The Malaysian Defense Industry - Market Opportunities and Entry Strategies, Analyses and Forecasts to 2017

Date: December 17, 2012
Pages: 115
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Publisher: Strategic Defence Intelligence (SDI)
Report type: Strategic Report
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The Malaysian Defense Industry - Market Opportunities and Entry Strategies, Analyses and Forecasts to 2017
Product Synopsis

This report is the result of SDI's extensive market and company research covering the Malaysian defense industry, and provides detailed analysis of both historic and forecast defense industry values including key growth stimulators, analysis of the leading companies in the industry, and key news.

Introduction and Landscape

Why was the report written?

The Malaysian defense Industry Market Opportunities and Entry Strategies, Analyses and Forecasts to 2017 offers the reader aninsight into the market opportunities and entry strategies adopted by foreign original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) to gain a market share in the Malaysian defense industry.

What is the current market landscape and what is changing?

The Malaysian defense industry is expected to record a CAGR of 7.5% over the forecast period, and the country has a limited presence in the global defense industry. The primary reason for the strong growth anticipated in Malaysian defense expenditure is the country's previously inadequate levels of spending, and the need to therefore invest significant amounts in order to possess effective armed forces. Consequently, the country's defense expenditure is expected to increase throughout the forecast period, with the capital expenditure allocation of the Malaysian defense budget expected to increase from 22% in 2012 to 25% by 2017. Despite this, as a percentage of GDP, Malaysia's defense expenditure is expected to decline from an average of 1.7% to an average of 1.5%, as a result of the increasing deficit reduction efforts of the Malaysian Government. Over the forecast period, the country's homeland security expenditure is expected to be driven by increasing criminal activity and religious tensions.

What are the key drivers behind recent market changes?

Malaysia is expected to invest a total of US$26.23 billion to meet its defense requirements, this expenditure isdriven by the country's politically unstable location, its involvement in an arms race with Singapore, the strained relationship with Indonesia, participation in peacekeeping missions, and accumulated demand for defense equipment due to historically low levels of defense expenditure. Furthermore, the Malaysian economy is expected to record strong growth during the forecast period, enhancing the country's ability to replace obsolete weaponry.

What makes this report unique and essential to read?

The Malaysian Defense Industry Market Opportunities and Entry Strategies, Analyses and Forecasts to 2017 provides detailed analysis of the current industry size and growth expectations from 2013 to 2017, including highlights of key growth stimulators. It also benchmarks the industry against key global markets and provides a detailed understanding of emerging opportunities in specific areas.

Key Features and Benefits

The report provides detailed analysis of the current industry size and growth expectations from 2013 to 2017, including highlights of key growth stimulators, and also benchmarks the industry against key global markets and provides a detailed understanding of emerging opportunities in specific areas.

The report includes trend analysis of imports and exports, together with their implications and impact on the Malaysian defense industry.

The report covers five forces analysis to identify various power centers in the industry and how these are expected to develop in the future.

The report allows readers to identify possible ways to enter the market, together with detailed descriptions of how existing companies have entered the market, including key contracts, alliances, and strategic initiatives.

The report helps the reader to understand the competitive landscape of the defense industry in Malaysia. It provides an overview of key defense companies, both domestic and foreign, together with insights such as key alliances, strategic initiatives, and a brief financial analysis.

Key Market Issues

The Malaysian defense budget, which is estimated at US$4.4 billion for 2013, is lower than the majority of Malaysia's neighbors, with the Philippines being one of the few countries with a lower defense budget; this relatively small defense budget size frequently deters investors from venturing into the country. Moreover, the Malaysian government has also made offsets mandatory for all defense procurements exceeding US$13.2 million. In an attempt to encourage domestic defense development, the Malaysian government awards additional significance to direct offsets; however, due to the lack of sufficient investment and a shortage of skilled Malaysian labor, foreign OEMs are unable to transfer sophisticated technology to domestic defense companies. The combination of the factors outlined above reduces the attractiveness of the Malaysian defense industry for foreign OEMs.

