Future of the Malaysian Defense Industry - Market Attractiveness, Competitive Landscape and Forecasts to 2018

Date: July 17, 2013
Pages: 127
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Future of the Malaysian Defense Industry - Market Attractiveness, Competitive Landscape and Forecasts to 2018
Product Synopsis

This report is the result of SDI's extensive market and company research covering the Malaysian defense industry, and provides detailed analysis of both historic and forecast defense industry values including key growth stimulators, analysis of the leading companies in the industry, and key news.

Introduction and Landscape

Why was the report written?

The Future of the Malaysian Defense Industry - Market Attractiveness, Competitive Landscape and Forecasts to 2018 offers the reader an insight into the market opportunities and entry strategies adopted by foreign original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) to gain a market share in the Malaysian defense industry.

What is the current market landscape and what is changing?

Malaysian defense expenditure increased at a CAGR of 6.37% during the review period and valued US$4.96 billion in 2013. The focus of the Malaysian government will be on the modernization of its armed forces, participation in peacekeeping operations, and counter terrorism activities.

What are the key drivers behind recent market changes?

The modernization of the armed forces, participation in UN peacekeeping operations, and territorial disputes are the major drivers of the Malaysian defense industry.

What makes this report unique and essential to read?

The Future of the Malaysian Defense Industry - Market Attractiveness, Competitive Landscape and Forecasts to 2018 provides detailed analysis of the current industry size and growth expectations from 2014 to 2018, including highlights of key growth stimulators. It also benchmarks the industry against key global markets and provides a detailed understanding of emerging opportunities in specific areas.

Key Features and Benefits

The report provides detailed analysis of the current industry size and growth expectations from 2014 to 2018, including highlights of key growth stimulators, and also benchmarks the industry against key global markets and provides a detailed understanding of emerging opportunities in specific areas.

The report includes trend analysis of imports and exports, together with their implications and impact on the Malaysian defense industry.

The report covers five forces analysis to identify various power centers in the industry and how these are expected to develop in the future.

The report allows readers to identify possible ways to enter the market, together with detailed descriptions of how existing companies have entered the market, including key contracts, alliances, and strategic initiatives.

The report helps the reader to understand the competitive landscape of the defense industry in Malaysia. It provides an overview of key defense companies, both domestic and foreign, together with insights such as key alliances, strategic initiatives, and a brief financial analysis.

What makes this report unique and essential to read?

The Malaysian government fulfills most of its defense needs by importing military equipment from the foreign countries such as Russia, Germany, France, and Spain. The overall exports of the country during the period 2008-2012 were negligible, resulting in poor inflow of foreign investment. During the forecast period, the defense exports of the country are expected to remain low as a result of less joint development and collaboration programs, which is expected to remain the key challenge for the Malaysian defense industry during the forecast period.

The Malaysian defense budget, which is estimated at US$4.9 billion for 2013, is lower than the majority of Malaysia's neighbors, with the Philippines being one of the few countries with a lower defense budget, and this relatively small defense budget frequently deters investors from venturing into the country. Moreover, the Malaysian government has made offsets mandatory for all defense procurements exceeding US$13 million, and in an attempt to encourage domestic defense development, the Malaysian government awards additional significance to direct offsets; however, due to the lack of sufficient investment and a shortage of skilled Malaysian labor, foreign OEMs are unable to transfer sophisticated technology to domestic defense companies. The combination of the factors outlined above reduces the attractiveness of the Malaysian defense industry for foreign OEMs.

Key Highlights

The defense offsets in Malaysia were initially introduced in 1990 with the purchase of Hawk aircraft from BAE systems. The Malaysian government's offset policy focuses on the strengthening of the country's aerospace sector and defense industrial base; it is also aimed at attracting the high technology capital and service based technology industries in the country. Previously, offset policy offsets were mandatory for all defense procurements in Malaysia equal to, or exceeding, US$13.0 million; however, the government has revised the offset policy and increased the threshold limit to US$26 million, and is expected to roll this out in coming years. According to the policy, foreign investors are required to invest a minimum of 50% of the contract value into the Malaysian economy; furthermore, half of the total offset value may take the form of countertrade, or agreements to purchase Malaysian goods. Examples of such offset deal are Blenheim's US$5 billion deal with Malaysian government, the Hawk deal with BAE systems, the French Scorpene class submarine deal with DCN, and Russia's Irkut Su-30MK fighters deal.

