spectrometry systems (i.e. per system) namely, per hour, per day and per year.

Financial budget: The average annual financial budget for mass spectrometry activities.

Financial budget breakdown: The percentage breakdown of annual budgets for mass spectrometry relating to MS-related instruments, sample preparation instruments, consumables, data handling/specialist software and other.

Future Financial budget: Anticipated change in future financial budgets for mass spectrometry, where the options were cease altogether, large decrease, small decrease, remain same, small increase, large increase.

Consumables: The top three mass spectrometry consumables in terms of costs.
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1. INTRODUCTION

2. PARTICIPANTS

3. MASS SPECTROMETRY SYSTEMS

4. IONISATION METHODS

5. ION ANALYZERS

6. DATA SYSTEMS

7. MS CONFIGURATIONS

8. FRAGMENTATION

9. MOLECULES

10. PURPOSE

11. SAMPLES

12. APPLICATIONS

13. QUANTITATIVE VS. QUALITATIVE

14. SAMPLE PREPARATION

15. CHALLENGING APPLICATIONS

16. FUTURE USE

17. INNOVATION

18. MASS SPECTROMETRY ACTIVITIES

19. EXPENDITURE

20. FINAL COMMENTS

21. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS

22. APPENDICES

FIGURES

Figure 2.1 Countries of individuals participating in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 2.2 Global regions of individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 2.3 Organisation types of individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 2.4 Fields (i.e. sectors) of individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 3.1 Top ten currently used mass spectrometry companies and suppliers indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 4.1 Top ten currently used ionisation methods, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 5.1 Top ten currently used ion analyzers, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 6.1 Independent data systems currently used in mass spectrometry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 6.2 The top ten independent data systems currently used in mass spectrometry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 6.3 The top ten database software systems currently used in mass spectrometry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 6.4 The top ten other software systems currently used in mass spectrometry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 7.1 Top ten configurations currently used in mass spectrometry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 7.2 Top ten other configurations currently used in mass spectrometry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 8.1 Top ten fragmentation methods currently used in mass spectrometry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 8.2 Top ten other fragmentation methods currently used in mass spectrometry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 9.1 Top ten molecules currently analyzed using mass spectrometry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 10.1 Top ten purposes (or reasons) for using mass spectrometry in the biotechnology industry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 10.2 Top ten purposes (or reasons) for using mass spectrometry in the chemical industry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 10.3 Top ten purposes (or reasons) for using mass spectrometry in the clinical industry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 10.4 Top ten purposes (or reasons) for using mass spectrometry in the defence industry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 10.5 Top ten purposes (or reasons) for using mass spectrometry in the energy industry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 10.6 Top ten purposes (or reasons) for using mass spectrometry in the environmental industry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 10.7 Top ten purposes (or reasons) for using mass spectrometry in the food and drink industry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 10.8 Top ten purposes (or reasons) for using mass spectrometry in the forensics industry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 10.9 Top ten purposes (or reasons) for using mass spectrometry in the geology industry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 10.10 Top ten purposes (or reasons) for using mass spectrometry in the healthcare industry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 10.11 Top ten purposes (or reasons) for using mass spectrometry in the natural products industry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 10.12 Top ten purposes (or reasons) for using mass spectrometry in the pharmaceutical industry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 10.13 Top ten purposes (or reasons) for using mass spectrometry in universities and research institutes, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 11.1 Top ten sample types analysed using mass spectrometry in the biotechnology industry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 11.2 Top ten sample types analysed using mass spectrometry in the chemical industry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 11.3 Top ten sample types analysed using mass spectrometry in the clinical industry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 11.4 Top ten sample types analysed using mass spectrometry in the defence industry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 11.5 Top ten sample types analysed using mass spectrometry in the energy industry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 11.6 Top ten sample types analysed using mass spectrometry in the environmental industry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 11.7 Top ten sample types analysed using mass spectrometry in the food and drink industry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 11.8 Top ten sample types analysed using mass spectrometry in the forensics industry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 11.9 Top ten sample types analysed using mass spectrometry in the geology industry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 11.10 Top ten sample types analysed using mass spectrometry in the healthcare industry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 11.11 Top ten sample types analysed using mass spectrometry in the natural products industry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 11.12 Top ten sample types analysed using mass spectrometry in the pharmaceutical industry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 11.13 Top ten sample types analysed using mass spectrometry in universities and research institutes, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 12.1 Top ten mass spectrometry applications used in the biotechnology industry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 12.2 Top ten mass spectrometry applications used in the chemical industry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 12.3 Top ten mass spectrometry applications used in the clinical industry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 12.4 Top ten mass spectrometry applications used in the defence industry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 12.5 Top ten mass spectrometry applications used in the energy industry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 12.6 Top ten mass spectrometry applications used in the environmental industry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 12.7 Top ten mass spectrometry applications used in the food and drink industry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 12.8 Top ten mass spectrometry applications used in the forensics industry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 12.9 Top ten mass spectrometry applications used in the geology industry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 12.10 Top ten mass spectrometry applications used in the healthcare industry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 12.11 Top ten mass spectrometry applications used in the natural products industry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 12.12 Top ten mass spectrometry applications used in the pharmaceutical industry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 12.13 Top ten mass spectrometry applications used in universities and research institutes, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 13.1 The proportions (%) of individuals who use qualitative or quantitative applications in mass spectrometry, or both, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 14.1 Top ten sample preparation techniques currently used in mass spectrometry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 14.2 Top ten most challenging or difficult applications in mass spectrometry by molecule type, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 14.3 Top ten most challenging or difficult applications in mass spectrometry by sample matrix, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 14.4 Top ten ionisation methods used in the most challenging or difficult applications in mass spectrometry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 14.5 Top ten ion analyzers used in the most challenging or difficult applications in mass spectrometry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 14.6 Top ten configurations used in the most challenging or difficult applications in mass spectrometry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 14.7 Top ten fragmentations methods used in the most challenging or difficult applications in mass spectrometry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 14.8 Top ten sample preparation methods used in the most challenging or difficult applications in mass spectrometry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 16.1 The top ten mass spectrometry companies from which products will be purchased over the next three years (2012 – 2015), indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 16.2 The top ten ionisation methods that will be used over the next three years (2012 – 2015), indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 16.3 The top ten ion analyzers that will be used over the next three years (2012 – 2-15), indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 16.4 The top ten database/software systems that will be used over the next three years (2012 – 2015), indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 16.5 The top ten other specialist software systems that will be used over the next three years (2012 – 2-15), indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 16.6 The top ten mass spectrometry configurations that will be used over the next three years (2012 – 2015), indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 16.7 The top ten mass spectrometry fragmentation methods that will be used over the next three years (2012 – 2015), indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 16.8 The top sample preparation methods that will be used over the next three years (2012 – 2015), indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 17.1 The areas of greatest innovation in mass spectrometry anticipated over the next three years, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 17.2 The areas of innovation that are most required in mass spectrometry over the next three years, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 17.3 Top ten most important innovations in mass spectrometry over the last three years, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 17.4 Top ten most important innovations in mass spectrometry that are anticipated over the next three years, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 17.5 Top ten emerging applications in mass spectrometry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 18.1 The major time-consuming areas in mass spectrometry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 18.2 A profile of the average run time (sample preparation + analysis + data handling) of samples in mass spectrometry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 18.3 A profile of the average daily sample throughput in mass spectrometry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 18.4 A profile of the average weekly sample throughput in mass spectrometry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 18.5 A profile of the average annual sample throughput in mass spectrometry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 19.1 A profile of the average mass spectrometry running costs per system per hour, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 19.2 A profile of the average mass spectrometry running costs per system per day, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 19.3 A profile of the average mass spectrometry running costs per system per year, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 19.4 A profile of the average annual financial budget for mass spectrometry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 19.5 A breakdown of the major areas of expenditure in mass spectrometry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 19.6 Predicted changes in financial budgets for mass spectrometry over the next three years (2012 – 2015), indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Figure 19.7 The top ten consumables used in mass spectrometry based on their cost, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.