The growth of the Malaysian defense industry is restricted by high levels of corruption and a lack of transparency throughout the military procurement process;for example, a number of contracts awarded by the Malaysian Ministry of Defense raise suspicion, as in the case of DCN, an arms manufacturer based in France, in its dealing with the Malaysian Government. DCN is accused of paying US$151.1 million as commission to a company called Perimekar, during the Scorpene class submarines deal in 2002;it is also alleged that Perimekar, the company that received this money, was established in 2001 for the purposes of receiving coercion money, and was wholly controlled by a close friend of Najib Tun Razak, the then Defense Minister of Malaysia. Although the scandal surfaced in Malaysia in 2006, no action has been taken against any people involved;an inquiry is currently in progress in the French courts.

Malaysian government policy requires all foreign defense procurements be executed by a company registered as a Bumiputera company, Bumiputera being the term used to refer to the Malay ethnic group. Bumiputera companies must be established under the Companies Act 1965, they must have a paid-up capital of at least RM25,000 (US$7,120), the shareholders must be 100% Bumiputera, and the board of directors, managerial, professional, and supporting staff must be 51% Bumiputera. As a result, the procurement of new equipment and spare parts has to be performed through domestic defense dealers;consequently, offset deals within the country are executed by local brokers rather than Malaysian government officials and, to ensure commission, these representatives ensure that the Malaysian government does not purchase domestic arms. With negligible defense exports, the domestic arms industry relies solely on contracts from the Malaysian Ministry of Defense, and the existence of defense brokers such as these damages the growth of domestic military hardware manufacturers.

Key Highlights

During the review period, Malaysian military expenditure recorded a CAGR of -1.53% and stood at a total of US$4.12 billion in 2012. Over the forecast period, the country's defense spending is expected to record a CAGR of 7.5% to reach a projected value of US$5.96 billion in 2017;this anticipated increase in defense expenditure will be driven by the fact that Malaysia is located in an unstable region, the country's involvement with Singapore in competitive arms procurement, its strained relationship with Indonesia, and its involvement in peacekeeping missions. Furthermore, to compensate for historically low levels of defense expenditure, Malaysia is expected to make a significant investment in the modernization of its armed forces over the forecast period.

Despite the global economic slowdown in 2009, Malaysian defense imports registered an annual volume increase of 191.5%. During 2007-2011, Russia was the country's largest arms supplier, followed by Germany, France, and Spain. As Malaysia maintains good relations with the world's arms supplying countries, the Malaysian defense industry is accessible to foreign companies worldwide, which is vital as, thanks to Malaysia's low defense budget and limited scope for investment in research, development, and the acquisition of new technology, the country's military industrial base is severely undeveloped, with negligible defense exports. This situation is expected to continue over the forecast period and result in Malaysia continuing to rely on defense imports;these imports are expected to be concentrated on ships and aerial surveillance systems as a result of an increased focus on combating maritime security threats.

To aid the development of the domestic defense industry, the Malaysian government encourages foreign investors to enter the country's defense industry through partnerships with domestic defense companies;consequently, a number of foreign companies have entered the Malaysian defense industry through the establishment of a wholly-owned Malaysian subsidiary, with a notable example being Rohde and Schwarz, an electronics manufacturer based in Germany, which used this entry route to enter the country in 2004. In 2010, the company formed an alliance with a domestic company; furthermore, the country hosts two defense exhibitions biennially, providing foreign manufacturers the opportunity to market and sell products within the country.
1 INTRODUCTION

1.1. What is this Report About?
1.2. Definitions
1.3. Summary Methodology
1.4. SDI Terrorism Index
1.5. About Strategic Defence Intelligence (www.strategicdefenceintelligence.com)

2 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

3 MARKET ATTRACTIVENESS AND EMERGING OPPORTUNITIES

3.1. Defense Market Size Historical and Forecast
  3.1.1. Malaysian defense expenditure expected to record a CAGR of XX% over the forecast period
  3.1.2. Defense expenditure is driven by an unstable location, competitive arms acquisitions, the strained relationship with Indonesia, peacekeeping missions, and historically low levels of expenditure
3.2. Analysis of Defense Budget Allocation
  3.2.1. Share of capital expenditure expected to marginally decrease over the forecast period
  3.2.2. Defense expenditure correlated to Malaysian economic growth
3.3. Homeland Security Market Size and Forecast
  3.3.1. The country's homeland security expenditure is expected to record a CAGR of XX% over the forecast period
  3.3.2. Homeland security expenditure expected to be driven by religious tensions and increasing criminal activity
3.4. Benchmarking with Key Global Markets
  3.4.1. Malaysian defense expenditure expected to remain low in comparison with world's leading military spenders
  3.4.2. On a global scale, Malaysian defense expenditure is comparatively low
  3.4.3. Malaysia ranked fourteenth among the largest arms importing countries during the review period
  3.4.4. Military expenditure as a percentage of GDP expected to decline as a result of budget deficit reduction efforts
  3.4.5. Malaysia faces moderate terror threat
3.5. Market Opportunities: Key Trends and Drivers
  3.5.1. Demand for air-to-air missiles expected to increase over the forecast period
  3.5.2. Demand for maritime defense equipment expected to increase
  3.5.3. Air defense systems are expected to experience a considerable increase in demand
  3.5.4. Demand for armored vehicles expected to increase
  3.5.5. Demand is expected to increase for technology that caters to border security