During 2008-2010, Russia emerged as the predominant arms supplier to Malaysia, with a share of 33%, followed by Germany, with a 25% share, and France, with a 15% share. Over the forecast period, imports from France are expected to increase as a result of the procurement of 257 armored vehicles and the Second Generation Patrol Vessel - Littoral Combat Ship.

With over 60% of the country located on the island of Borneo, Malaysia is highly prone to maritime terrorism, pirates, insurgents, potential attacks from international terrorist organizations, and human trafficking. To counter threats such as these, the country is modernizing its naval and air defense systems, resulting in ships accounting for 48% of Malaysian defense imports during the review period. This large percentage can be attributed to the key procurement program of RMN, started during the review period, which includes the procurement of training ships, Multi-Purpose Support Ships, and Second Generation Patrol Vessel - Littoral Combat Ships. Ships are expected to remain the top imports for Malaysia as a result of continuing procurement programs.
1 INTRODUCTION

1.1. What is this Report About?
1.2. Definitions
1.3. Summary Methodology
1.4. SDI Terrorism Index
1.5. About Strategic Defence Intelligence (www.strategicdefenceintelligence.com)

2 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

3 MARKET ATTRACTIVENESS AND EMERGING OPPORTUNITIES

3.1. Defense Market Size Historical and Forecast
  3.1.1. Malaysian defense budget is expected to grow at an estimated CAGR of 3.27% during the forecast period to reach US$5.68 billion in 2018
  3.1.2. Modernization of the armed forces, participation in UN peacekeeping operations and territorial disputes are the major drivers of Malaysian defense industry
3.2. Analysis of Defense Budget Allocation
  3.2.1. Capital expenditure allocation is expected to increase over the forecast period
  3.2.2. Defense expenditure as a percentage of GDP is expected to decline during the forecast period
3.3. Homeland Security Market Size and Forecast
  3.3.1. The Malaysian homeland security expenditure is expected to grow at a CAGR of 2.38% over the forecast period
  3.3.2. Homeland security expenditure in Malaysia is mainly driven by the racial and religion disputes, rising criminal activities and rising terrorist threats
  3.3.3. Malaysia is at a “moderate risk” of terrorism
  3.3.4. Malaysia has a terrorism index score of “0.5”
3.4. Benchmarking with Key Global Markets
  3.4.1. Malaysian defense expenditure expected to increase over the forecast period
  3.4.2. Malaysian defense expenditure is relatively smaller than other Asian countries
  3.4.3. Malaysia defense budget as a percentage of GDP is expected to decline over the forecast period
  3.4.4. Iraq, Pakistan and Afghanistan are the most terror-prone countries
3.5. Market Opportunities: Key Trends and Growth Stimulators
  3.5.1. Corvettes
  3.5.2. Armored Personnel Carrier (APC)
  3.5.3. Amphibious Ships
  3.5.4. Fighters and Multi-Role Aircrafts
  3.5.5. Cyber security
  3.5.6. Border Security
  3.5.7. Maritime Security

4 DEFENSE PROCUREMENT MARKET DYNAMICS

4.1. Import Market Dynamics
  4.1.1. Malaysian defense imports are expected to increase over the forecast period
  4.1.2. Russia, Germany and France to remain the key arms suppliers to Malaysia
  4.1.3. Ships, aircraft and armored vehicle are expected to be the key imports for Malaysia
4.2. Export Market Dynamics
  4.2.1. No defense exports for Malaysia

5 INDUSTRY DYNAMICS

5.1. Five Forces Analysis
  5.1.1. Bargaining power of supplier: low
  5.1.2. Bargaining power of buyer: high
  5.1.3. Barrier to entry: medium
  5.1.4. Intensity of rivalry: medium to high
  5.1.5. Threat of substitution: high

6 MARKET ENTRY STRATEGY

6.1. Market Regulation
  6.1.1. Malaysian defense industry is largely driven by the government's offset policy
6.2. Market Entry Route
  6.2.1. Entry through technology transfer program
  6.2.2. Entry through partnerships with domestic defense companies
  6.2.3. Defense exhibitions can be used as a direct entry route to the Malaysian defense industry
6.3. Key Challenges
  6.3.1. Negligible defense exports pose challenge for domestic defense companies
  6.3.2. Limited defense budget discourages investors from market entry
  6.3.3. Corruption and lack of transparency impedes the growth of Malaysia's defense industry
  6.3.4. Malaysia's new economic policy (NEP) limits the entry of foreign investors