TABLES

Table 2.1 Countries of individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Table 2.2 Global regions of individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Table 2.3 Organisation types of individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Table 3.1 Currently used mass spectrometry companies, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Table 3.2 Other currently used mass spectrometry companies, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Table 4.1 Currently used ionisation methods, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Table 4.2 Other currently used ionisation methods, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Table 5.1 Currently used ion analyzers, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Table 5.2 Other currently used ion analyzers, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Table 6.1 Independent data systems currently used in mass spectrometry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Table 6.2 Database software systems currently used in mass spectrometry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Table 6.3 Other software systems currently used in mass spectrometry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Table 7.1 Configurations currently used in mass spectrometry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Table 7.2 Other configurations currently used in mass spectrometry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Table 8.1 Fragmentation methods currently used in mass spectrometry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Table 8.2 Other fragmentation methods currently used in mass spectrometry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Table 9.1 Molecules currently analyzed using mass spectrometry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Table 9.2 Other molecules currently analyzed using mass spectrometry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Table 14.1 Sample preparation techniques currently used in mass spectrometry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Table 14.1 Most challenging or difficult applications in mass spectrometry by molecule type, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Table 14.2 Most challenging or difficult applications in mass spectrometry by sample matrix, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Table 14.3 Sample preparation methods used in the most challenging or difficult applications in mass spectrometry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Table 14.4 Other sample preparation methods used in the most challenging or difficult applications in mass spectrometry, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Table 14.5 The most challenging methods in mass spectrometry, by molecule, matrix and challenge, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Table 16.1 Mass spectrometry companies from which products will be purchased over the next three years (2012 – 2015), indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Table 16.2 Other spectrometry companies from which products and/or services will be purchased over the next three years (2012 – 2015), indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Table 16.3 Ionisation methods that will be used over the next three years (2012 – 2015), indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Table 16.4 Other ionisation methods that will be used over the next three years (2012 – 2015), indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Table 16.5 Ion analyzers that will be used over the next three years (2012 – 2015), indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Table 16.6 Other ion analyzers that will be used over the next three years (2012 – 2015), indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Table 16.7 Database/software systems that will be used over the next three years (2012 – 2015), indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Table 16.8 Other database/software systems that will be used over the next three years (2012 – 2-15), indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Table 16.9 Other specialist software systems that will be used over the next three years (2012 – 2015), indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Table 16.10 Mass spectrometry configurations that will be used over the next three years (2012 – 2015), indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Table 16.11 Other mass spectrometry configurations that will be used over the next three years (2012 – 2015), indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Table 16.12 Mass spectrometry fragmentation methods that will be used over the next three years (2012 – 2015), indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Table 16.13 Other mass spectrometry fragmentation methods that will be used over the next three years (2012 – 2015), indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Table 16.14 Sample preparation methods that will be used over the next three years (2012 – 2015), indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Table 16.15 Other sample preparation methods that will be used over the next three years (2012 – 2015), indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Table 17.1 Most important innovations in mass spectrometry over the last three years, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Table 17.2 Most important innovations in mass spectrometry that are anticipated over the next three years, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Table 17.3 Emerging applications in mass spectrometry, as indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.
Table 19.1 The top ten consumables used in mass spectrometry based on their cost, indicated by individuals who participated in Mass Spectrometry 2012.

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Mass Spectrometry 2013: A Focus on Sales Growth
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