4 DEFENSE PROCUREMENT MARKET DYNAMICS

4.1. Import Market Dynamics
  4.1.1. Lack of domestic defense capabilities expected to drive imports
  4.1.2. Defense imports recorded robust growth during the last three years
  4.1.3. Ships and aircrafts constitute the majority of Malaysia's defense imports
4.2. Export Market Dynamics
  4.2.1. Malaysia has limited export capabilities

5 INDUSTRY DYNAMICS

5.1. Five Forces Analysis
  5.1.1. Bargaining power of supplier: low to high
  5.1.2. Bargaining power of buyer: high to low
  5.1.3. Barrier to entry: medium
  5.1.4. Intensity of rivalry: medium to high
  5.1.5. Threat of substitution: high

6 MARKET ENTRY STRATEGY

6.1. Market Regulation
  6.1.1. The Malaysian Government encourages offsets to develop the domestic defense industry
6.2. Market Entry Route
  6.2.1. Partnerships with domestic defense firms or the establishment of a wholly-owned subsidiary constitute preferred entry routes
  6.2.2. Defense exhibitions provide straightforward entry route for foreign OEMs
6.3. Key Challenges
  6.3.1. Limited defense budget discourages investors from market entry
  6.3.2. Corruption and lack of transparency deter defense industry growth
  6.3.3. Project delays restrict investors
  6.3.4. Mandated use of local representatives limits the growth of the domestic defense industry

7 COMPETITIVE LANDSCAPE AND STRATEGIC INSIGHTS

7.1. Competitive Landscape Overview
7.2. Key Foreign Companies
  7.2.1. AgustaWestland Malaysia Sdn Bhd: overview
  7.2.2. AgustaWestland Malaysia Sdn Bhd: products and services
  7.2.3. AgustaWestland Malaysia Sdn Bhd: recent announcements and strategic initiatives
  7.2.4. Augusta Westland Malaysia Sdn Bhd: alliances
  7.2.5. Augusta Westland Malaysia Sdn Bhd: recent contract wins
7.3. Key Public Sector Companies
  7.3.1. SME Ordnance Sdn Bhd: overview
  7.3.2. SME Ordnance Sdn Bhd: products and services
  7.3.3. SME Ordnance Sdn Bhd: recent announcements and strategic initiatives
  7.3.4. SME Ordnance Sdn Bhd: alliances
  7.3.5. SME Ordnance Sdn Bhd: recent contract wins
  7.3.6. SME Aerospace Sdn Bhd: overview
  7.3.7. SME Aerospace Sdn Bhd: products and services
  7.3.8. SME Aerospace Sdn Bhd: recent announcements and strategic initiatives
  7.3.9. SME Aerospace Sdn Bhd: recent contract wins
  7.3.10. AIROD Sdn Bhd: overview
  7.3.11. AIROD Sdn Bhd: products and services
  7.3.12. AIROD Sdn Bhd: recent announcements and strategic initiatives
  7.3.13. AIROD Sdn Bhd: alliances
  7.3.14. AIROD Sdn Bhd: recent contract wins
7.4. Key Private Sector Companies
  7.4.1. Boustead Naval Shipyard: overview
  7.4.2. Boustead Naval Shipyard: recent announcements and strategic initiatives
  7.4.3. Boustead Naval Shipyard: products and services
  7.4.4. Boustead Naval Shipyard: recent contract wins
  7.4.5. Sapura Thales Electronics Sdn Bhd: overview
  7.4.6. Sapura Thales Electronics Sdn Bhd: products and services
  7.4.7. Sapura Thales Electronics Sdn Bhd: alliances
  7.4.8. Sapura Thales Electronics Sdn Bhd: recent contract wins
  7.4.9. DRB Hicom Defence Technologies Sdn Bhd: overview
  7.4.10. DRB Hicom Defence Technologies Sdn Bhd: products and services
  7.4.11. DRB Hicom Defence Technologies Sdn Bhd: recent announcements and strategic initiatives
  7.4.12. DRB Hicom Defence Technologies Sdn Bhd: alliances
  7.4.13. DRB Hicom Defence Technologies Sdn Bhd: recent contract wins
  7.4.14. Composite Technology Research Malaysia Sdn Bhd: overview
  7.4.15. Composite Technology Research Malaysia Sdn Bhd: products and services
  7.4.16. Composite Technology Research Malaysia Sdn Bhd: alliances
  7.4.17. Composite Technology Research Malaysia Sdn Bhd: recent contract wins
  7.4.18. Labuan Shipyard and Engineering Sdn Bhd: overview
  7.4.19. Labuan Shipyard and Engineering Sdn Bhd: products and services
  7.4.20. Labuan Shipyard and Engineering Sdn Bhd: recent announcements and strategic initiatives
  7.4.21. Labuan Shipyard and Engineering Sdn Bhd: alliances
  7.4.22. Labuan Shipyard and Engineering Sdn Bhd: recent contract wins