7 COMPETITIVE LANDSCAPE AND STRATEGIC INSIGHTS

7.1. Competitive Landscape Overview
7.2. Key Public Sector Companies
  7.2.1. Agusta Westland Malaysia Sdn Bhd: Overview
  7.2.2. Agusta Westland Malaysia Sdn Bhd: Products and services
  7.2.3. Agusta Westland Malaysia Sdn Bhd: Recent announcements and strategic initiatives
  7.2.4. Agusta Westland Malaysia Sdn Bhd: alliances
  7.2.5. Agusta Westland Malaysia Sdn Bhd: recent contract wins
7.3. Key Public Sector Companies
  7.3.1. SME Ordnance Sdn Bhd: overview
  7.3.2. SME Ordnance Sdn Bhd: products and services
  7.3.3. SME Ordnance Sdn Bhd: Recent announcements and strategic initiatives
  7.3.4. SME Ordnance Sdn Bhd: Alliances
  7.3.5. SME Ordnance Sdn Bhd: recent contract wins
  7.3.6. SME Aerospace Sdn Bhd: Overview
  7.3.7. SME Aerospace Sdn Bhd: Products and services
  7.3.8. SME Aerospace Sdn Bhd: Recent announcements and strategic initiatives
  7.3.9. SME Aerospace Sdn Bhd: Recent contract wins
  7.3.10. AIROD Sdn Bhd: Overview
  7.3.11. AIROD Sdn Bhd: Products and services
  7.3.12. AIROD Sdn Bhd: Recent announcements and strategic initiatives
  7.3.13. AIROD Sdn Bhd: Alliances
  7.3.14. AIROD Sdn Bhd: Recent contract wins
7.4. Key Private Sector Companies
  7.4.1. Boustead Naval Shipyard: Overview
  7.4.2. Boustead Naval Shipyard: Products and services
  7.4.3. Boustead Naval Shipyard: Recent announcements and strategic initiatives
  7.4.4. Boustead Naval Shipyard: Alliances
  7.4.5. Boustead Naval Shipyard: Recent contract wins
  7.4.6. Zetro Aerospace Corporation Sdn Bhd: Overview
  7.4.7. Zetro Aerospace Corporation Sdn Bhd: Products and services
  7.4.8. Zetro Aerospace Corporation Sdn Bhd: Recent announcements and strategic initiatives
  7.4.9. Zetro Aerospace Corporation Sdn Bhd: Alliances
  7.4.10. Zetro Aerospace Corporation Sdn Bhd: Recent contract wins
  7.4.11. Sapura Thales Electronics Sdn Bhd: Overview
  7.4.12. Sapura Thales Electronics Sdn Bhd: Products and services
  7.4.13. Sapura Thales Electronics Sdn Bhd: Recent announcements and strategic initiatives
  7.4.14. Sapura Thales Electronics Sdn Bhd: Alliances
  7.4.15. Sapura Thales Electronics Sdn Bhd: Recent contract wins
  7.4.16. DRB Hicom Defence Technologies Sdn Bhd: Overview
  7.4.17. DRB Hicom Defence Technologies Sdn Bhd: Products and services
  7.4.18. DRB Hicom Defence Technologies Sdn Bhd: Recent announcements and strategic initiatives
  7.4.19. DRB Hicom Defence Technologies Sdn Bhd: Alliances
  7.4.20. DRB Hicom Defence Technologies Sdn Bhd: Recent contract wins
  7.4.21. MMC Defence Sdn Bhd: Overview
  7.4.22. MMC Defence Sdn Bhd: Products and services
  7.4.23. MMC Defence Sdn Bhd: Recent announcements and strategic initiatives
  7.4.24. MMC Defence Sdn Bhd: Alliances
  7.4.25. MMC Defence Sdn Bhd: Recent contract wins
  7.4.26. Composite Technology Research Malaysia Sdn Bhd: overview
  7.4.27. Composite Technology Research Malaysia Sdn Bhd: products and services
  7.4.28. Composite Technology Research Malaysia Sdn Bhd: recent announcements and strategic initiatives
  7.4.29. Composite Technology Research Malaysia Sdn Bhd: alliances
  7.4.30. Composite Technology Research Malaysia Sdn Bhd: recent contract wins
  7.4.31. Labuan Shipyard and Engineering Sdn Bhd: overview
  7.4.32. Labuan Shipyard and Engineering Sdn Bhd: products and services
  7.4.33. Labuan Shipyard and Engineering Sdn Bhd: recent announcements and strategic initiatives
  7.4.34. Labuan Shipyard and Engineering Sdn Bhd: alliances
  7.4.35. Labuan Shipyard and Engineering Sdn Bhd: recent contract wins
  7.4.36. D' Aquarian Sdn Bhd: Overview
  7.4.37. D'Aquarian Sdn Bhd: Products and services
  7.4.38. D'Aquarian Sdn Bhd: Recent announcements and strategic initiatives
  7.4.39. D'Aquarian Sdn Bhd: Alliances
  7.4.40. D'Aquarian Sdn Bhd: Recent contract wins

8 BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT AND COUNTRY RISK

8.1. Demographics
  8.1.1. Total Rural population
  8.1.2. Total urban population
  8.1.3. Number of households
8.2. Economic Performance
  8.2.1. GDP per capita at constant prices
  8.2.2. GDP at current prices (US$)
  8.2.3. Exports of goods and services (current US$ bn)
  8.2.4. Imports of goods and services (current US$ bn)
  8.2.5. Gross national disposable income (US$ billion)
  8.2.6. Consumer price index
  8.2.7. Wholesale price index
  8.2.8. LCU per US$ (period average)
  8.2.9. Deposit rate (%)
  8.2.10. Market capitalization of listed companies (US$ bn)
  8.2.11. Market capitalization of listed companies (% of GDP)
  8.2.12. Total Government cash surplus/deficit (LCU billion)
  8.2.13. Government cash surplus/deficit as a percentage of GDP (LCU)
  8.2.14. Central government debt (LCU billion)
  8.2.15. Central government debt as a percentage of GDP (LCU)
  8.2.16. Goods exports as a percentage of GDP
  8.2.17. Goods imports as a percentage of GDP
  8.2.18. Goods balance as a percentage of GDP
  8.2.19. Services imports as a percentage of GDP
  8.2.20. Service exports as a percentage of GDP
  8.2.21. Services balance as a percentage of GDP
  8.2.22. Foreign direct investment, net (BoP, current US$ billions)
  8.2.23. Net foreign direct investment as a percentage of GDP
  8.2.24. International reserves, including gold (US$ billion)
8.3. Energy and utilities
  8.3.1. Total Conventional Thermal Electricity Net Generation (Billion kWh)
  8.3.2. Hydroelectricity Net Generation (Billion kWh)
  8.3.3. Nuclear Electricity Net Generation (Billion kWh)
  8.3.4. Total Conventional Thermal Electricity Installed Capacity (Million kW)
  8.3.5. Proved Reserves of Natural Gas (Trillion Cubic Feet)
  8.3.6. Total Petroleum Consumption (Thousand Barrels Per Day)
  8.3.7. Crude Oil Proved Reserves (Billion Barrels)
8.4. Infrastructure Quality and Availability
  8.4.1. Rail lines (total route-km)
  8.4.2. Air transport, freight (million ton-km)
  8.4.3. Overall construction (US$ million)
8.5. Technology
  8.5.1. Patents Granted
8.6. Telecommunication
  8.6.1. Telephone lines (in mn)
  8.6.2. Telephone lines Penetration Rate (per 100 people)