8 BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT AND COUNTRY RISK

8.1. Demographics and Social Statistics
  8.1.1. Population - Female
  8.1.2. Population - Male
8.2. Economic Performance
  8.2.1. Business Confidence index
  8.2.2. Construction Output, Current Prices, Local Currency
  8.2.3. Construction Output, Current Prices, US Dollars
  8.2.4. Current Account Balance as Percentage of GDP
  8.2.5. Debt-Service Ratio
  8.2.6. Deposit Interest Rate
  8.2.7. Exports of goods and services, current prices
  8.2.8. External debt as percentage of GDP (%)
  8.2.9. Fiscal Balance as a percentage of GDP
  8.2.10. Foreign Direct Investment
  8.2.11. GDP at Purchasing Power Parity
  8.2.12. GDP, Constant Prices (Local Currency)
  8.2.13. GDP, Constant Prices (US$)
  8.2.14. GDP, Current Prices (Local Currency)
  8.2.15. GDP, Current Prices (US$)
  8.2.16. General Government Final Consumption Expenditure
  8.2.17. Gross Fixed Capital Formation, Current Prices
  8.2.18. Imports of goods and services
  8.2.19. Inflation, average consumer prices
  8.2.20. Interest rate (Lending)
  8.2.21. Manufacturing Output, Current Prices (Local Currency Bn)
  8.2.22. Manufacturing Output, Current Prices (US$ Billions)
  8.2.23. US$- Exchange Rate (EoP)
  8.2.24. Wholesale Price Index
8.3. Energy and Utilities
  8.3.1. Crude Oil Distillation Capacity
  8.3.2. Electricity Exports
  8.3.3. Electricity Installed Capacity
  8.3.4. Fossil Fuels Proved natural gas reserves
  8.3.5. Fossil Fuels- Proved oil reserves
  8.3.6. Hydroelectricity Installed Capacity
  8.3.7. Natural Gas Consumption
  8.3.8. Natural Gas Production
  8.3.9. Net Conventional Thermal Electricity Generation
  8.3.10. Net Hydroelectric Power Generation
  8.3.11. Petroleum, Consumption
  8.3.12. Petroleum, Production
8.4. Minerals
  8.4.1. Coal Consumption
  8.4.2. Coal Production
8.5. Social and Political Risk
  8.5.1. Political Stability Index
  8.5.2. Transparency Index
8.6. Technology
  8.6.1. Fixed Broadband Internet Subscribers
  8.6.2. Patents Granted

9 APPENDIX

9.1. About SDI
9.2. Disclaimer

LIST OF TABLES

Table 1: Malaysian Defense Expenditure, 2008-2012
Table 2: Malaysian Defense Expenditure, 2013-2017
Table 3: Malaysian Defense Budget Split Between Capital and Revenue Expenditure (%), 2008-2012
Table 4: Malaysian Defense Budget Split Between Capital and Revenue Expenditure (%), 2013-2017
Table 5: Malaysian GDP Growth vs. Defense Expenditure Growth and Defense Expenditure as Percentage of GDP Growth, 2008-2012
Table 6: Malaysian GDP Growth vs. Defense Expenditure Growth and Defense Expenditure asPercentage of GDP, 2013-2017
Table 7: MalaysianHomeland Security Budget (US$ billion), 2008-2012
Table 8: MalaysianHomeland Security Budget (US$ billion), 2013-2017
Table 9: Benchmarking with Key Markets - 2008-2012 vs. 2013-2017
Table 10: Top Country Ranking by Value of Arms Imports, 2007-2011*
Table 11: SDI Terrorism Index
Table 12: Malaysian Defense Offset Regulations
Table 13: Market Entry by Key Foreign Companies
Table 14: Malaysian Defense Industry Capability
Table 15: AgustaWestland Malaysia Sdn Bhd - Product Focus
Table 16: Augusta Westland Malaysia Sdn Bhd - Alliances
Table 17: Augusta Westland Malaysia Sdn Bhd - Recent Contract Wins
Table 18: SME Ordnance Sdn Bhd - Product Focus
Table 19: SME Ordnance Sdn Bhd - Alliances
Table 20: SME Ordnance Sdn Bhd - Recent Contract Wins
Table 21: SME Aerospace Sdn Bhd - Product Focus
Table 22: SME Aerospace Sdn Bhd - Recent Contract Wins
Table 23: AIROD Sdn Bhd - Product Focus
Table 24: AIROD Sdn Bhd - Alliances
Table 25: AIROD Sdn Bhd - Recent Contract Wins
Table 26: Boustead Naval Shipyard - Product Focus
Table 27: Boustead Naval Shipyard - Recent Contract Wins
Table 28: Sapura Thales Electronics Sdn Bhd - Product Focus
Table 29: Sapura Thales Electronics Sdn Bhd - Alliances
Table 30: Sapura Thales Electronics Sdn Bhd - Recent Contract Wins
Table 31: DRB Hicom Defence Technologies Sdn Bhd - Product Focus
Table 32: DRB Hicom Defence Technologies Sdn Bhd - Alliances
Table 33: DRB Hicom Defence Technologies Sdn Bhd - Recent Contract Wins
Table 34: Composite Technology Research Malaysia Sdn Bhd - Product Focus
Table 35: Composite Technology Research Malaysia Sdn Bhd - Alliances
Table 36: Composite Technology Research Malaysia Sdn Bhd - Recent Contract Wins
Table 37: Labuan Shipyard and Engineering Sdn Bhd - Product Focus
Table 38: Labuan Shipyard and Engineering Sdn Bhd - Alliances
Table 39: Labuan Shipyard and Engineering Sdn Bhd - Recent Contract Wins