9 APPENDIX

9.1. About SDI
9.2. Disclaimer

LIST OF TABLES

Table 1: Malaysian Defense Expenditure (US$ Billion), 2009-2013
Table 2: Malaysian Defense Expenditure (US$ Billion), 2014-2018
Table 3: Malaysian Defense Budget Split Between Capital and Revenue Expenditure (%), 2009-2013
Table 4: Malaysian Defense Budget Split Between Capital and Revenue Expenditure (%), 2014-2018
Table 5: Malaysian GDP Growth vs. Defense Expenditure Growth vs. Defense Expenditure as Percentage of GDP, 2009-2013
Table 6: Malaysian GDP Growth vs. Defense Expenditure Growth and Defense Expenditure as Percentage of GDP, 2014-2018
Table 7: Malaysian Homeland Security Expenditure (US$ billion), 2009-2013
Table 8: Malaysian Homeland Security Expenditure (US$ billion), 2014-2018
Table 9: Benchmarking with Key Markets - 2008-2012 vs. 2013-2017
Table 10: SDI Terrorism Index
Table 11: Malaysian Defense Offset Regulations
Table 12: Market Entry by Key Foreign Companies
Table 13: Malaysian Defense Industry Capability
Table 14: Agusta Westland Malaysia Sdn Bhd - Product Focus
Table 15: Agusta Westland Malaysia Sdn Bhd - Alliances
Table 16: Agusta Westland Malaysia Sdn Bhd - Recent Contract Wins
Table 17: SME Ordnance Sdn Bhd - Product Focus
Table 18: SME Ordnance Sdn Bhd - Alliances
Table 19: SME Ordnance Sdn Bhd - Recent Contract Wins
Table 20: SME Aerospace Sdn Bhd - Product Focus
Table 21: SME Aerospace Sdn Bhd - Recent Contract Wins
Table 22: AIROD Sdn Bhd - Product Focus
Table 23: AIROD Sdn Bhd - Alliances
Table 24: AIROD Sdn Bhd - Recent Contract Wins
Table 25: Boustead Naval Shipyard - Product Focus
Table 26: Boustead Naval Shipyard - Recent Contract Wins
Table 27: Zetro Aerospace Corporation Sdn Bhd - Product Focus
Table 28: Zetro Aerospace Corporation Sdn Bhd - Alliances
Table 29: Sapura Thales Electronics Sdn Bhd - Product Focus
Table 30: Sapura Thales Electronics Sdn Bhd - Alliances
Table 31: Sapura Thales Electronics Sdn Bhd - Recent Contract Wins
Table 32: DRB Hicom Defence Technologies Sdn Bhd - Product Focus
Table 33: DRB Hicom Defence Technologies Sdn Bhd - Alliances
Table 34: DRB Hicom Defence Technologies Sdn Bhd - Recent Contract Wins
Table 35: MMC Defence Sdn Bhd - Product Focus
Table 36: MMC Defence Sdn Bhd - Alliances
Table 37: Composite Technology Research Malaysia Sdn Bhd - Product Focus
Table 38: Composite Technology Research Malaysia Sdn Bhd - Alliances
Table 39: Composite Technology Research Malaysia Sdn Bhd - Recent Contract Wins
Table 40: Labuan Shipyard and Engineering Sdn Bhd - Product Focus
Table 41: Labuan Shipyard and Engineering Sdn Bhd - Alliances
Table 42: Labuan Shipyard and Engineering Sdn Bhd - Recent Contract Wins
Table 43: D'Aquarian Sdn Bhd - Product Focus
Table 44: D'Aquarian Sdn Bhd - Recent Contract Wins