LIST OF FIGURES

Figure 1: Malaysian Defense Expenditure, 2008-2012
Figure 2: Malaysian Defense Expenditure, 2013-2017
Figure 3:Malaysian Defense Budget Split Between Capital and Revenue Expenditure (%), 2008-2012
Figure 4: Malaysian Defense Budget Split Between Capital and Revenue Expenditure (%), 2013-2017
Figure 5: Malaysian GDP Growth vs. Defense Expenditure Growth and Defense Expenditure as Percentage of GDP Growth, 2008-2012
Figure 6: Malaysian GDP Growth vs. Defense Expenditure Growth and Defense ExpenditureasPercentage of GDP, 2013-2017
Figure 7: Malaysian Homeland Security Budget (US$ billion), 2008-2012
Figure 8: Malaysian Homeland Security Budget (US$ billion), 2013-2017
Figure 9: SDI Terrorism Heat Map, 2012
Figure 10: SDI Terrorism Index, 2012
Figure 11: Benchmarking with Key Markets - 2008-2012 vs. 2013-2017
Figure 12: Benchmarking with World's Largest Defense Spenders - 2012 and 2017
Figure 13: Benchmarking with Large Defense Spenders as Percentage of GDP - 2012
Figure 14: Malaysia Defense Imports (US$ Million), 2007-2011
Figure 15: Malaysian Defense Imports by Supplier and Weapon Category (%), 2007-2011
Figure 16: Industry Dynamics - Porter's Five Forces Analysis
Figure 17: Malaysia Population - Female (In Millions), 2008-2017
Figure 18: Malaysia Population - Male (In Millions), 2008-2017
Figure 19: Malaysia Business Confidence index, 2003-2012
Figure 20: Malaysia Construction Output, Current Prices, Local Currency (In Billions), 2001-2010
Figure 21: Malaysia Construction Output, Current Prices,US Dollars (In Billions), 2001-2010
Figure 22: Malaysia Current Account Balance as Percentage of GDP, 2008-2017
Figure 23: Malaysia Debt-Service Ratio, 2001-2010
Figure 24: Malaysia Deposit Interest Rate, 2001-2010
Figure 25: Malaysia Exports of goods and services, current prices (US$ Billion), 2001- 2010
Figure 26: Malaysia External debt as percentage of GDP, 2001-2010
Figure 27: Malaysia Fiscal Balance as a percentage of GDP, 2001-2010
Figure 28: Malaysia Foreign Direct Investment(US$ Billion), 2001-2010
Figure 29: Malaysia GDP at Purchasing Power Parity (US$ Billion), 2006-2015
Figure 30: Malaysia GDP at Constant Prices(Local Currency Billion), 2006-2015
Figure 31: Malaysia GDP at Constant Prices(US$ Billion), 2006-2015
Figure 32: Malaysia GDP atCurrent Prices(Local Currency Billion), 2006-2015
Figure 33: Malaysia GDP atCurrent Prices(US$ Billion), 2006-2015
Figure 34: Malaysia General Government Final Consumption Expenditure (US$ Billion), 2001-2010
Figure 35: Malaysia Gross Fixed Capital Formation, Current Prices(US$ Billion), 2001-2010
Figure 36: Malaysia Imports of goods and services (current US$ Billion), 2001-2010
Figure 37: Malaysia Inflation, average consumer prices, 2008-2017
Figure 38: Malaysia Interest rate(Lending), 2001-2010
Figure 39: Malaysia Manufacturing Output, Current Prices (Local Currency Billion), 2001-2010
Figure 40: Malaysia Manufacturing Output, Current Prices (US$ Billion), 2001-2010
Figure 41: Malaysia US$- Exchange Rate (EoP), 2002-2011
Figure 42: Malaysia Wholesale Price Index, 2000-2009
Figure 43: Malaysia Crude Oil Distillation Capacity (Thousand Barrels Per Cal Day),2000-2009
Figure 44: Malaysia Electricity Exports (Billion Kilowatthours), 2001-2010
Figure 45: Malaysia Electricity Installed Capacity (Million Kilowatts), 2000-2009
Figure 46: Malaysia Fossil Fuels Proved Natural Gas Reserves (Trillion Cubic Feet), 2002-2011
Figure 47: Malaysia Fossil Fuels Proved Oil Reserves (Billion Barrels), 2002-2011
Figure 48: Malaysia Hydroelectricity Installed Capacity (Million Kilowatts), 2000-2009
Figure 49: Malaysia Natural Gas Consumption (Million Kilowatts), 2001-2010
Figure 50: Malaysia Natural Gas Production(Billion Cubic Feet), 2001-2010
Figure 51: Malaysia Net Conventional Thermal Electricity Generation (Billion Kilowatt hours), 2001-2010
Figure 52: Malaysia Net Hydroelectric Power Generation(Billion Kilowatthours), 2001-2010
Figure 53: Malaysia Petroleum Consumption (Thousand Barrels Per Day), 2002-2011
Figure 54: Malaysia Petroleum Production (Thousand Barrels Per Day), 2002-2011
Figure 55: Malaysia Coal Consumption (Thousand Short Tons), 2001-2010
Figure 56: Malaysia Coal Production (Thousand Short Tons), 2001-2010
Figure 57: Malaysia Political Stability Index, 2002-2010
Figure 58: Malaysia Transparency Index, 2002-2011
Figure 59: Malaysia Fixed Broadband Internet Subscribers (Thousands), 2001-2010
Figure 60: Patents Granted, 2002-2011

COMPANIES MENTIONED

Agusta Westland Malaysia Sdn Bhd, SME Ordnance Sdn Bhd, SME Aerospace Sdn Bhd, AIROD Sdn Bhd, Boustead Naval Shipyard, Sapura Thales Electronics Sdn Bhd, DRB Hicom Defence Technologies Sdn Bhd ,Composite Technology Research Malaysia Sdn Bhd ,Labuan Shipyard and Engineering Sdn Bhd ,

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