LIST OF FIGURES

Figure 1: Malaysian Defense Expenditure (US$ Billion), 2009-2013
Figure 2: Malaysian Defense Expenditure (US$ Billion), 2014-2018
Figure 3:Malaysian Defense Budget Split Between Capital and Revenue Expenditure (%), 2009-2013
Figure 4: Malaysian Defense Budget Split Between Capital and Revenue Expenditure (%), 2014-2018
Figure 5: Malaysian GDP Growth vs. Defense Expenditure Growth vs. Defense Expenditure as Percentage of GDP, 2009-2013
Figure 6: Malaysian GDP Growth vs. Defense Expenditure Growth and Defense Expenditure as Percentage of GDP, 2014-2018
Figure 7: Malaysian Homeland Security Expenditure (US$ billion), 2009-2013
Figure 8: Malaysian Homeland Security Expenditure (US$ billion), 2014-2018
Figure 9: SDI Terrorism Heat Map, 2011
Figure 10: SDI Terrorism Index, 2011
Figure 11: Benchmarking with Key Markets - 2008-2012 vs. 2013-2017
Figure 12: Defense Expenditure of the World's Largest Military Spenders (US$ Billion), 2012 and 2017
Figure 13: Defense Expenditure as a Percentage of GDP of Largest Military Spenders (%), 2012
Figure 14: Corvettes (US$ Million), 2013-2023
Figure 15: Armored Personal Carrier (US$ Million), 2013-2023
Figure 16: Amphibious Ships (US$ Million), 2013-2023
Figure 17: Fighter and Multi-role Aircraft (US$ Million), 2013-2023
Figure 18: Cyber Security (US$ Million), 2013-2023
Figure 19: Border Security (US$ Million), 2013-2023
Figure 20: Maritime Security (US$ Million), 2013-2023
Figure 21: Malaysian Defense Import Trend, 2008-2012 (TIV values)
Figure 22: Malaysian Defense Import by Country, 2008-2012 (TIV values)
Figure 23: Malaysia Defense Imports by Category (%), 2008-2012
Figure 24: Industry Dynamics - Porter's Five Forces Analysis
Figure 25: Malaysia Rural population (In million), 2008-2017
Figure 26: Malaysia Urban population (In million), 2008-2017
Figure 27: Malaysia - Number of Households (Million), 2008-2017
Figure 28: Malaysian GDP Per Capita at Constant Prices (US$), 2008-2017
Figure 29: Malaysia - GDP at Current Prices (US$ Billion), 2009-2018
Figure 30: Malaysian Exports of goods and services (US$), 2001-2010
Figure 31: Malaysian Imports of goods and services (US$), 2001-2010
Figure 32: Malaysian Gross national disposable income (US$ billion), 2002-2011
Figure 33: Malaysian Consumer price index, 2008-2017
Figure 34: Malaysian Wholesale price index, 2002-2011
Figure 35: Malaysia LCU per US$, 2008-2017
Figure 36: Malaysian Deposit rate (%), 2001-2010
Figure 37: Malaysian market capitalization of listed companies (US$ billion), 2002-2011
Figure 38: Malaysian market capitalization of listed companies (% of GDP), 2002-2011
Figure 39: Malaysian Total Government cash surplus/deficit (LCU billion), 2005-2010
Figure 40: Malaysian Government cash surplus/deficit as % of GDP (LCU), 2001-2010
Figure 41: Malaysian - Central government debt (LCU billion), 2005-2010
Figure 42: Malaysian Central government debt as % of GDP (LCU), 2002-2010
Figure 43: Malaysia - Goods exports as a % of GDP (%), 2002-2011
Figure 44: Malaysia - Goods imports as a % of GDP (%), 2002-2011
Figure 45: Malaysian Goods balance as a % of GDP (%), 2002-2011
Figure 46: Malaysian Services imports as a % of GDP (%), 2002-2011
Figure 47: Malaysia Service exports as a % of GDP (%), 2002-2011
Figure 48: Malaysia - Services balance as a % of GDP (%), 2001-2010
Figure 49: Malaysia - Foreign direct investment, net (BoP, current US$ billion), 2001-2010
Figure 50: Malaysian Net foreign direct investment as % of GDP, 2001-2009
Figure 51: Malaysian International reserves, including gold (US$ billion), 2002-2011
Figure 52: Malaysia - Total Conventional Thermal Electricity Net Generation (Billion Kilowatt hours), 2001-2010
Figure 53: Malaysian Hydroelectricity Net Generation (Billion Kilowatt hours), 2001-2010
Figure 54: Malaysian Nuclear Electricity Net Generation (Billion Kilowatt hours), 2001-2010
Figure 55: Malaysian Total Conventional Thermal Electricity Installed Capacity (Million Kilowatts), 2001-2010
Figure 56: Malaysian Proved Reserves of Natural Gas (Trillion Cubic Feet), 2002-2011
Figure 57: Malaysian Total Petroleum Consumption (Thousand Barrels Per Day), 2002-2011
Figure 58: Crude Oil Proved Reserves (Billion Barrels), 2002-2011
Figure 59: Malaysian Rail lines (total route-km), 2001-2010
Figure 60: Malaysian Air transport, freight (million ton-km), 2001-2010
Figure 61: Malaysia - Overall construction (US$ million), 2008-2016
Figure 62: Malaysian Patents Granted, 2002-2011
Figure 63: Malaysian Telephone lines, 2001-2010
Figure 64: Malaysian Telephone lines Penetration Rate (per 100 people), 2002-2011

COMPANIES MENTIONED

Agusta Westland Malaysia Sdn Bhd, SME Ordnance Sdn Bhd (SMEO), Aircraft Inspection, Repair and Overhaul Depot (AIROD) Sdn Bhd, Boustead Naval Shipyard (BN Shipyard), Zetro Aerospace Corporation Sdn Bhd, Sapura Thales Electronics Sdn Bhd (STE), DRB Hicom Defence Technologies Sdn Bhd (DEFTECH) ,MMC Defence Sdn Bhd ,Composite Technology Research Malaysia Sdn Bhd ,

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